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Photo: Trent Johnson

A Day in the Life with Smithsonian Folklife Festival Director Sabrina Lynn Motley

Before pursuing roles as vice president of Vesper Society and senior director at Asia Society Texas Center, Sabrina Lynn Motley was a little girl often wandering the halls of various Los Angeles museums. 

“Museums made sense to me because they were a place of learning,” she says. “But [they’re] also a place where you can hide out while your imagination soars.”

A professional life behind the scenes, tucked in offices within vast buildings housing art and artifacts, always made sense to Motley. After successful positions in programming and exhibition planning, the Smithsonian tapped her in 2013 as the new director of its famed Folklife Festival.

Delivering a cultural smorgasbord on the National Mall since 1967, the event focuses on global cultural heritage and connects people to hidden gems of society. This year’s theme is The Social Power of Music, and though the programming has been shortened from 10 days to only two because of the government shutdown, it’s sure to once again evoke emotions and conversations.

To learn more about the festival and Motley, we met in her tucked-away museum office and discussed her early enthusiasm for culture, the shortened festival and the responsibility she feels to engage minds.

On Tap: Did you always want to be in the museum industry growing up?
Sabrina Lynn Motley:
Yeah, I was one of those kids. I loved me some museums. I was one of those kids who didn’t like the circus [or] going to parades. My mother would say that I was one of those weird kids who you’d stick in a gallery and I’d be as happy as can be. My mother knew I was weird.

OT: Everybody’s weird to some extent.
SLM:
Yeah, but let’s be real. I’m an African-American woman of a certain age and I’m sure my mother was like, “I have this little black kid who’s into museums and into this world.” And to her credit, she let me go and explore it. I thank my mother daily for allowing me to be odd and curious. Not every kid gets that, no matter what color they are.

OT: How did you get into festival planning from a sociological perspective?
SLM:
That is a question I get asked all the time that I have no way to answer. I’m a cultural anthropologist by training and disposition, and I’ve done work in museums for most of my professional life. Before this, I largely focused on an intimate scale, so having this opportunity to do what I’ve done for many years with people who are so committed to this kind of work at a larger scale on the National Mall, which has such historic significance to this country, was a challenge that I wanted to take. Even on my worst days, there’s still something in the back of my head that says this work in this way at this place is really a gift, and I’m really fortunate to be able to do it.

OT: Was there a particular reason you gravitated toward programming? Was it a function of necessity or did you choose to go that route?
SLM: No, I chose to do it because I really like the way that culture brings people together and not always in a loving, peaceful way – because sometimes it’s hard. Culture has the power to connect and disrupt and make change – I wanted to be in a place where I could facilitate that [by] coming to the Smithsonian where there’s research and community engagement components, and a real sense that cultural heritage is valuable.

OT: Switching gears to this year’s Folklife Festival, it’s shrinking to only two days. What kind of adjustment period did you go through upon returning from the government shutdown?
SLM: It was not an easy call to make. Certainly, we know there are people that have been coming to this festival since it started in 1967, and their kids and grandkids come. No one wants to disappoint our visitors. I think in this case, we decided to put those relationships with our partners, our artists and the public ahead of just pushing something out onto the Mall.


Can’t Live Without
A hearty laugh with my mom
Meals with friends and family
Irish breakfast tea
Good movies and better books
Music, music and more music


OT: Was that always the plan to have the Social Power of Music and Year of Music coincide?
SLM: Yeah. Huib Schippers, who runs the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and to a large degree acted as the champion of the Year of Music initiative, has said publicly and privately that an inspiration for the Year of Music was the Folklife Festival as well as the Social Power of Music. It was a nice coming together of a lot of factors.

OT: With this year’s focus on music and the shortened calendar, do you feel any pressure to differentiate it from other area music festivals?
SLM: Probably no more than yes. We have a commitment to do the Folklife Festival and what that means is engaging community, being researched-based and stoking larger conversations. In that way, we have a commitment and the pressure to do what we do, even if it’s two days. People should leave knowing that they had a festival moment.

OT: I feel like all music can carry social context, but what specifically were you focused on when piecing together this year’s programming?
SLM: It wasn’t about genres or songs; it was really about the way music and sound functions. How does music create community? It’s a natural environment, it’s a social environment, it’s all of those things. What I was hoping was to have the festival break open those ideas and surprise people. How are people actively using music and sound to create community and to connect with community? How do musicians make change where they think change is needed and lessen tensions when they think that’s needed? Our job as festival makers is to explore all of that with our visitors.


Folklife festival Must-Haves
Curiosity about the work of festival participants and staff
Quality time at our marketplace and food vendors
A good hat, sunscreen and water
A quiet moment in one of the Smithsonian’s museums
Music, music and more music


OT: What were some of the best parts about planning this particular festival despite the timeline?
SLM:
The theme has resonated with a lot of people and in some way, we knew it would be meaningful. But the response we’ve gotten both from the artists and the public has been positive. It’s allowed us to link to all sorts of people in community. Honestly, working as a staff, we’ve had to manage our own internal disappointment and frustration over the shutdown. But the fact that we’ve been able to focus on these two days, it’s reminded us of our mission and the opportunity we have to do this wonderful work.

OT: How do you go about identifying themes you want to hit on?
SLM:
One of the common denominators is trying to be relevant because of the way people think of folk and traditional arts as something old, dead, gone. There are a lot of ways those connect us to a shared humanity, and I don’t mean in a hyperbolic way. I really do think the interweaving of history, knowledge, skills and practice is something that’s very integral to what it means to be human. For us, our notion of folk is broad.

OT: Would you say that the battle for relevance is one of the tougher challenges?
SLM:
Mhmm. And money. [laughs] On a serious note, you’ve got to fight for attention. Say [there’s] this person weaving this beautiful grass basket from the Georgia Sea Islands or a singer delivering a devastating hip-hop song from a suburb of Paris; if they’re all in the same creative continuum, we want you to stand here and be present with us on the Mall.

OT: These festivals are great because they take a piece of the museum and put it in a more palatable platform. Do you feel a responsibility to spark interest in and push more people toward the more traditional settings?
SLM:
We try to make the festival very participatory so they can have a conversation or get their hands dirty and make a clay pot. We focus on the reflection of our own culture too; it’s not just you go to the Mall and have a good time [and] then you leave. Can we set up these environments where people carry things away from them that speak to their own lives? It’s a feedback loop we’re trying to facilitate. We take a lot of responsibility and we think about it all the time. Some of it is you just throw the seeds out there and they’ll bloom five or 10 years from now, and we may never know it.

The Smithsonian Folklife Festival takes place on Saturday, June 29 and Sunday, June 30. Features of this year’s The Social Power of Music-themed festival include Smithsonian Folkways Recordings musicians, Grammy-nominated rapper GoldLink, producer Ruby Ibarra and others. National Mall in DC; 202-633-6440; www.festival.si.edu

Photo: Ernie Tacsik // Haute Phototure

DC Festival Guide 2019

As the clouds dissipate from the sky and make way for the sun to illuminate the world, tents and stages begin to roll out for perhaps the most vibrant time of the year: festival season. From big to small, festivals represent inviting areas for people to mingle in areas meant to incite enthusiasm and joy. Luckily for us, residents of the DMV live in one of the most fertile grounds for these events in the country, whether you’re looking to chow down on fare at the Giant National Capital Barbecue Battle or want to dance to pure exhaustion at Funk Parade and DC101’s Kerfuffle. Over the next few pages, we’ve collected an extensive list of some of the very best the region has to offer with details on what to expect from each, plus interviews with local festival makers and some of our top picks.


THURSDAY, MAY 2 – SUNDAY, MAY 12

Pow! Wow! DC
Since 2016, artists from the DC region and around the globe – a different mix each year, lead by DC’s very own Kelly Towles – have come to NoMa for 10 days in May to create larger-than-life murals that enliven buildings and streetscapes. The 10-day celebration of art features a kickoff event at Wunder Garten, mural walking tours and more. Various dates, times and locations; www.nomabid.org/pow-wow-dc

FRIDAY, MAY 3 – SUNDAY, MAY 5

M3 Rock Festival
Now in its 11th year, M3 Rock Festival has grown from up-and-comer to a definitive way to party like it’s 1989. Start with the annual Kix-Off Party on Friday, and head into the festival on Saturday and Sunday. M3 features enough hard rock and hair metal bands to make your head spin. Lineup includes Dokken, Whitesnake, Autograph and Vince Neil. Various times. Tickets are $80-$255. Merriweather Post Pavilion: 10475 Little Patuxent Pkwy. Columbia, MD; www.merriweathermusic.com

Sleepy Creek Spring Dig
Returning for its sixth year, this annual campout offers a stellar line up of local roots music and national superstars. Other attractions include playgrounds, parades, face painting, food, arts and crafts, late night bonfires and open jam circles. Sleepy Creek events remain dedicated to providing fun for all ages and creating memories that last a lifetime. Early arrival party with Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers starts at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday 12:30 p.m. – 1 a.m. Sunday open mic party. Exit by 5 p.m. Tickets are $60-$100. Free admission for kids 15 and under. Sleepy Creek on the Potomac: Joshua Lane in Berkeley Springs, WV; www.sleepycreekpresents.com

SATURDAY, MAY 4

Kingman Island Bluegrass and Folk Festival
Join DC’s signature folk festival in its 10th year with headliners Dustbowl Revival, The Ballroom Thieves and Hackensaw Boys, along with a host of other featured artists. Celebrate spring at this Best of DC 2018 award-winning festival with amazing local talent, tremendous local merchants and the natural beauty of the nation’s capital. 12-8 p.m. Tickets are $35-$100. Kingman Island Bluegrass and Folk Festival: 575 Oklahoma Ave. NE, DC; www.kingmanislandbluegrass.info

SATURDAY, MAY 4 – SUNDAY, MAY 5

National Wine & Food Festival
A world class, waterfront culinary event! Join in the excitement of the 11th annual Wine and Food Festival at National Harbor; bringing together world-renowned chefs, artisanal craftsmen and culinary pioneers with thousands of Metro DC’s foodies. 12-6 p.m. Tickets begin at $40. National Harbor Waterfront: 804 National Harbor Blvd. National Harbor, MD; www.wineandfoodnh.com

SUNDAY, MAY 5

Fiesta Asia Silver Spring
Fiesta Asia Silver Spring brings together diverse Asian cultures on one street, where participants can experience the richness of the arts and tradition the region has to offer. Happenings include live performances, open market exhibitors, interactive displays, dance, music and much more. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free to attend. Fiesta Asia Silver Spring: 916 Ellsworth Dr. Silver Spring, MD; www.fiestaasia.org

FRIDAY, MAY 10 – SUNDAY, MAY 12

Preakness Balloon Festival
The Howard County Fairgrounds will brighten the skies this year as the centerpiece venue for the long-running balloon festival. Spectators will enjoy the wonder of hot air balloons, specialty crafts, entertainment and good food during this family-friendly festival. Friday  4-9 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Sunday Mother’s Day Morning Balloon Flight 6:15-7:45 a.m. Balloon ride tickets are $250. Howard County Fairgrounds: 2210 Fairgrounds Rd. West Friendship, MD; www.preaknessballoonfestival.com

SATURDAY, MAY 11

Maryland Craft Beer Festival
Celebrate your favorite Maryland breweries at the Maryland Craft Beer Festival. More than 40 local breweries will present nearly 200 unique, finely crafted ales and lagers. There will be live music, delicious food and fun craft vendors. 12-5 p.m. Tickets are $40, with $15 designated driver tickets available. Carroll Creek Linear Park: 44 South Market St. Frederick, MD; www.mdcraftbeerfestival.com

Of Ale and History Beer Fest
Find more than 50 beers available for tasting including European imports, American craft brews, hard ciders and specialty beers at the longest running beer festival in Virginia. Enjoy live music all day from Mojo Mothership and The Robbie Limon Band. Admission includes a souvenir glass, eight tastings and access to all vendors. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. At the gate, tasting tickets will be $30. Designated drivers or guests under 21 may purchase admission tickets for $10, including two non-alcoholic beverages. Belle Grove Plantation: 336 Belle Grove Rd. Middletown, VA; www.bellegrove.org

SATURDAY, MAY 11 – SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Virginia Renaissance Faire
Find music and dancing, shops filled with the finest crafts, and a variety of foods and beverages at the Virginia Renaissance Faire. Join the militia in pike drills or present a case in the Court of Common Pleas. Entertainment and vendors to be announced. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets are $12. Free admission for kids 6 and under. Lake Anna Winery: 5621 Courthouse Rd. Spotsylvania, VA; www.varf.org

THURSDAY, MAY 16 – SATURDAY, MAY 18

Domefest
Head to the lineup page to view all of the bands playing at Domefest 2019 alongside Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Aqueous, Magic Beans, Litz, Mungion, Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers, The Fritz and more. Stay tuned to social media for fun updates including themes, late night acts and workshop information. Gates open Thursday at 1 p.m. and close Sunday 2 p.m. Tickets are $135. Marvin’s Mountaintop: Masontown, WV; www.domefestival.com

FRIDAY, MAY 17

SAVOR: An American Craft Beer & Food Experience
A must-attend for craft beer aficionados and foodies alike, SAVOR offers a memorable craft beer and food experience to a limited number of guests in a truly unique atmosphere. At SAVOR, 90 small and independent craft breweries from around the country showcase 181 beers, each one thoughtfully paired with a small plate that will dazzle your palate. 7:30-11 p.m. Tickets $135. National Building Museum: 401 F St. NW, DC; www.savorcraftbeer.com

FRIDAY, MAY 17 – SUNDAY, MAY 19

Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival
Festival attendees will enjoy viewing inspiring and innovative art in a wide variety of media and styles, interacting directly with artists from around the country, and exploring their own creativity in the Family Art Park, featuring free face painting and balloon animals. Expect to get a festival guide with more than $100 worth of coupons. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free to attend. Reston Town Center: 11900 Market St. Reston, VA; www.restonarts.org/fineartsfestival

Riverrock
From music to mud pits, bikes to beer, SUPs to pups, and climbing to kayaks – it’s uniquely Richmond! Rock the day and night away, watch professional athletes thrill the crowd, and maybe even get a little dirty yourself.  Friday 5-9:30 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Ticket prices vary. Historic Tredegar: 500 Tredegar St. Richmond, VA; www.riverrockva.com

Spring Wine Festival & Sunset Tour
Celebrate the history of wine in Virginia with exclusive evening tours of the mansion and cellars, more than 20 Virginia wineries, and live music overlooking views of the estate and the Potomac River. 6-9 p.m. Tickets are $42-$48. Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens: 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Hwy. Mt. Vernon, VA; www.mountvernon.org

SATURDAY, MAY 18

Adventure Brewing Company 5th Anniversary Festival
This brewery birthday party features live music and local vendors. Event is pet-friendly. Check the website for daily updates on festival details. 12-10 p.m. Free to attend. Adventure Brewing Company: 33 Perchwood Dr. Fredericksburg, VA; www.adventurebrewing.com

Fiesta Asia Street Fair
The 13th annual National Asian Heritage Festival’s signature event, the Fiesta Asia Street Fair, features more than 1,000 performers on five stages representing more than 20 cultures. Enjoy outdoor craft exhibits, live performances, food and open market vendors, interactive displays, martial arts demonstrations, talent shows, cooking demos and many more. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Free to attend. Pennsylvania Avenue between 3rd and 6th Streets, NW, DC; www.fiestaasia.org

InfieldFest
InfieldFest is a full-day music festival that takes place amid one of the most anticipated and attended annual sporting events, the Preakness Stakes. The 2019 lineup features Norwegian DJ Kygo, Maryland’s own Logic, Diplo, Juice WRLD, Fisher and Frank Walker. 8 p.m. Tickets are $79-$199. Pimlico Race Course: 5201 Park Heights Ave. Baltimore, MD; www.infieldfest.com

SATURDAY, MAY 18

Pearl Street Preakness Party
Join Pearl Street for an official Preakness party, infield style. Party to live music from Lovely Rita, enter our hat contest, then catch the race on the big screen. The bars will be open and they’ll have plenty of Stella Artois and Black Eyed Susans. Must be 21 and over to consume alcohol. 4-7 p.m. Free to attend. Pearl Street in SW, DC; www.wharfdc.com

Sour Mania! Sour Beer Festival
Pucker up and join the 2nd Annual Sour Beer Festival. Sample special and limited edition sour ales from around the region and across the country at this indoor event. Enjoy live music and fantastic food while sipping some truly tart ales. Starts at 11 a.m. Admission is free, samplers and snacks available to purchase. Mad Fox Brewing Company: 444 W Broad St. Falls Church, VA; www.madfoxbrewing.com

Virginia Wine & Craft Festival
Grab a drink and hit the caves. Relax and enjoy shopping for handmade crafts from over 100 vendors, artists and crafters from all over the East Coast, listen to live music, play games and try wine from 20 different wineries. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free to attend, $25-$30 for wine tasting. Historic Downtown Front Royal: 106 Chester St. Front Royal, VA;www.wineandcraftfestival.com

SATURDAY, MAY 18 – SUNDAY, MAY 19

Wine in the Woods
The 27th Annual Wine in the Woods is the largest wine festival in Maryland and continues to rank among the best festivals in Howard County. Sample a variety of Maryland’s finest wineries from a souvenir glass, purchase food from an abundance of high quality restaurants and caterers, attend wine education seminars, purchase art and specialty crafts, and revel in continuous live entertainment from the Unified Jazz Ensemble, Bad Influence and I&I Riddim. Saturday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $25-$44. Symphony Woods Park: 10475 Little Patuxent Pkwy. Columbia, MD; www.wineinthewoods.com

SUNDAY, MAY 19

Porchfest DC – Southeast Edition
Porchfest is a festival of mini-concerts held on front porches. The Southeast Porchfest embodies the life and soul of DC, spotlighting the region’s top emerging talent and is an outing for the entire family! With well-manicured lawns, tree-lined streets and super friendly residents, Hillcrest is the perfect choice for the 2019 Southeast Porchfest. This year’s line-up includes spoken word performances and bands representing all music genres, including: jazz, folk, rock, hip-hop and go-go. There will also be food trucks, vendors and more! Please bring a lawn chair, walking shoes and cash to tip the performers. For updates, follow @porchfestdc on Instagram. The map of the final performance route will be published the second week of May. 12-6 p.m. Free to attend. The Hillcrest community in SE DC; www.porchfestdc.com

SUNDAY, MAY 19

DC Polo Society
Are you on the list?
www.dcpolo.com

THURSDAY, MAY 23 – SUNDAY, MAY 26

DelFest
With acts like The Del McCoury Band and The Travelin McCourys, this family-friendly music festival is pure bluegrass bliss. You’ll find incredible music all day long on multiple stage, intimate artist playshops, late night shows, a fun-filled kidzone, a quality art and craft faire, delicious food and drinks, plentiful camping space and RV hookups, and much more. Various times and performances each day. Various ticket packages available. Allegany County Fairgrounds: 11400 Moss Ave. Cumberland, MD; www.delfest.com

FRIDAY, MAY 24 – MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2

SummerFest at Gaylord National
The Capital Region’s premier waterfront resort, Gaylord National, comes alive with Summer FUN!  Overnight guests can enjoy resort entertainment and activities as part of their annual SummerFest. From outdoor events and great music to campfire stories, scavenger hunts, seasonal cocktails and more, there is something for everyone. Whether you are visiting the DC area to sightsee, a family looking for a getaway or a great night out with friends, you will find everything you need to make your summer getaway memorable. Various times. Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center: 201 Waterfront St. National Harbor, MD; www.marriott.com

SATURDAY, MAY 25 – SUNDAY, MAY 26

Caribbean Wine, Music and Food Festival
Listen to steel drums and reggae beats while enjoying arts and crafts, great food and the island vibes of this wine festival. Open your palate to unique Linganore wines and take home a souvenir wine glass. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $25. Linganore Wine Cellars: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, MD; www.linganore-wine.com

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 – SATURDAY, JUNE 2

Focus on the Story Festival
Focus on the Story is an independent, nonpartisan, non-profit organization based in DC, founded on the driving principle that photography can spark meaningful conversations at the intersection of policy, civic engagement and visual storytelling. Join in the nation’s capital as they celebrate the art of photography and the stories behind the images with talks, workshops, portfolio reviews, exhibits, contests and photo walks about everything from Brutalist architecture to the White House. Various times and locations. Registration is $225-$245. Student rates available. www.focusonthestory.org

THURSDAY, MAY 30 – SATURDAY, JUNE 2

Mountain Music Festival
Mountain Music Festival is an annual celebration of the best outdoor adventures West Virginia has to offer, with live music to match. Situated on a 1,500-acre outdoor adventure resort in the New River Gorge, Mountain Music Festival brings the spirit of Appalachia to life through its two greatest exports: music and wilderness. This year, Mountain Music Fest welcomes Tyler Childers, The Floozies, Big Something and many more to the stage atop Wonderland Mountain. Tickets are $79-$329. ACE Adventure Resort: 1 Concho Rd. Minden, WV; www.mountainmusicfestwv.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 1

Great Grapes Wine & Food Festival
Great Grapes! has grown to be Baltimore’s premier casual Maryland wine festival with live music, fun festival eats, arts and crafts, and a free kids’ area. Grab a souvenir glass and stroll from tent to tent, sipping and savoring selections from more than 150 different international and local wines, beers and spirits at Oregon Ridge Park. 1-8 p.m. Tickets are $40-$75. Oregon Ridge Park: 13401 Beaver Dam Rd. Cockeysville, MD;www.uncorkthefun.com

Takoma Trukgarten
Don’t miss Takoma Trukgarten featuring local beer, food trucks and live music. This one-day beer festival features local breweries pouring over 20 different craft beers plus cider and a new wine tent. There will be local restaurants and food trucks plus live music all day! 12-5 p.m. Tickets are $25-$45. City Parking Lot: 201 Ethan Allen Ave. Takoma Park, MD; www.mainstreettakoma.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 – SUNDAY, JUNE 2

FSGW Washington Folk Festival
The 39th Annual Washington Folk Festival showcases the diversity of traditional music in the DC area. All musicians, storytellers, dancer and craftspeople live in the greater DMV metropolitan area and volunteer their talents to put on a first-class festival of national renown. 12-7 p.m. both days. Free to attend. Glen Echo Park: 7300 MacArthur Blvd. Glen Echo, MD; www.fsgw.org

Vintage Virginia
Since 1982, Vintage Virginia has offered an opportunity to taste from nearly half of Virginia’s homegrown wineries, from the most renowned to the new and exciting. Saturday 12-6 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets cost $40-$65. Bull Run Special Events Center: 7700 Bull Run Dr. Centreville, VA; www.vintagevirginia.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 2

Taste of Peru DC
Taste of Peru celebrates the cultural influences and the creativity of Peruvian chefs all over the United States. The event promotes the unique culinary perspectives of local and international chefs. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $15-$40. University of the District of Columbia: 4200 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.tasteofperudc.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 – SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Capital Jazz Fest
Come see Gladys Knight, Babyface, Gregory Porter, India.Arie, Marsha Ambrosius and more jazz and soul musicians at Merriweather Post Pavilion’s Capital Jazz Fest. Enjoy fine arts and crafts at the festival marketplace and culinary treats from the food court, plus artist workshops, plus meet and greets. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Friday. Doors open at 10 a.m. both Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are $59.50-$129.50. Merriweather Post Pavilion: 10475 Little Patuxent Pkwy. Columbia, MD; www.merriweathermusic.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 – SUNDAY, JUNE 16

DC JazzFest
The DC JazzFest invites you to explore the exceptional array of renowned masters and emerging artists from across the jazz spectrum and beyond. Find your favorite artists and various performances located throughout the District, including The Wharf and even in your own neighborhood through the Jazz in the ’Hoods concert series. Various showtimes, ticket prices and venues. Various locations in DC; www.dcjazzfest.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

Breaux Vineyards Cajun Festival
Come join your Cajun cousins at Breaux Vineyards the 22nd Annual Cajun Festival.  Enjoy wine tastings, craft vendors, Cajun fare for sale, and more at this annual celebration. Starting off the day, the festival will feature live music with the Voodoo Blues followed by The Dixie Power Trio for the rest of the afternoon. Kid-friendly activities will be available. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $20. Breaux Vineyards: 36888 Breaux Vineyards Ln. Purcellville, VA; www.breauxvineyards.com

Summerfest DC
Get your own tasting glass and enjoy more than 80 carefully selected craft beers in a single afternoon. Enjoy live music, unlimited wine and cider tastings and amazing food selections. Then get active with outdoor games, arts and activities. This is a 21 and over only event. Various times and ticket prices. The Bullpen: 1201 Half St. SE, DC; www.summerfestdc.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Capital Pride Festival
Join the LGBTQ+ community, on America’s Mainstreet for the 2019 Capital Pride Festival presented by Live! Casino & Hotel. Enjoy a full day of entertainment, music, food, drink, education and celebration. The Pride Festival includes three stages of national and local talent, and will host 300 exhibitors including local community groups and businesses, food vendors, and organizations looking to promote their products and services to our community. 12-10 p.m. Free to attend, VIP packages are available for purchase. Pennsylvania Avenue & 3rd Street in NW, DC; www.capitalpride.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 15

5th Annual Baltimore Wine Fest
Join b Scene Events for the 5th Annual Baltimore Wine Fest at the picturesque Canton Waterfront Park. Experience 160+ wines from around the world, gourmet eats provided by local eateries, live music, chef cooking demonstrations, wine seminars, craft beers and spirits, unique shopping and a family zone. 12-7 p.m. Tickets are $15-$89. Canton Waterfront Park: 3001 Boston St. Baltimore, MD; www.baltimorewinefest.com

Beer, Bourbon and BBQ
Enjoy beer, bourbon, music, cigars and barbecue. Admission buys you a souvenir glass, so you can enjoy an all-you-care-to-taste sampling of the 60 beers and 40 bourbons on tap. The amazing barbecue selection includes the Shrine of Swine, featuring pulled pork right from the source. There’s also live rock and blues music all day. Additionally, the event comes to Leesburg in October. Tickets are $75-$119. 12-6 p.m. on Saturday. The Plateau at National Harbor: 165 Waterfront St. National Harbor, MD; www.beerandbourbon.com

FreeState Beer, Wine and Seafood Festival
Find the area’s best seafood, Maryland craft brewers, Linganore wines, awesome live music, and a special appearance by Justin Schlegel of Justin, Scott and Spiegel on 98 Rock at the Freestate Beer, Wine and Seafood Festival. Purchase a VIP ticket and receive a larger souvenir glass and access to an exclusive private area that includes indoor bathrooms. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $35-$50. Linganore Winecellars: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, MD; www.linganorewines.com

Silver Spring Blues Festival
Enjoy this all-day blues block party with two stages, a fountain to cool off in and plenty of places to eat and shop at the music-filled celebration in downtown Silver Spring. 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. Free to attend. 921 Wayne Ave. Silver Spring, MD; www.silverspringbluesfest.yolasite.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 15 – SUNDAY, JUNE 23

By the People
By the People is a new, inclusive, international arts and innovation festival that facilitates connection and celebrates creativity. Enjoy fun and free arts installations, performances, talks and programs about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The Smithsonian will have extended evening hours on June 23, and augmented reality art at each of the festival sites. Various times. Free to attend. Various locations in DC; www.halcyonhouse.org/by-the-people

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 – SUNDAY, JUNE 23

AFI DOCS
AFI DOCS is the nation’s documentary film festival known for showcasing the best in documentary filmmaking from the US and around the world. AFI DOCS is also the only film festival in the United States that offers the unique opportunity to connect film audiences with national opinion leaders, filmmakers and intriguing film subjects. With conversations and experiences you won’t experience at any other film festival, AFI DOCS harnesses the power of this important art form and its potential to inspire change. Screenings during this annual five-day event take place in landmark venues in DC and the world-class AFI Silver Theatre, the independent film hub of the metropolitan region. Tickets are $50-$275. Various locations and times; www.afi.com/afidocs

THURSDAY, JUNE 20 – MONDAY, JUNE 24

Capital Congress
Capital Congress is the largest Salsa Festival in the DC area. Since 2005, thousands have come to DC to dance Salsa and other Latin styles in this family-friendly environment. Instructors from around the world teach daily dance workshops to all levels. All ages welcome. Various times. Tickets $110-$350. The Hilton Mark Center: 5000 Seminary Rd. Alexandria, VA; www.capitalcongress.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 21 – SUNDAY, JUNE 23

Firefly Music Festival
Your favorite summer weekend is just around the corner. Three days, several stages and countless bands. Artists include Panic! At The Disco, Tyler, The Creator, Courtney Barnett, Travis Scott, Passion Pit, Post Malone and many more. Various show times and ticket prices ranging from single-day camping passes to weekend passes. The Woodlands in Dover, DE; www.fireflyfestival.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 – SUNDAY, JUNE 23

27th Annual Giant National Capital BBQ Battle
Kick off summer at America’s barbecue party, the 27th annual Giant Barbecue Battle. Pennsylvania Avenue will be smokin’ with rock, reggae, jazz and blues from 30 bands on three stages. Cookbook authors and celebrity chefs like Myron Mixon, Moe Cason and Tuffy Stone of Destination America’s popular “BBQ Pitmasters” will entertain and educate with cooking demonstrations on the popular Giant Demonstration Stage. Enjoy free barbecue and grilled food samples in the Taste of Giant sampling pavilion while witnessing America’s best eaters onstage at Nathan’s famous hot dog-eating contest. Other activities include Anheuser-Busch beer gardens, and Giant Corks to Caps Microbrew and Wine Tasting tent. This year’s Capital BBQ Battle will raise funds for USO of Metropolitan Washington with the Capital Area Food Bank. Saturday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Tickets are $12-$155. Pennsylvania Avenue between 3rd and 7th Streets in NW, DC; www.bbqindc.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 – SUNDAY, JUNE 30

Smithsonian Folklife Festival
This festival honors contemporary living cultural traditions and celebrates those who practice and sustain them. Produced annually by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the festival has featured participants from all 50 states and more than 100 countries. This year’s festival will focus on the social power of music. Experience living traditions from around the world, as the festival works with communities to strengthen and preserve their cultures and share them with you on the National Mall. Festival hours and events TBD. Free to attend. The National Mall: www.festival.si.edu

TUESDAY, JULY 9 – SUNDAY, JULY 28

Capital Fringe Festival
Capital Fringe will showcase seven venues with 13 stages, all within walking distance of each other in Southwest DC, presenting more than 94 highly-ambitious productions with 60 percent of the participating artists residing in the DC Metro area. With countless performing groups, there’s bound to be something for everybody from theatre to dance, including risky art and nontraditional acts. Tickets are $72-$500 and go on sale June 17. The Logan Fringe Arts Space: 1358 Florida Ave. NE, DC; www.capitalfringe.org

SUNDAY, JULY 14

Silver Spring Arts & Crafts Summer Fair
Check out the Silver Spring Arts & Crafts Fair this summer, featuring arts and crafts, food and beverage vendors, a cultural dance show with performances from different countries around the world and many fun family activities. 2-8 p.m. Free to attend. Silver Spring Veterans Plaza: 1 Veterans Pl. Silver Spring, MD; www.chiceventsdc.com

FRIDAY, JULY 19 – SUNDAY, JULY 21

ARTSCAPE 2019
Check out fashion designers, outdoor sculpture, photography and art cars at America’s largest free arts festival. Experience the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and other incredible live music on outdoor stages. Expect to see a delicious international menu of food and beverages available throughout the festival. Times TBD. Free to attend. Various locations in Baltimore, MD; www.artscape.org

SATURDAY, JULY 20 – SUNDAY, JULY 21

Summer Reggae Wine Festival
Shop the open-air market with hand-crafted and imported goods from around the world. Enjoy a day sampling delicious wines and listening to live bands. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $20-$25. Linganore Winecellars: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, MD; www.linganorewines.com

 WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 – SUNDAY, JULY 28

FloydFest
FloydFest 19: Voyage Home is five days of music, magic and mountains in the picturesque paradise at Milepost 170.5 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Floyd, VA. The festival features outdoor adventure, vibrant and varied vendors, quality brews and chews, healing arts, workshops and whimsy, children’s activities and a lineup featuring more than 100 artists on eight stages. Various times for each day. Single, multi and camping passes available for various prices. 894 Rock Castle Gorge Rd. Floyd, VA; www.floydfest.com

 SATURDAY, JULY 27

Trifecta Food Truck Festival
More than 35 of Maryland’s best food trucks will transform the racetrack into a festive playground with live bands, local craft beer tents, mechanical bull rides, a dunk tank, a pie-eating contest, a kids’ play land, moon bounces, a local artist village and more. 12-11 p.m. Tickets $15. Maryland State Fairgrounds: 2200 York Rd. Lutherville-Timonium, MD;
www.mt.cm/trifecta-food-truck-festival

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10 – SUNDAY, AUGUST 11

Moonrise Festival
Since its debut in 2014, Moonrise Festival has grown into one of the most anticipated East Coast festivals of the summer, touching all corners of the dance floor with styles spanning from heavy-hitting bass to hip hop, live electronic acts to house music, and everything in between. The event also features art installations, a sprawling vendor village, amazing food and beverages, stylish VIP lounges and more. 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. both days. Tickets are $149.50-$239.50. Pimlico Race Course: 5201 Park Heights Ave. Baltimore, MD; www.moonrisefestival.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 11

Taste of Linganore
Presented by Linganore Winecellars & Red Shedman Farm Brewery, this event will showcase some of the area’s favorite restaurateurs and caterers, featuring samplings of small plates made with Linganore Wines. Stroll the grounds to shop unique local vendors while enjoying this foodie paradise, paired with great wines and craft beers.  11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets are $10-$15. Linganore Winecellars: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, MD; www.linganorewines.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 17

Around the World Cultural Food Festival
Around the World Cultural Food Festival brings together diverse, authentic, living traditions from different countries around the world. Their mission is to preserve and strengthen the culture of each country by giving all participants a chance to learn from one another and understand their cultural differences. Expect to see one restaurant for each country. Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Free to attend; VIP tickets are available for $25-$35. Freedom Plaza: 1455 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.aroundtheworldfestival.com

Hot August Festival
The exciting music lineup this year includes Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Turkuaz, Billy Strings, Dirty Grass Players and more. Gates open at 11 a.m. Tickets are $58-$199. Oregon Ridge Park: 13401 Beaver Dam Rd. Cockeysville, MD; www.hotaugustfestival.com\

Kegs and Corks Festival
Head to the Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds for the 8th Annual Kegs and Corks Festival, a beer and wine festival featuring 16 craft breweries and 16 Maryland wineries along with great music, good food and a variety of arts and crafts vendors. Unlimited samplings, live music and souvenir glass included. 12-7 p.m. Tickets are $25-$120. Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds: 1450 Generals Hwy. Crownsville, MD; www.kegsandcorksfest.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 22- SUNDAY, AUGUST 25

LOCKN’ Festival
Jam band fans: it may not get better than this. Two nights and four sets of Dead & Company, and three nights of awesome music from Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Revivalists, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Old Crow Medicine Show, Gary Clark Jr. and so much more. The stellar lineup is only matched by the beautiful setting in the mountains of Virginia. Various times. Tickets are $229-$289. Infinity Downs Farm: 1510 Diggs Mountain Rd. Arrington, VA;www.locknfestival.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24

Chesapeake Crab & Beer Festival
This annual festival is an all-you-can-taste extravaganza complete with over 30,000 crabs, lots of beer, arts and crafts, live music, family fun and more. 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. for session one, 5-9 p.m. for session two. Tickets are $40-$125. The Waterfront at SouthPointe National Harbor: 804 National Harbor Blvd. National Harbor, MD; www.mdcrabfest.com

Cigar, Bourbon and Beer Festival
Join for an amazing day of cigars, bourbon and craft beer. Hogshead Cigar Lounge will be showcasing all kinds of different cigars from their lounge. Explore a showcase of bourbons from all across the country and some from right there in Virginia. Check out some of their fine spirits they offer like Jack Daniel’s, Wild Turkey and Old Forester, plus craft beers from local Fredericksburg breweries sampling some of their award-winning beers. 4-9 p.m. Tickets are $10-$50. Fredericksburg Fairgrounds: 2400 Airport Ave. Fredericksburg, VA; www.cigarbourbonbeer.com

World Heritage Festival & Festival of Kites
Taste delicious ethnic food, get refreshed with a scoop of ice cream or shaved ice or even a fresh smoothie while enjoying a cultural show on the main stage. You will have an array of vendors to choose from with more than 60 artists displaying everything from fine art to jewelry, ceramics to crafts and every creative item in between. Other vendors include area nonprofit organizations, entrepreneurs and local businesses. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free to attend. Ida Lee Park Recreation Center: 60 Ida Lee Dr. Leesburg, VA; www.chiceventsdc.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 31 – SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

Virginia Scottish Games
You can wear a kilt and bring your dog! The Scottish Games are one of the few places inside the Commonwealth where you can experience authentic Scottish culture and traditions, including spectacular highland dancers, bagpipes, adorable Scottish dogs, cool British cars and sheep herding. Gates open at 9 a.m. both Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are $20-$30. Great Meadow: 5089 Old Tavern Rd. The Plains, VA; www.vascottishgames.org

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

6th Annual Baltimore Seafood Fest
Baltimore loves its seafood, but Charm City also loves all the wonderful local restaurants that truly make Baltimore one of the best places for foodies to visit. Baltimoreans are so proud of their crab cakes, crab soup, shrimp salad, local oysters and of course, Maryland blue crabs. It seems fitting to host a waterfront festival showcasing some of Baltimore’s favorite restaurants serving their signature seafood dishes. 12-7 p.m. Tickets are $15-$95. Canton Waterfront Park: 3001 Boston St. Baltimore, MD; www.baltimoreseafoodfest.com

DC Wine Fest
Specially curated wineries serve patrons tastings over a multi-session, all-day, all-night vino experience. You’ll have the chance to sample premium wine to your heart’s content, while live entertainment keep the party lively during this one of a kind experience. 12-10 p.m. Tickets are $35-$60. National Union Building: 918 F St. NW, DC; www.dcwinefest.com

Virginia Cider Festival
At the Virginia Cider Festival, you and your friends will be surrounded by hard ciders from all across the country. The event will also feature even more Virginia Cider this year from cideries like Cobbler Mountain, Potter’s, Winchester CiderWorks and Bold Rock. There will be a list of more than 25 Cider producers who will be pouring over 50 ciders. Check out the local live music on the Safford of Fredericksburg stage for your listening pleasure. Be sure to check the weather for what to wear. The event will take place rain or shine. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets are $10-$30. Fredericksburg Fairgrounds: 2400 Airport Ave. Fredericksburg, VA; www.vaciderfest.com

SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 21

Arts & Ales: Downtown Hyattsville Arts Festival
Enjoy more than 100 exhibiting artists and artisans, Maryland breweries, food trucks and vendors and live entertainment block by block in Downtown Hyattsville. 12-6 p.m. Free to attend. Farragut Street, Gallatin Street and Church Alley in Hyattsville, MD; www.hyattsvilleartsfestival.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 – SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

Devils Backbone Hoopla Festival
Devils Backbone Brewing Company’s Hoopla Festival features live music, award-winning beer, camping and fun for the whole family. The weekend includes pop-up beer tastings, outdoor adventures, property tours, crafts, great eats and tons of incredible live music. Come check out the award-winning beer and bands, including Robert Walter’s 20th Congress, Kat Wright and the Jon Stickley Trio. Tickets $50-$340. Basecamp Brewpub and Meadows: 200 Mosbys Run, Roseland, VA; www.dbbrewingcompany.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5

Hops & Harvest Festival
A beer festival on the Columbia, MD lakefront with unlimited tastings of more than 50 beers from Maryland brewers. The festival also features cideries, artisans and live music. Tickets are $15-$40. Columbia Lakefront: 10275 Wincopin Cir. Columbia, MD; www.hopsandhavest.com

CONCERT SERIES

WEDNESDAY

Wednesdays at the Wharf Concert Series
June 5 – August 21
Head to The Wharf each Wednesday evening this summer to listen to live music on Transit Pier. Don’t miss DC favorites such as Collective Dellusion, Jarreau Williams Xperience, Brent & Co. and more playing on the floating stage. From indie rock to Latin fusion, there’s something for everyone. Enjoy ice cold beers and food from Cantina Bambina and take a mid-week break. 6-8 p.m. Free to attend. The Wharf: 700 Water St. SW, DC; www.wharfdc.com

THURSDAYS

Bethesda Summer Concert Series
May 16- June 13
Bask in the sweet melodies and the summer air as you catch the music in Veterans Park. Featuring local favorites like Brent & Co., Moxie Blues Band, 19th St. Band and more. 6-8 p.m. Free to attend. Veterans Park: 7898 Woodmont Ave. Bethesda, MD; www.bethesda.org

THURSDAYS

Rosslyn Rocks
June 6 – 27
Grab your friends and head to Central Place Plaza on Thursdays in June to listen to live music. Each week will be a new cover band, featuring Party Like It’s, White Ford Bronco, The Jarreau Williams Xperience and Driven to Clarity. Enjoy the concerts while sipping on a glass of wine or having a beer in downtown Rosslyn’s outdoor space. Must be 21+ (no outside alcohol). 6-8 p.m. Free to attend. Central Place Plaza: 1800 N Lynn St. Arlington, VA; www.rosslynva.org

FRIDAYS

Budweiser Terrace Pregame Concerts at Nationals Park
Select Fridays May to September
Every Friday home game, the best place to pregame is at the Budweiser Terrace inside the ballpark. Enjoy cold Bud and Bud Light and great tunes from local bands like Lovely Rita, Uncle Jesse  and Hand Painted Swinger. Concerts run from 5-6:50 p.m. First pitch is at 7:05 p.m. Nationals Park Bud Light Terrace: 1500 S. Capitol St. SE, DC; www.nationals.com

Farragut Fridays
May 31 – September 27
Farragut Fridays are a full day of getting outside in the Golden Triangle. Starting at 9 a.m., drop in for an outdoor “office” that includes free Wi-Fi, tables and chairs, and games to get your creative juices flowing. At noon, the picnic in the park begins. Grab a bite to eat, play lawn games (cornhole, foosball and table tennis), hang out with puppies and listen to live music. Then, head back after work for the Golden Cinema movie series. Pre-show fun starts at 7 p.m. Free to attend. Farragut Park: Connecticut Avenue and K Street in NW, DC; www.goldentriangledc.com

Fridays at Fort Totten
June 7 – Aug 23
The Fridays at Fort Totten Summer Concert Series is every Friday through August 23. Come out and enjoy delicious bites from a featured food truck each week, and amazing live music from Of Tomorrow, Sol Roots, Cecily, Oh He Dead and so many more. There’s a new band and tasty food truck each Friday. We hope to see you there. In partnership with The Modern at Art Place. 6-8 p.m. The Modern: Corner of South Dakota Avenue and Galloway Street, NE, DC; www.fridaysforttotten.com

Friday Night Concerts in Yards Park
June 7 – August 30
Spend your Friday night relaxing in the Capitol Riverfront, voted one of DC’s best places for live music!  Spread a blanket, grab a cold one and get down with some great local music. Enjoy bands like the Shane Gamble Band, 7 Deadlies, Brent & Co., Aztec Sun and more on the boardwalk stage. The featured artists are fun for the whole family, and ice cold Corona beers and wine will be available on-site at the outdoor tented bar. 7-9 p.m. Free to attend. Yards Park: 355 Water St. SE, DC; www.capitolriverfront.org

Herndon Friday Night Live!
May 3 – August 23
Enjoy another year of Herndon Rock’s cold beer, hot tunes and fantastic food during the summer. Featuring party favorites Garden State Radio, Here’s to the Night, The Stormin’ Norman Band and more, Herndon takes you through the summer with the best local and regional talent from the East Coast. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Free to attend. Town Green: 777 Lynn St. Herndon, VA; www.herndonrocks.com

Lubber Run Amphitheater Summer Concert Series
June 14 – August 11
This year’s 50th anniversary summer concert series features a diverse lineup of internationally renowned musicians and regional favorites. Friday and Saturday shows at 8 p.m., and Sunday shows at 11 a.m. Free to attend. Lubber Run Amphitheater: North Columbus and 2nd Streets, Arlington, VA; www.arlingtonarts.org

Rio Concert Series
May 25 – September 28
Every Saturday night, the party is lakeside at the Rio Center boardwalk. Just outside the Union Jack’s and near the paddle boards, enjoy live music from Handpainted Swinger, Soctt Kurt & Memphis 59, City Groove and more. 6-9 p.m. Free to attend. Rio Washingtonian Center: 209 Boardwalk Pl. Gaithersburg, MD; www.riowashingtonian.com

Rock the Block
May 24, June 28, July 26, August 23, September 27 and October 25
Rock the Block at Old Town Square in Fairfax is back this summer. Each fourth Friday of the month from June through October, walk, run, ride your bike or drive because you don’t want to miss out on The Rockets, JunkFood, The Reflex and more. Food and drink vendors will be onsite. Bring chairs or blankets to sit on, and kids can wear swimsuits and bring towels for the splash pad. No pets allowed except service animals. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Old Town Square: 10415 North St. Fairfax, VA; www.fairfaxva.gov/government/parks-recreation/rock-the-block

Tarara Winery Summer Concert Series
May 25 – October 5
Named the Best Music Festival by Northern Virginia Magazine, the Tarara Summer Concert Series celebrates 20 years in 2019 as one of the most eagerly anticipated outdoor events of the season in Loudoun. Dance under the stars on Saturday nights this summer to the sounds of your favorite cover bands, such as The Reflex, Gonzo’s Nose, The Legwarmers, Bruce in the USA, Crack the Sky, Three Sheets to the Wind and more. Tarara Winery: 13648 Tarara Ln. Leesburg, VA; www.tarara.com

MOVIE NIGHTS

TUESDAYS

Adams Morgan Movie Nights
May 21 – June 18
The Adams Morgan BID is excited to announce this year’s Adams Morgan Movie Nights lineup as they celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing by collaborating with the National Air and Space Museum to bring you five great space-themed titles, including Armageddon and Spaceballs, and a few surprises along the way. Each movie starts at 8 p.m. Free to attend. Marie Reed Soccer Field: 18th and California Streets, NW, DC; www.admodc.org/movies

WEDNESDAYS

NoMa Summer Screen
June 5 – August 21
This season marks the 12 of NoMa’s Summer Screen series, one of the longest-running free public events in the neighborhood. This year features a fun lineup of sports-related films including The Karate Kid, Bend It Like Beckham, Remember the Titans and Bring It On. Each film begins at approximately 8:30 p.m. Free to attend. 1150 First St. NE, DC; www.nomabid.org

THURSDAYS

Canal Park Movies
June 13 – August 22
From classics to the latest Academy Award winners, the people spoke and the movies will be shown! Join the Riverfront community for free movies at Canal Park on Thursday evenings. Films this year include: Crazy Rich Asians, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, The Goonies and more. Movies begin at sundown. Free to attend. Canal Park: 200 M St. SE, DC; www.capitolriverfront.org

Tunes in the Triangle
May 30,  June 6, June 20, August 6, September 5
Stop by Milian Park on select Thursdays this summer with your friends, family and/or pets for free live concerts from great local bands. 499 Massachusetts Ave NW, DC; www.mvtcid.org

FRIDAYS

Burgeoning Crystal City Bid
Crystal City has been in the news a lot lately, and there’s definitely plenty to talk about. Just minutes from downtown DC, the greater Crystal City area (consisting of the Crystal City, Pentagon City and Potomac Yard-Arlington neighborhoods) is the largest walkable downtown in Virginia, with 12-million square feet of office, 15,000 residents, 5,900 hotel rooms, and almost 500 restaurants and retailers. In addition to experiential retail like Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and Bowlero opening in the near future, Crystal City has more than 250 events each year. From weekly live music outside at the Crystal City Water Park to the Twilighter 5K, there’s always fun to be had in Crystal City. For more information on events and happenings, visit www.crystalcity.org.

Rosslyn Cinema with Pub in the Park
June 7 – July 12
Every Friday this summer in Gateway Park, bring a blanket or low chairs and a group of friends to enjoy a night under the stars with your favorite movies. Movies start at dusk, but the fun starts at 5 p.m. with games and the Pub in the Park. Movies this year include Spider Man: into the Spider-Verse, Crazy Rich Asians and more. This event is kid- and dog-friendly. 5 p.m. Free to attend. Gateway Park: 1300 Lee Hwy. Arlington, VA; www.rosslynva.org

FRIDAYS

Union Market Drive-In
May 3 – October 4
The drive-in at Union Market is back for a new season! The first Friday of every month will feature classics like Con-Air and Jaws,  and recent films like Coco. There’s a film for everyone. The lot opens at 6 p.m., and films will start at 7:30 p.m. $15 parking fee; free walk-ups. Union Market: 1309 5th St. NE, DC; www.unionmarketdc.com

Off the Beaten Path Events

No matter where your interests lie, you can bet there’s a festival catering to the more specific interests of DMV denizens. Our list below points you in the direction of the cool, the quirky and the oddly specific for prime opportunities to celebrate with fellow whatever-your-thing-is enthusiasts.

SATURDAY, MAY 4

Unicorn Festival at Hogback Mountain Pony Rides
This festival has been voted Most Loved Place to Go by Leesburg-Ashburn Hulafrog for 2018 and  2019. It includes Pony rides, unicorn photos by Chris Weber Studios, face painting with Painted Sunshine, vendors and so much more.11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets begin at $20. Hogback Mountain Pony Rides: 19732 Hogback Mountain Rd. Leesburg, VA; www.hogbackmountainponyrides.com

National Math Festival
Don’t miss the 2019 National Math Festival. This all-ages event brings today’s most fascinating mathematicians together for a variety of presentations, performances, short creative films, and hands-on puzzles, games, art-making, mathletic competitions and more. See how math connects to what you love.Film animation, pro football, magic, music, dating, dance, art, cryptography, planet earth….whatever your interest, they’ve got the math for that. Free to attend. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Walter E. Washington Convention Center: 801 Mount Vernon Pl. NW, DC; www.msri.org

SATURDAY, MAY 11

Baltimore Hot Sauce Festival
Sample 30+ of the region’s tastiest hot sauces. This event also features spicy Maryland indie and alternative rock on stage, with performances by Outcalls, Thunder Club, Sgt Gusto and more. Don’t miss delectable food, themed drinks and saucy games. 12-8 p.m. Tickets are $15-$45, and there is a $5 surcharge at the door for guests under 21 years old. All guests will be carded upon entry, so don’t forget your IDs. Power Plant Live!: 34 Market Pl. Baltimore, MD; www.powerplantlive.com

Taiwan Bubble Tea Festival
The Taiwan Bubble Tea Festival is a family- and kid-friendly fun event, open to all. The festival will be held at the Rockville Town Square. In addition to providing a variety of name-sake bubble teas, the festival will have education and outreach opportunities that strengthen social connections in the community. The festival will display rich Asian culture through live performances, crafts, arts and delicious traditional cuisines. This year, six different bubble tea vendors will be coming from the DMV area including Bubble & Tea, Sharetea, Bobapop, Gong-Cha, Tea-Do and Momo’s Cafe. 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Free with registration, and tasting cards are available to purchase on-site for $5, cash only. Rockville Town Square: 30 Maryland Ave. Rockville, MD; www.rockvillemd.gov

SATURDAY, MAY 18

Smile Herb Festival
Join Smile Herb Shop celebrating 45 years of herbs, gardens and herbalism education this May. Enjoy plants in our garden center, live music, food, garden tours, plant walks, lectures, natural product vendors and more. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Free to attend. Smile Herb Shop: 4908 Berwyn Rd. College Park, MD; www.smileherbschool.com

Chesapeake Sea Glass Festival
With over 30 sea glass artisans from all over the area, this event is a fun-filled day of lectures and shard identifications. It will be a great way to see what people collect from each area and to have your shards identified and listen to lectures. Chesapeake College: 1000 College Cir. Wye Mills, MD; www.visitmaryland.org

SUNDAY, MAY 19

Maryland Psychic Fair
Many of the best psychics, mediums, healers and readers of all types, along with related arts and crafts vendors from Maryland and the surrounding areas, will come together for the Maryland Psychic Festival. For both those who are serious or for those who are just curious, this event can be anything from a life-changing experience to just a fun time. Three out of four tables offer some type of readings, one of the four tables offer related arts, crafts, books, oils, crystals, information and more. Snacks and soft drinks will be available to purchase. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets $5-$10 at the door, cash only. Bowie Elks Lodge No 2309: 1506 Defense Hwy. Gambrills, MD; www.fb.com/EventPsychics4u

THURSDAY, MAY 23 – SUNDAY, MAY 26

Maryland Deathfest 2019
A celebration of the best of death metal in the region. Performances take place across all major Maryland venues like Rams Head Live! and Baltimore Soundstage. Don’t miss the pre-festival party on Wednesday at Ottobar, featuring artists like Church of Misery, Yellow Eyes, Cro-Mags and more. Tickets $23-$249. Various times and locations; www.deathfests.com

FRIDAY, MAY 24 – SUNDAY, MAY 26

Museum of Science Fiction Gallery Opening at Escape Velocity 2019
The Museum of Science Fiction and NASA are partnering to bring Escape Velocity 2019 to Washington, DC. The event is a futuristic world’s fair to promote informal STEAM educational activities within the context of science fiction using the fun of comic cons and fascination of science and engineering festivals. Escape Velocity 2019 seeks to make a measurable positive impact to boost informal learning on the more conceptually challenging academic areas. Escape Velocity’s mission is to attract young people to science, technology, engineering, art, and math by producing and presenting the most compelling, exciting, educational, and entertaining science festival in the United States using science fiction as its primary engine. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Free to attend. Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center: 201 Waterfront St. National Harbor, MD; www.escapevelocity.events

SATURDAY, MAY 25 – MONDAY, MAY 27

The FantasyWood Festival
The FantasyWood Festival hosted by ManneqArt and Circus Siren Pod is a magical three-day experience over Memorial Day Weekend. Join for a walk in the woods with surprises around each corner. Meet mermaids, fairies, watch live knights duel and even see a live unicorn. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m each day. Tickets $5-$20. The Chrysalis Theatre, Merriweather Park at Symphony Woods: 10431 Little Patuxent Pkwy. Columbia, MD; www.visithowardcounty.com

Photo: Taste of Reston

Your Guide To DC’s Neighborhood Festivals

The diverse neighborhoods of DC, Maryland and Virginia are ready to showcase all they have to offer now through the fall. Food, drink, art, dance and music abound in every corner of the DC area, giving you an excuse to check out a new pocket of your extended neighborhood every weekend. Read on to get the inside scoop on some of our staff picks for the 2019 festival season.

SATURDAY, MAY 11

Funk Parade
Funk Parade celebrates DC’s vibrant music and arts, the history of Black Broadway, and the spirit of funk that brings DC together. From the first year in 2014 to now, hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians from all corners of the District have come together for Funk Parade. This year’s event features countless acts such as the Chuck Brown Band, Michelle Blackwell, Reesa Renee and more. Festivities begin at 1 p.m. Free to attend.Along U Street in NW, DC; www.funkparade.com

SATURDAY, MAY 11 – SUNDAY, MAY 12

Bethesda Fine Arts Festival
This year’s Bethesda Fine Arts festival features 130 artists in various genres including live rock, jazz and reggae music. Walk through the festival and peruse unique jewelry, clothing and furniture on display. Then stop by local restaurants to enjoy pizza, barbecue, sandwiches and ice cream. Saturday from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Free to attend. Bethesda’s Woodmont Triangle: Along Norfolk, Auburn and Del Ray Avenues in Bethesda, MD; www.bethesda.org

SATURDAY, MAY 18 – SUNDAY, MAY 19

Quarterfest
Enjoy a food, beer and wine festival showcasing the diversity of Arlington’s food scene as Taste of Arlington becomes Quarterfest. This festival transforms Wilson Boulevard into a vibrant dining, shopping and family-fun festival for all ages. Experience a restaurant crawl showcasing eateries of the neighborhood and an extended two-day outdoor concert and pop-up street pub. 12-6 p.m. Free to attend, but tickets ($46.35-$123.60) are required for food and drinks. Wilson Boulevard between N. Taylor and N. Quincy Streets; www.quarterfestballston.org

SUNDAY, MAY 19

Old Town Festival of Speed and Style
The lower three blocks of King Street will be blocked off and vintage cars from the 50s, 60s, 70s and select luxury race cars will be there. Join special fashion events and pop-ups around Old Town that make the event great for everyone. All proceeds will benefit charity partner ACT for Alexandria, a community foundation focused on increasing charitable investment and community engagement. Festivities begin at 10 a.m. Free to attend. 200 King St. Alexandria, VA; www.festivalspeedstylealex.com

SATURDAY, MAY 25 – MONDAY, MAY 27

Rockville Hometown Holidays
Enjoy several dozen live performances on four different stages featuring rock, reggae, country and Americana artists. There will be marching bands, floats and more. The Memorial Day Parade starts at 10:30 a.m. Various times. Free to attend. Rockville Town Square: 30 Maryland Ave. Rockville, MD; www.rockvillemd.gov

THURSDAY, MAY 30 – SunDAY, JUNE 2

Herndon Festival
The Herndon Festival takes place in historic downtown Herndon and attracts an average of 80,000 people each year. This outdoor festival provides a fun-filled experience by combining the joy of an outdoor concert with the thrill of a summertime carnival. There’s something for everyone. Thursday 6-10 p.m. Friday 5-11 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 11 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free. www.herndonfestival.net

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 – SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Celebrate Fairfax!
This annual festival features concerts on eight different stages with headliners like Better Than Ezra, Smash Mouth and more. The festival features an abundance of other attractions like a petting zoo, carnival rides and a karaoke championship along with nightly fireworks and plenty of great food. Friday 6 p.m. – midnight, Saturday 10 a.m. – midnight and Sunday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Various ticket packages and admission prices available. Fairfax County Government Center: 12000 Government Center Pkwy. Fairfax, VA; www.celebratefairfax.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 – SATURDAY, JUNE 15

Taste of Reston
Taste of Reston, produced by the Greater Reston Chamber of Commerce, is the largest outdoor food festival in the area and was voted Northern Virginia’s Best Food Festival multiple times in recent years by Virginia Living. Reston Town Center will host the event’s restaurants and community vendors, plus live entertainment on three stages. Friday from 4-11 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Reston Town Center: 11900 Market St. Reston, VA; www.restontaste.com

SUNDAY, JULY 14

Silver Spring Arts & Crafts Summer Fair
Check out the Silver Spring Arts & Crafts Fair this summer featuring arts & crafts, food and beverage vendors, and many fun family activities. 2-8 p.m. Free to attend. Silver Spring Veterans Plaza: 1 Veterans Pl. Silver Spring, MD; www.silverspringdowntown.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24

17th Street Festival
Since 2010, the 17th Street Festival has been celebrating 17th Street and its diversity of restaurants and retailers. There are 100 vendors with more than 60 artists and makers displaying everything from fine art to jewelry, ceramics to crafts, and every creative item in-between. Other vendors include area nonprofit organizations, politicians, entrepreneurs and local businesses. The kids’ zone has activities for children including a large slide, soccer, snow cones, face painting and games throughout the day. All-day event. Free to attend. 17th Street from P Street to R Street in NW, DC; www.17thstreetfestival.org

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Adams Morgan Day
As DC’s longest-running neighborhood festival, Adams Morgan Day celebrated its 40th anniversary last year. The event is a family-friendly celebration with music, art and activities for all ages. Adams Morgan welcomes residents and visitors alike to meet neighborhood businesses, artists and service organizations. Attendance and entertainment are free, and local businesses and restaurants offered deals for the day. 18th Street to Kalorama and Columbia Roads in NW, DC; www.admoday.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

Clarendon Day
At this year’s Clarendon Day, there will be tons of arts and crafts vendors featuring everything from apparel to jewelry to art and photography and more. There will also be a number of food purveyors including many of Clarendon’s favorites. With local in mind, there also be several local nonprofits in attendance to make it easy for the community to connect with its service providers. Times TBA. Free to attend. www.clarendon.org

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6

Takoma Park Street Festival
The 38th annual Takoma Park Street Festival will once again host a talented mix of local artists offering paintings, photographs, pottery, silk-screening, bath and body care, stained glass, jewelry, woodworking, textiles, ceramics, kids’ items, and much more. Nonprofits, local companies and a variety of food vendors will also participate. In addition, Takoma’s indie businesses will be open and welcoming visitors. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Along Carroll Avenue in Takoma Park, MD and Carroll Street in NW, DC; www.mainstreettakoma.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13

H Street Festival
H Street Festival is one of the most anticipated and highly attended single-day festivals in DC. The festival is 11 blocks long and has 14 staging areas that are diversely themed and programmed to target the different segments of audiences. The staging areas feature music of different genres, dance, youth-based performances, interactive children’s program, fashion, heritage arts, poetry and much more.Along H Street in NE, DC; www.hstreetfestival.org

Photo: Jean Schindler

Stop Sucking: DC Says “No” to Single-Use Plastic Straws

When I arrived at college, the hot rumor was that drinking alcohol through a straw was the fast-track to getting trashed. My crew worked through boxes of straws to learn firsthand it was just an urban myth.

College drinking memories hit me recently when the District announced it would be the second major U.S. city to ban straws, effective January 2019. Establishments caught handing out contraband will get warnings until this summer, when fines come into effect.

Even though I almost never use straws anymore, I was weirdly indignant: the nanny state is telling us how to consume our beverages! But headlines were misleading. DC can use all the straws it wants – just as long as they’re not single-use plastic straws. And as it turns out, the shift to sustainable materials was already well underway.

“We try to be environmentally conscious in everything we do at Tiki TNT,” says Todd Thrasher, owner of the popular new rum bar at The Wharf. “I never even considered supplying plastic straws, ban or no ban. We already have a variety of alternative straw options from plant-based to paper.”

And in his expert opinion as a master of slow-drinking tiki cocktails: “I don’t find that the straw compromises the flavor profile of the drink.”

DC spots have been actively “greening” their bar programs for years, and plastic straws have been an easy target. Hank’s Cocktail Bar stopped providing them – unless specifically requested – years ago.  Shaw’s hip, subterranean cocktail bar 600t features reusable metal straws. Founding Farmers, which prides itself on being aggressively eco-friendly, long used compostable straws before switching to paper in 2017.

Buffalo & Bergen, the popular cocktail counter and soda fountain in Union Market, favors corn-based straws – though “many of our cocktails are designed to be served without a straw,” says owner and mixologist Gina Chersevani. “We make a dedicated effort to reduce and reuse.”

So it comes as no surprise that when Founding Farmers co-owner Dan Simons launched a campaign in early 2018 to formally do away with single-use plastic straws in DC’s hospitality industry, he found a groundswell of support. The Our Last Straw coalition incorporated as a nonprofit organization and rapidly picked up over 200 partners in bars, restaurants, hotels and nonprofits across the greater DC area.

The campaign picked up even more momentum last April when the Alice Ferguson Foundation snagged nearly 10,000 plastic straws during cleanup events along the Potomac River Watershed. Mayor Bowser’s office officially announced its support that same month, and in October, the city updated existing food service regulations to ban plastic straws (single-use foam products were banned in 2016). Maybe, some suggest, it’s time to start banning all single-use plastics.

Every year, nearly nine tons of plastic pollution float into the oceans, and experts estimate that by 2050, plastic trash will outweigh fish. This is bad news not just for fish, but also for humans: these plastics break into ever-smaller pieces until they slide into the food chain. Microplastics have been found in fish flesh, sea salt and even beer – and now in your stomach.

Though the world’s few million plastic straws are a minuscule part of the billions of plastics floating in the world’s oceans, some see the ban as another small step in a process of gradual change. Simons has suggested that a Last Plastic Fork initiative could be a reality in the near future. But he also notes that solutions to plastic pollution take time and cannot be only the product of top-down government action.

One enforcement question facing the District revolves around bubble tea, which requires sturdy, oversized straws. There are no environmentally friendly disposable alternatives available at present, and aggressive enforcement will harm at least a dozen small, often minority-owned businesses in the District.

“The challenge in finding a truly enviro-friendly straw that works for boba [bubble] tea is a perfect example of why I was inspired to start Our Last Straw,” Simons says. “We will eliminate all single-use plastic straws, and we can do it without any downside.”

Another exception is for people with disabilities who require plastic straws to drink or eat. Paper straws have limited usage time before they break apart and pose a choking hazard, while metal or glass straws can cause severe injury if someone bites down hard (as can happen during, for example, a seizure). Restaurants and bars in the District are still required to keep some plastic straws on hand for customers who require them.

“We need to work collaboratively with the supply chain, the regulators and the operators to find solutions,” Simons emphasizes. “If that means delaying or phasing in enforcement while the supply chain works to provide a true solution, so be it. We can’t pretend ideology is a substitute for reality.”

Learn more about Our Last Straw at www.ourlaststraw.org, including a list of local restaurant groups and other spots participating in the eco-friendly initiative.

600t: 600 T St. NW, DC
Buffalo & Bergen: 1309 5th St. NE, DC; www.buffalobergendc.com
Founding Farmers: Various locations in the DC area; www.wearefoundingfarmers.com
Hank’s Cocktail Bar: 1624 Q St. NW, DC; www.hankscocktailbar.com
Tiki TNT: 1130 Maine Ave. SW, DC; www.tikitnt.com

Illustration: Nick Caracciolo

The Cannabis Conversation

Cannabis legalization has been a hot topic for decades, but as federal legalization of the plant and its byproducts inches closer, policymakers, advocates and enthusiasts are in the weeds with conflicting state and federal laws. For the District, cannabis legality is particularly convoluted – especially when taking the different strains and uses of cannabis products into account.

Industrial hemp, for example, lacks the chemical compound of THC, which is responsible for producing the high that consumers get after ingesting the leaves of a regular marijuana plant. Industrial hemp has been descheduled as a schedule one controlled substance under federal law, but regular marijuana has not.

Then there’s byproducts of industrial hemp to consider like cannabidiol (CBD oil), which has surged in popularity because of its health benefits studied and tested by scientists internationally. It’s so trendy, in fact, CVS announced on March 21 it will begin selling CBD products in 800 stores across eight states.

While people who consume marijuana and its byproducts for medicinal purposes have more protection from the law in DC than those who consume it recreationally, the state of the plant’s legality is confusing, to say the least.

The Law

The distinction between DC and federal law is murky, especially because the District’s budget is controlled by Congress. But by looking at the timeline of legislation, one can start to parse out what is allowed – and what isn’t – in DC regarding marijuana and hemp consumption, possession and sales.

The Agricultural Act of 2014, or Farm Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama on February 7 that year. While the bill reauthorized and established various federal agricultural programs, the most important aspect of the bill for cannabis advocates was the allowance of institutions of higher education or state departments of agriculture to grow or cultivate industrial hemp for research purposes. Regular cannabis, however, remained a schedule one controlled substance alongside heroin and cocaine under federal law – where it still remains today.

Four years later, the Agricultural Act of 2018 passed, opening up the industrial hemp market by allowing states to regulate their own hemp production and research. But just because states are allowed to grow hemp doesn’t mean its byproducts are legal. Martin Lee, director of Project CBD, a nonprofit dedicated to CBD oil advocacy, takes issue with this aspect of the law.

“One of biggest problems – now according to the Farm Bill – is it’s legal to grow hemp and contents within hemp plant,” says Lee, who authored Smoke Signals: A Social History of Marijuana. “But once it’s extracted out of the plant, it’s not clear what the legality is. [This bill] is like a patch for bad software, [and] it’s impossible to patch up the bad software of the Controlled Substances Act.”

The Controlled Substances Act is the federal law under which cannabis is classified as a schedule one substance. This makes recreational possession, consumption and the selling of cannabis illegal at the federal level, but DC’s robust medicinal program is licensed and protected to prevent the Department of Justice from targeting medical cannabis providers who are in compliance with state law.

In the District, Initiative 71, a voter-approved ballot initiative that went into effect in February 2015, legalizes recreational consumption and possession of less than two ounces of marijuana – as long as the adult is at least 21 years of age. Growing up to six plants and consuming marijuana is also legal in the privacy of one’s own home, but public consumption is still illegal.

Gifting marijuana under Initiative 71 is allowed as long as the amount is one ounce or less and there’s no goods, services or money exchanged for the product. This makes the commercial sale of marijuana products illegal but medicinal sales are still allowed, which explains the small number of medical dispensaries in DC.

Although Initiative 71 basically legalizes public possession of marijuana, albeit a few caveats, a federal officer still has the right to arrest anyone holding any amount of marijuana in the District under federal law. So, to answer the question: Is weed legal in DC? Sort of, but advocates remain optimistic for the not-so-far-off future of marijuana descheduling and legalization.

Advocacy

Groups all over the country are pushing for a change in legislation at the federal level, but the one place to celebrate cannabis nationally is right here in DC at the National Cannabis Festival.

Festival founder and executive producer Caroline Phillips says she and a group of cannabis advocates started the festival in 2016 for two reasons: to give supporters of legalized cannabis a place to congregate and confer with one another while celebrating the cause, and as a fresh way to have the conversation by creating an all-inclusive event no matter a person’s identity.

“We wanted to create an event that’s accessible and approachable for a broad range of people from all backgrounds, cultures and ethnicities,” Phillips says. “You’ll see people from 21 to 80 years old from all backgrounds [and] speaking different languages, but all coming together over the shared love of a plant.”

The 2019 National Cannabis Festival will take place on April 20 at the RFK Stadium Festival Grounds. Phillips says in its first year, the festival saw about 5,000 attendees; this year, she’s expecting around 20,000.

“The response has been incredible,” she says. “We’re very lucky to have been so warmly received by our [community] of enthusiasts, patients, business owners and advocates. It’s exciting to see the way activists are taking the lead and working with for-profit organizations to make sure the cannabis industry is always connected to its grassroots – pun intended.”

While live music, an epic food court and a large selection of vendors will be the focal points of the event, the festival is also hosting a policy summit the day before on April 19. The policy summit aims to bring together “a diverse group of activists and leaders from government, business, healthcare, veterans groups, and civil rights organizations to discuss today’s most pressing cannabis policy challenges and opportunities,” according to the festival’s website.

The summit is free to the public and will be the landing point for a multitude of important discussions on cannabis policy, including the media’s coverage of cannabis, the path to federal legalization, and the need for FDA regulations on hemp and marijuana consumable products.

Morgan Fox, media relations director at the National Cannabis Industry Association, says the importance of FDA regulations is an especially big issue when looking at the medicinal side of the cannabis industry because patients deserve to know what exactly is in their medication.

“All cannabis advocates right now are looking forward to the day when they can work hand in hand with regulations like the FDA to ensure the medications that we put into hands of patients are safe,” he says. “Just in the same way you want to know what’s in the food you’re eating, it’s critical for people to know what’s in the plant.”

FDA regulations on cannabis will not only protect consumers but also allow for wider research and testing to be performed on the plant, which could lead to new and exciting discoveries about its medicinal properties, according to Phillips.

“Regulations would allow for us to develop and allow standards to be set by doctors and scientists, creating an environment for a product that is already in the hands of adults and going to continue being used on a broader scale not only in the U.S. but also around the world,” she says. “It’s in everybody’s best interest to support regulation and legalization in a burgeoning cannabis industry.”

Erica Stark, executive director at the National Hemp Association, confers with Phillips but includes the benefit of the doubt for marijuana, hemp and CBD oil producers that are doing the best they can to provide quality products to their customers.

“[The lack of regulations] is a very large problem in that consumers don’t know how to tell if they’re buying a quality product or not,” she says. “There’s plenty of good quality companies out there that are doing things the right way – the problem is bad actors out there.”

This month, the FDA plans to begin public hearings on allowing companies to produce CBD-infused food products, as commissioner Scott Gottlieb told the House Appropriations Committee in late February.

But before the FDA can begin setting regulations for the cannabis industry writ large, Phillips says the first step is descheduling the plant from the federal controlled substances list and then legalization, although she would like to see both happen simultaneously.

“Activists on the federal level are trying to push the government to full legalization and would like to see the government immediately deschedule cannabis so we can have broader testing,” she says. “A lot of folks are looking at the next presidential campaign cycle with candidates in support of legalization.”

The Future

While it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly what the future of cannabis looks like in the District and the country at large, one thing all the experts sourced here agree on is growth. On the CBD oil side of things, Lee of Project CBD says he believes the trend of hemp-based oils will continue and expand exponentially once regulations are in place.

“CBD has disordered the cosmos of the federal government,” he says. “It’s the hottest thing going these days. What we need are policies that facilitate wide access to CBD products but also regulate them on the basis of public health concerns.”

Stark at the National Hemp Association thinks the CBD oil market in particular will depend on the FDA and how they choose to regulate it.

“Assuming the FDA goes down a reasonable path [with regulations], the CBD industry will expand exponentially,” she says. “It’s already quite large and will only get larger as demand increases.”

Meanwhile, Fox from the National Cannabis Industry Association says he thinks the cannabis industry will likely follow the model of the beer industry, with big producers handling the average consumer market and smaller, localized producers serving the organics and artisan market.

“I really think consumer demand is going to shape the industry as opposed to corporate interest,” he says. “Because of the time at which this industry is evolving, I think corporate responsibility and ethics in sourcing is going to be more important [with cannabis] than most consumer products because of the culture of the consumers’ concerns.”

Phillips of the National Cannabis Festival thinks the industry will follow along a line similar to what Fox proposes; but she’s focused on the District specifically and reiterates her point on the importance of regulation.

“Because you’re allowed to do home growing in DC, it allows a lot of cannabis connoisseurs – not unlike craft brewers – to experiment with different strains at home and see what they can grow,” she says. “The danger of the unregulated market that we have in many states is patients can’t always be certain how a plant has been grown.”

Tap these educational resources to learn more about cannabis legalization.

National Cannabis Industry Association:
www.thecannabisindustry.org
National Hemp Association: www.nationalhempassociation.org
Project CBD: www.projectcbd.org

To learn more about cannabis in a festival setting, check out the National Cannabis Festival on Saturday, April 20. Doors open at 12 p.m. Tickets are $45.

RFK Stadium Festival Grounds: 2400 E. Capitol St. SE, DC; www.nationalcannabisfestival.com


CBD in the District

District Hemp Botanicals
Established in May 2017, District Hemp Botanicals was the first hemp-based CBD store to open its doors in the DMV. The shop boasts a wide selection of CBD and hemp products, from CBD salves and massage oils to bath bombs and gummy edibles. 9023 Church St. Manassas, VA and 19 Wirt St. SW, Leesburg, VA; www.districthempstore.com

National Holistic Healing Center
This medical dispensary located in Dupont Circle now serves all registered DC, Maryland and Pennsylvania medical marijuana patients as well as registered patients from select states. Led by CEO Dr. Chanda Macias, who has dedicated more than 15 years to understanding how medical marijuana can impact patients, the center has 98 percent patient retention and adds more than 100 new patients per month. To purchase marijuana products from the center, one must be a registered medical marijuana patient. 1718 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.nationalholistic.com

Relâche Spa at Gaylord National Resort
Starting this month, Relâche is featuring 50-minute CBD oil massages for a limited time. Spa director Debra Myers says if customers respond well to the specialty massage, she will consider adding the offer permanently to Relâche’s menu. “CBD is touted to decrease anxiety, lower inflammation, reduce pain and help improve sleep, which can all be achieved topically through the CBD hemp oil used during the massage service,” she says. Each massage costs $185 and the CBD oil used is Mary’s Nutritionals hemp oil and muscle relief compound. 201 Waterfront St. National Harbor, MD; www.nationalharbor.com/gaylord-national

Vim & Victor at The St. James
There’s a little something for everybody at Vim & Victor. Chef Spike Mendelsohn created the menu with health and wellness enthusiasts in mind, as well as everyday community members. Pro tip: try Mendelsohn’s own line of CBD-infused PLNT waters. 6805 Industrial Rd. Springfield, VA; www.vimandvictor.com

Public school playground at Sedona, Arizona // Photo: Bill Bamberger

HOOPS Depicts International Connection

Basketball has always held the hearts of people from all over the world. Need proof? Just turn on your TV until you find an NBA game. Hell, you can look at just this past year’s all-star roster featuring players from Germany, Greece, Australia, Cameroon, Serbia and Switzerland all sharing the same court.

Since the 1992 Summer Olympics and the formation of the Dream Team, basketball reached a fever pitch internationally. And though it’s unlikely that most kids who pick up the ball and head to a court will make it to the professional level, the game is nonetheless celebrated and played everywhere.

“It shows how we’re all connected around this common game,” photographer Bill Bamberger says. “It’s played worldwide. You can come upon [courts] in Italy and South Africa, and you can step up and play. It’s open to anyone willing to step on the court.”

Bamberger grew up hooping when he was a child, and in 2004, the established photographer began shooting courts near his home in North Carolina. Over the next 15 years, he traveled the country – and the world – collecting a diverse set of images depicting places people shoot, dribble and ultimately connect through this game. From now until next January, 75 large-format photographs from his massive collection are on display in his exhibition HOOPS at the National Building Museum.

“It was completely unintended,” he says. “I often start my projects close to home, and you expect to find courts everywhere. I love to explore the middle of nowhere, and I’d see these courts in cotton fields and in barns. I like some of the early ones that speak toward different times; not all of them are active and some are relics.”

Though the photographs are creatively captured through a series of environmental portraits, a majority of the 22,000 pictures feature basketball courts that aren’t what you’d expect to see at your local park. Some feature murals on bordering walls and a vibrant blacktop with a plexiglass backboard, while others are made up of a dirt surface with beat-up pieces of metal acting as rims.

“You take that basic design and it becomes interpreted in different ways,” Bamberger says. “The permutations are virtually endless, and each court reflects the design and influence of the host community.”

The courts are tremendously varied and display a certain amount of ingenuity on the part of the people who put them in place, while the backdrops for the photographs shed light on the communities they serve. From Italy and South Africa to New Hampshire and Philadelphia, each portrait displays a unique sense of place.

“I drove through Colorado and Utah and South Dakota just looking for hoops, and they were everywhere,” he says. “One of my favorites is a campsite in Utah. There was a hoop in the middle of these grassy fields and I photographed them in the distance, making the point that even in really remote places like this, you’ll find a court for young people.”

Bamberger didn’t just focus on public places; he often found extremely intimate settings worth immortalizing. There are a number of selections featuring courts in abandoned areas and others in family backyards.

“[For] some of the private places, I would stop and knock on the door. In every instance, I would ask. The same is true internationally. I remember I was on a court in Naples, Italy and there was a lot of ballers playing on the court. There was one who spoke some English, and I just asked them to clear the court.”

If nothing else, Bamberger set out to show how connected we are as a society through this one universal game. Whether your court is regulation-size in the middle of a city or involves a tree, a hubcap and a block of crooked wood, you can still pick up the ball and hoop.

“It’s been one of the truly fun projects to work on,” the photographer says, reflecting on the past decade. “I work on long-term projects, and as an artist, it’s been a joy to have something I can take worldwide. It represents the full range of the work. It’s probably time to let go, but it’s going to be hard. This exhibition represents a stopping point and opportunity to reflect on the project.”

HOOPS will be at the National Building Museum through January 5. Admission to the museum is $10. For more of Bamberger’s work, visit www.billbamberger.com.

National Building Museum: 401 F St. NW, DC; 202-272-2448; www.nbm.org

Light It UP! Scores Funding For Alexandria Basketball Courts

It’s truly amazing what a group of citizens can do when they partner up on something they care about – even if it’s something as simple as installing lights at outdoor basketball courts.

Started by Alexandria, Virginia natives Chris Denby, Bruce Falk and Mike Porterfield, community group Light It UP! (LIU) has gained enough support to partner with the City of Alexandria to provide lights at the basketball courts at Potomac Yard Park. Through fundraising efforts in the area, the group’s connections with Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson and councilman John Taylor Chapman, and sheer patience and determination, this $150,000 project has become a reality.

In 2016, the trio noticed there was inequity at the brand-new facilities at Potomac Yard, whether they were just passing by or in Porterfield’s case, picking up his son from the park just after dusk. There were lights on the tennis courts but not on the basketball courts. His son was shooting baskets in pitch black, but light was coming from the tennis courts, which didn’t seem right to him.

“As I’m waiting for him, I’m texting [Mayor] Wilson because we all know he’s dialed in,” Porterfield says. “He responded saying, ‘You’re a little late to the party; there’s already two guys [Falk and Denby] who are on it.’”

Mayor Wilson, along with the Alexandria City Council, supported the creation of a public-private partnership to help fund the new project, giving the guys the freedom to really make it happen.

“From there, Mike was a huge help, spurring us along with connections, energy and fundraising expertise that Bruce and I didn’t have prior to this,” Denby says. “We also took advantage of a lot of the opportunities [nonprofit] ACT for Alexandria provided to get well-known in the community. Their fundraising efforts were great and gave us some more clout.”

ACT for Alexandria’s annual Spring2ACTion event aims to strengthen the local community as a “giving day” to support all the nonprofits doing incredible work locally, which benefited LIU’s progress as well.

“We got some camera time, and experienced good camaraderie with people organizing Alexandria-specific events,” Falk says. “John and Justin came out to dunk on our mini-hoop; those things also lead to productive, positive photo ops that we can leverage on Facebook and elsewhere – things that are individually small but amplify one another.”

LIU is all about extending the use of the basketball courts and their overall time availability, but there’s also increased opportunities for local rec leagues and others that might be able to take advantage of the courts in a structured way “that’s beneficial to specific organizations and the city in terms of revenue and maintenance,” Falk says. “We think of it as a positive feedback loop.”

Of course, only time will tell the long-term impact LIU will make, but it’s clear the project is creating opportunities for the overall community.

“The legacy of what this could be [includes] more kids who are staying occupied, doing healthy activities and not hanging out playing video games when the weather is good,” Denby says. “You’ll get adults that are staying fit, staying happy and they’re outside being good citizens for good health. There’s no measure for that, but you know that it’s going to be the result.”

Falk touches on an invisible benefit for people that have been going by Potomac Yard, seeing lights from the tennis courts and darkness on the basketball courts.

“For people inclined to make use of the basketball courts, there was an implicit message that they are somehow less important, or their needs are somehow less important,” he says. “Now that the lights are going up, we are showing the city values everybody equally.”

Not only that, the usage of the courts will increase significantly, raising an excellent point about the numbers of the sport.

“In basketball, you’re going to get at least 10 people playing and sometimes more,” Falk says.

Denby adds, “There’s always someone saying, ‘I got next game.’ The force multiplier is huge. You’re rotating through [players] on a good day.”

The lights have been ordered by the City of Alexandria and the LIU team is waiting eagerly for the installation date. Signage is being finalized and funds are completely transferred. Now all that’s left to do is host the unveiling later this spring.

“The unveiling should be awesome,” Falk says. “[We’ll] have two rec kids’ teams, and we’ll have them play under the lights. We’re excited be able to recognize all our donors and major supporters.”

Light It UP! is successfully bringing lights to the community basketball courts at Potomac Yard Park thanks to PARKnerships with the Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities (RPCA).


To learn more and receive updates about the LIU project, visit www.fb.com/pg/lightituppotomacyards.

Photo: Moultrie Tisdale

Fray’s Britt Rheault Promotes Inclusivity

Britt Rheault is taking the social sports world by storm one city at a time. The born and bred Boston sports fan turned DMV lady boss has spent nearly five years lending her passion, experience and knowledge to United Fray, where she currently oversees leagues in Phoenix, Jacksonville, New Orleans and the District from the company’s home office in Northeast DC’s Brentwood neighborhood.

When Fray’s director of sports operations first participated in the Sport & Social Industry Association’s annual conference for all social sports companies in the U.S. and Canada, only 10 percent of attendees were women. Last month, she went to the conference for the fifth time and the number of industry females in attendance had risen to 40 percent.

“The sports industry has always been a male-dominated world, but it keeps growing and women’s involvement keeps increasing by the day,” she says.

Rheault credits Fray’s founder and CEO Robert Kinsler with embracing female empowerment, noting that the company has more women in leadership roles than men.

“I feel like we have a pretty solid split on the women-to-men ratio. It keeps increasing. In the sports industry, you don’t always have that, so I’m very appreciative.”

Fray has offered participation in women’s leagues throughout the years, and the numbers have always fluctuated. To try and meet in the middle, Fray offers open divisions so there’s no gender requirements.

“It can be a team of all women or all men, or half women [and] half men. It’s to bridge that gap so we can get that opportunity of all women who want to play together.”

Rheault went to Worcester State University where she played softball and basketball. To stay active, she now plays in several Fray leagues including kickball and Skee-Ball, and occasionally cornhole and softball.

“[The leagues] are definitely just for fun, for the social and the drinking [aspects]. I could care less if we win.”

She’s helped come up with more creative ways of getting female players involved, including river tubing, speed dating and yoga.

“We’re trying to offer as many options as possible to get as many different females and males involved with what we have going on,” she explains. “The goal is to keep increasing those opportunities so we can be as inclusive as possible. Bringing as many people in to join the Fray family is what we want.”

After receiving her master’s in sports management at Northeastern University, Rheault joined DC Fray as a sports coordinator for permitting. Now, she has a total of nine direct reports at the rapidly expanding company.

“I’ve been on such a journey with this company. When I started, it was me and two other guys who were doing everything. We’ve gone from that to now [having] 20 full-time employees with Fray and [expansion to] three other cities.”

She’s seen immense growth among the sports leagues too, with the number of players rising from 25,000 to more than 60,000 among Fray’s four markets. But the expansion hasn’t stopped there.

“Embracing those other avenues in events and media – and growing us to be more than just a sports company [and] offering something to everyone – that’s probably been one of the most incredible things to see.”

Spring registration for team sports is open through March 26 and for bar sports through April 2. Find your league at www.dcfray.com/leagues.

Photos: Courtesy of 10 creatives // Illustration: Trent Johnson

The Artistic, The Inspiring and The Fashionable: 10 Creative Female Forces in the District

With a record number of women running for president in 2020 and the largest number of women in a congressional freshman class yet, 2019 is shaping up to be the Year of the Woman in politics. Much less hyped in DC’s media, however, are the strides made by women in the arts. That’s why for our Women’s Issue, On Tap chose to highlight 10 outstanding women from the areas of performing arts, fine arts, wellness and empowerment, and style. From Strathmore’s CEO to one of Rihanna’s stylists, meet the badass ladies responsible for expanding a culture of inclusivity and women empowerment in the city.

PERFORMING ARTS

Photo: Margot Schulman

Photo: Margot Schulman

Monica Jeffries Hazangeles
President and CEO, Strathmore

Monica Jeffries Hazangles began her artistic journey when she first joined choir in elementary school, but focused her vision after falling in love with arts management as a graduate student during her time with the Friends of Chamber Music in Kansas City, Missouri.

From there, she joined American University’s Arts Management program in DC then Strathmore, where she’s served as president since 2011. In September 2018, she added the title and responsibilities of CEO to her repertoire. While serving as the Strathmore’s president over the years, Hazangles formed her personal worldview on the importance of the arts, believing they are “elemental to who we are as people.”

“[The arts] give us expanded ways to express ourselves,” she says. “They elevate, enrich and transform us. It is our job to make them as accessible as possible to the residents of this region and state. If arts are within reach of everyone who wants to access them, we will ensure that generations grow up believing the arts are essential.”

Her advice for finding authority and voice as a woman in the arts is “to demonstrate that there are many ways to lead and to be creative.”

“Women can be extremely effective in demystifying leadership.”

Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org

Photo: DJ Corey Photography

Photo: DJ Corey Photography

Rebecca Ende Lichtenberg
Managing Director, Studio Theatre

Rebecca Ende Lichtenberg left Theatre J last October to join Studio Theatre as its new managing director. Although she is only 37, Lichtenberg has already made a splash in DC’s performing arts scene over the past eight years; moving to Studio Theatre gives her the chance to shine on a bigger stage, so to speak.

Studio Theatre’s Queen of Basel, showing from March 6 to April 7, focuses on empowering women by flipping the script on a play rooted in misogyny. The play is a modern, Latinx-focused retelling of Miss Julie, which tells the story of a woman who kills herself because a man told her that was the only way to escape the burden of their premarital rendezvous. Playwright Hilary Bettis’ version, complete with actual female character development, is sure to be devoid of the outdated, sexist themes of the original.

“Hilary’s take on [the play] is born from how sick the misogyny of his original made her feel, so she actively counters that with a production that is a Miss Julie without unexamined misogyny,” Lichtenberg says. “That’s why we’re proud to present Queen of Basel. It’s a take on Miss Julie that is empowering, told from a prismatic Latinx perspective, and most importantly, is unexpected.”

For dates and tickets to Queen of Basel, visit www.studiotheatre.org.

Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

Photo: Courtesy of Arena Stage

Photo: Courtesy of Arena Stage

Seema Sueko
Deputy Artistic Director, Arena Stage

Seema Sueko says in the grand scheme of things, she does theatre to build successful communities; but there is a deeper, underlying layer of her passion.

“Nothing beats the excitement and electricity of being in a rehearsal room with fellow artists and discovering the truths of a character’s arc or the truth of a piece of text,” she says. “We are discovering what it means to be human. It is powerful and it is humbling.”

Sueko’s current production, The Heiress, runs until March 10 and has some juicy bits of truth in store for the audience. Playwrights Ruth and Augustus Goetz based The Heiress on Henry James’ novella Washington Square, the inspiration for which he found through a piece of gossip. After Sueko finished assembling the design team for the play, she noticed she had unintentionally hired a cast of people who all identified as women, which she thought fit perfectly.

“Once I realized that, I could see how all-female design team allows us to build on the legacy of growing empowerment of this story from gossip to stage.”

The Heiress runs through March 10. For information regarding showtimes and tickets, visit www.arenastage.org.

Arena Stage: 1101 Sixth St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

FINE ARTS

Photo: Courtesy of Marcella Stanieri

Photo: Courtesy of Marcella Stanieri

Marcella Stranieri
Illustrator

Marcella Stranieri has always loved to draw. She’s kept a journal of her thoughts, ideas and drawings ever since she was little, and often finds loose scraps of paper covered in doodles and observations in her pockets and bags.

“These two idiosyncrasies, drawing and writing, collided with each other a few years ago when I quit smoking,” the DC-based illustrator says. “My hands were itching for cigarettes all the time. It was driving me nuts, so I started drawing out my ideas instead of writing them to keep my hands busy. I loved it so much, so I decided to start an Instagram for them.”

Now, her Instagram page @marcella.draws has more than 46,000 followers and is still growing. She finds inspiration for her sarcastic pen and paper line drawings in her daily experiences with friends, family and strangers alike. She’s found a lot of support from both men and women on Instagram and has noticed men commenting that they relate with her drawings, even the particularly “girly” ones.

“I like that people are slowly realizing that the default relatable thing does not have to be masculine. Men can relate to women the same way that women have been relating to men for the past few millennia.”

To see the latest artwork from Stranieri, follow her on Instagram @marcella.draws, and visit her website www.marcelladraws.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Lauren Brown

Photo: Courtesy of Lauren Brown

Lauren Melanie Brown
Founder, Fashion Grunge

Freelance photographer Lauren Melanie Brown created Fashion Grunge, an online platform dedicated to art, fashion and music of the 90s grunge era, in 2008 when she was living in New York City.

“The era of blogs was starting, and I was uninspired in my day job and wanted a place to talk about my favorite era of music and fashion,” Brown says. “Now Fashion Grunge has become an international platform for artists to contribute work and music related to the grunge aesthetic as they see fit. It’s great to get so many global perspectives while also tying in nostalgic culture.”

As a woman of color, Brown says she’s always trying to uplift marginalized voices and experiences on her platform.

“I always encourage people of all identities to contribute to the Fashion Grunge platform, whether it’s in traditional images or essays to express inner thoughts. I think visibility is the key for appreciating and educating about minorities. I consciously use my reach online to show not just a singular notion of what you can be and express.”

To read Fashion Grunge, visit www.fashiongrunge.com. For more information about Brown, visit www.laurenmelaniebrown.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Tati Pastukhova

Photo: Courtesy of Tati Pastukhova

Tati Pastukhova
Co-founder + Managing Director, ARTECHOUSE

Nearly a decade ago, Tati Pastukhova and Sandro Kereselidze created Art Soiree, a DC-based organization dedicated to uplifting and curating contemporary artists and their work. As technology advanced, the pair quickly realized the lack of space for artists who work with new wave digital mediums. That’s where ARTECHOUSE comes in. The “art space dedicated to showcasing experiential and technology driven works” also houses the first augmented reality bar in the U.S.

“Technology has expanded our abilities as humans to interact with what we are given and that includes our imagination and expression in arts,” Pastukhova says. “The new forms of art that will emerge through technology will allow viewers to be a part of the storytelling and of the creative processes, enabling them to curate their own experience of art, unique to themselves.”

In early spring, ARTECHOUSE will feature an installment titled “In Peak Bloom,” showcasing works of art based on DC’s famous cherry blossoms from an all-female cast of creators.

“We believe in treating everyone equal and part of that is not creating a differentiation or highlighting one individual or group over the other. It is important to highlight [the fewer number of women in arts and tech] in hopes of inspiring the current and future generation to enter these fields.”

To learn more about Art Soiree, visit www.artsoiree.com, and for more information about ARTECHOUSE, visit www.dc.artechouse.com.

ARTECHOUSE: 1238 Maryland Ave. SW, DC; www.dc.artechouse.com

WELLNESS + EMPOWERMENT

Photo: Wendy K. Yalom

Photo: Wendy K. Yalom

Kimberly Pendleton
Women’s Empowerment Coach

As a women’s empowerment coach and women’s studies professor at the University of Maryland, Kimberly Pendleton helps women realize their full potential through online and in-person courses, workshops and programs. She started her personal business of women’s empowerment coaching when she was finishing her PhD. Now, Pendleton helps over 200 clients from around the globe to strengthen their personal relationships, find out who they are and drop baggage.

“My premium program UNCOVER has helped women recover their relationships, find love and most importantly, feel at home in themselves,” Pendleton says.

UNCOVER, a 10-week program focusing on inner awakenings through embodied practices and coaching exercises, has a $1,237 price tag, but Pendleton says the high cost of service is supportive of the “high level of energy and training” that goes into her work.

“I do believe in paying women for their labor and valuing their knowledge, especially in areas that bring soft skills and social/emotional intelligence to the forefront. I also have seen that when women invest in themselves at an edge that makes them feel a little nervous, they show up for themselves in a different way and experience more rapid transformation.”

Pendleton also offers some complimentary services including #MeToo workshops, an e-newsletter and Roadmap to Romance, a free week of video trainings on self-love, empowerment, and relationships available at www.roadmaptoromance.com.

For more information about Pendleton and the services she provides including UNCOVER, visit www.kimberlypendleton.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Leah Beilhart

Photo: Vanessa Baioni

Leah Beilhart
Founder, Behold.Her

Leah Beilhart wanted to be a professional soccer player, but that all changed after one service trip to the Czech Republic from Germany.

“It was the first time I saw a photograph of myself and cried,” she says. “The amount of sweat, mud and joy across my face was priceless. It changed my life and made me decide that I wanted to give that same pleasure to another human being.”

Over the next several years, Beilhart built her portfolio, reputation and skills as a freelance photographer before landing in DC.

“Portraiture became my main game and eventually the catalyst for Behold.Her when I found myself in DC wanting to create an environment where women could feel carefree and less filtered.”

Behold.Her, now in its third year, began as a portraiture and conversational series, but soon blossomed into a project series captivating a community of women and celebrating its diverse racial, cultural, religious and sexual orientation backgrounds.

“The biggest things we focus on is self-worth. We want women to focus completely on listening and sharing. Self-development takes a lot of energy. Most women leave emotionally depleted, but at the same time re-energized to approach life a little differently or feel less alone.”

Beilhart says Behold.Her is working toward a Self Worth Conference at the end of the year. Each quarter of 2019 will have its own theme: self-worth, sexuality and consent, money and guilt, and finally, community and relationships. All four themes will be combined at the multi-day, self-focused conference for women.

For additional information about Beilhart, visit her website at www.leahbeilhart.com. For details about Behold.Her and its various programs and conferences, visit www.beholdher.co.

STYLE

Photo: Alison Beshai

Photo: Alison Beshai

Frederique Stephanie
Freelance Stylist + Consultant

From Belgium to the Middle East, France to Ireland and England to DC, Frederique Stephanie has trotted the globe as a freelance stylist and public relations consultant. Freddie, as her friends call her, has worked as a stylist for celebrities like Rihanna, Drew Barrymore, Alexa Chung, Lily Allen and Pixie Geldof. But the biggest highlight of Freddie’s career was working on the Adidas Originals campaign featuring David Beckham, Snoop Dogg and Noel Gallagher, among other big names. Style is important to Stephanie, and always has been. And while she is definitely stylish, she says she’s not a fashionista.

“Style is a better word,” she says. “It is a reflection of my unique complexity as a human being.”

Stephanie decided to move across the Atlantic when she saw the growth potential for the DC creative market. She says her success in the nation’s capital comes from her unique background and perspective.

“I’m a black girl with Caribbean roots raised in Paris, but who spent most of her life in London. The DC creative scene needs more variety and different point of views. The city is changing and so will the industry standards as people start pushing boundaries.”

Now working as a PR consultant for Eaton DC, a collective of culture, media, hospitality, wellness and progressive social change, Stephanie says it’s “one of the most significant projects [she’s] ever worked on.”

“[Eaton DC] is the perfect platform because of what it stands for and the impact it already has on the city. They are doing incredible work, which is essential in the current [social and political] climate.”

To see what’s stylish to Frederique Stephanie, follow her on Twitter @frederique_s, and check out her blog, www.thepopuphouse.com.

Photo: Matt Spivack

Photo: Matt Spivack

Jai Lescieur
Stylist + Creative Director

Jai Lescieur recently moved to DC from London where she began her career as a styling manager and creative consultant. She worked on a variety of projects that included assisting on a shoot for Vogue China, working on a documentary about David Beckham, customizing outfits for a British TV show and getting published in British Vogue. Now, Lescieur works closely with Lauren Melanie Brown at Fashion Grunge and continues to freelance as a stylist.

“I feel like I have barely scratched the surface of what DC has to offer and I am excited to continue exploring the city,” she says.

Her love for fashion and art stems from a childhood spent in Mexico City, where her mother would dress up even when she wasn’t going out and her father would wear pants tailored from curtains just because he loved the fabric so much. Now that she’s grown, Lescieur finds inspiration from powerful women like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Michelle Obama who are exploring different kinds of fashion while in the public eye.

“I love how they are changing the conversation of how women are viewed by what they wear. Although some people will always unfairly criticize powerful women for what they wear, these women are showing that fashion can also be a symbol of their empowerment.”

For more information about Jai Lescieur, visit her website at www.jailescieur.com or follow her on Instagram @jai_stylefactory.

Photo: Courtesy of Chrystalle Ball

Leading Ladies of DC’s Beer Scene: Deep Roots Gain New Ground

The world of craft beer is dramatically different than it was even a few years ago. Quality beer is more readily available than ever and thanks to social media, it’s easy to keep up with new beers and breweries. Here in DC, women have a prominent place in the beer scene.

Chrystalle Ball is the founder of DC Metro Girls Pint Out, the local chapter of a national craft beer organization for women to enjoy happy hours, tastings and other events that build community around a love of beer. She joined the Arizona chapter originally, but after moving to the DMV, she found there were no chapters here. She got to work, and DMV Girls Pint Out had its first event in 2013.

“There is a stereotype that women don’t drink beer,” Ball says. “People come to our events for the first time and they’ll say, ‘Oh, I didn’t know there were so many women that drink beer in this area.’ There are, you just have to look.”

Ball says that over the past five-plus years of involvement in the DC beer community, a lot more women are beginning to actually work in beer. She notes Lake Anne Brew House in Reston, Virginia, which is women-owned and has many women brewers, and says that DC also has plenty of women industry veterans like Kristi Mathews Griner of Beltway Brewing Company in Sterling, Virginia.

“Women are popping up all over the area in brewing roles, and it needs to keep happening,” she says, noting that the Pink Boots Society, which helps women advance their careers in the beer industry, is an important resource. “Women are pigeonholed toward wine, but women love beer – and women were the first brewers of beer.”

Sara Bondioli, president of the DC Homebrewers Club, says that the long tradition of women brewers also helped inspire her to try it herself.

“I was reading a book that had a section on the history of brewing, and for most of history, women were the main brewers,” Bondioli says. “It’s only more recently that it’s been seen as a male profession. It hadn’t occurred to me that homebrewing was even an option until then, but I did a lot of baking from scratch and I thought I would try making beer from scratch.”

Fast forward to about seven years later, and she’s now running the club and helping other women get into homebrewing, too. Women club members started the Homebrewing Outreach and Participation Sisterhood (HOPS), which has women-focused brew days, happy hours and speaking events. Bondioli says that through homebrewing, women and men alike have freedom to create funky combinations while enhancing their appreciation of the brewing process.

“I’ve had some really creative beers through the homebrew. Someone made a pickleback beer, but they did it in a very restrained way that worked out really well. Especially with the club, you get to see what other people create and it gives you ides of things to try as well.”

Her signature beer? A strawberry rhubarb saison. This creative spirit is everywhere in the beer world, from the beers themselves to their labels. Chelsea Bailey, who runs the @21stamendmentgirl beer Instagram account and works in DC Brau’s tasting room, says she originally started the account to highlight the beauty of beer design.

“Honestly, I started drinking craft beer because I love the labels,” she says. “I challenged myself to drink a whole bottle of whatever I chose [to feature], I developed a palate and it grew into this whole other world.”

Bailey landed her job at DC Brau thanks in part to her social media presence, and it’s given her “a chance to meet other people who are like-minded and passionate.”

“There are people who have heard about my Instagram account, and I’m excited to go in and talk about beer with them.”

All three women say that there’s a number of things happening in the DC beer world to look forward to this spring. This month, ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar is exclusively pouring ciders, wines, beers and cocktails from female-owned and operated businesses. On the homebrewing front, the DC Homebrewers Club is now accepting entries for its annual homebrewing competition, the Cherry Blossom Challenge. And DMV Girls Pint Out will soon host its fifth annual Girl Scout Cookie and beer pairing event; check website for updates.

“If someone wants to get into beer and has experienced that whole beer snobbery thing, I would love for them to come to our events and just try things,” Ball says.

That’s the main theme that seems to unite area breweries and beer enthusiasts: condescension and pretentiousness are out, and inclusiveness and community are in.

“Overall, the DC beer scene is supportive of having women involved, active and part of the group,” Bondioli says. “Most of the places out here seem to understand that they don’t have to market beer to women differently. They can just make a good beer and women and men will drink it – and everyone out here can appreciate that.” Bailey echoes that sentiment.

“Beer isn’t a man’s drink. It’s everybody’s drink.”

Follow Bailey on Instagram @21stamendmentgirl and learn more about DMV Girls Pint Out at www.girlspintout.org or on Twitter @dmvgirlspintout. Check out the DC Homebrewers Club at www.dchomebrewers.com, the club’s Cherry Blossom Challenge at www.dchbcompetition.com and the Pink Boots Society at www.pinkbootssociety.org. More on the breweries and cideries below.

ANXO Cidery & Pinxtos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com
Beltway Brewing Company: 22620 Davis Dr. Ste 110, Sterling, VA; www.beltwaybrewco.com
DC Brau: 3178 Bladensburg Rd. Suite B, NE, DC;www.dcbrau.com
Lake Anne Brew House: 4310, 11424 Washington Plaza W.Reston, VA; www.lakeannbrewhouse.com