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Trevor Noah

2018-2019 Performing Arts Guide: 25 Must-See Performances

Scattered among the hustle and bustle of DC’s bureaucracy, there are creative hubs of everyone from singers and actors to directors and writers, practicing day by day to give you exceptional shows this performing arts season. From upscale date nights at the Kennedy Center to intimate performances at Signature Theatre, we’ve collected some of the most enticing and need-to-know shows for lovers of the stage.

This year, there are the usual themes of love and Shakespeare adaptations, but have you ever seen Shakespeare set in a 1980s Manhattan dive bar where the love is as fluid as the music? Gender-bending and upbeat, you can catch Illyria at Gunston Arts Center. Or stick a little closer to the classics at National Theatre with the heart-fluttering magic of Finding Neverland, based on the Academy Award-winning film. We’re also excited for DC comedy this season, including Bentzen Ball returning this month with a wonderfully diverse lineup of the funniest voices out right now.

If you’re missing your summer vacation, you can catch a wave with Arena Stage’s Anything Goes, set on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean and starring Disney Channel’s Corbin Bleu. True crime nerds and future lawyers won’t want to miss the behind-the-scenes investigative journey of Netflix’s Making a Murderer at Lincoln Theatre. This season’s stories are like a bouquet of Edible Arrangements: completely enticing and with a performance for everyone. Don’t wait to pick your treat!

October

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18

Illyria
This WSC (Washington Shakespeare Company) Avant Bard production set in the 1980s is a colorful and music-heavy tale where gender is an afterthought. Illyria is freely adapted from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, a story in which seemingly straight characters fall in love with someone despite their projected gender identity and not because of it. Ezra Tozian will be playing Viola in her cross-dressing performance as Cesario, taking the act to another level as a performance within a performance. What are the subtle mannerisms that she’ll take from gender to gender? What is it about Viola and Cesario that their admirers will fall in love with? The titular Illyria dive bar in Manhattan will intertwine the lives of multiple identities, all while bumping the music of love. Gunston Arts Center’s Theatre Two: 2700 S. Lang St. Arlington, VA; www.wscavantbard.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 – SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 & FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 – SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

Trevor Noah
You have no excuse to miss one of the fiercest names in comedy this fall. The South African comedian and The Daily Show host will make multiple appearances at DAR Constitution Hall in October, where he’ll continue to use his platform to discuss race and social justice in his home country and here in the U.S. We can’t think of a better way to round out your weekend than with Noah’s wit and wisdom. DAR Constitution Hall: 1776 D St. NW, DC; www.dar.org

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 – FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28

Bentzen Ball Comedy Festival
Comedian Tig Notaro has curated three nights of comedy just for DC. First up is Phoebe Robinson, from HBO’s 2 Dope Queens and Netflix’s Ibiza. Stick around for Amanda Seales’ presentation of “Smart, Funny, & Black.” You’ll know Seales from HBO’s runaway hit Insecure. And I can’t wait to hear what kind of funny disaster stories will be shared during “#Adulting” with Michelle Buteau and Jordan Carlos. Unfortunately, the exuberant jokester Jonathan Van Ness (of Queer Eye fame) is already sold out. You can still enjoy performances by the previously mentioned though, as well as Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher. I love the idea of a festival full of diverse talent who are passionate about bringing their comedic style center stage. The Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 – WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9

Billy Elliot
Ballet. Coal mining. Labor strikes. Following your dreams. An infectious soundtrack, courtesy of Sir Elton John himself. What do all of these things have in common? They’re all part of the iconic tale of the boy who loved to dance, coming to Arlington’s award-winning, intimate space at Signature Theatre. The singalong tale will run through the holidays, providing the perfect opportunity to show DC’s magnificent productions of classic theatre to your houseguests. Or sneak out and enjoy this feel-good, toe-tapping tale on your own. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

Anything Goes 2

November

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 – SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23

Anything Goes
As the SS American carries away its passengers from London to New York, it also sails a little secret across the ocean. There’s a passionate love stowed away between Billy and the countess Hope Harcourt. She’s meant to get married to the wealthy Lord Evelyn Oakleigh (please pronounce in your snootiest voice – it’s probably an accurate descriptor of the character). Of course, Billy doesn’t have the riches, but he does have determination and that has to count for something, right? He manages to get some fellow passengers on board (ha) with his mission, and the rest is for you to find out. I’ll be rooting for Billy mostly because he’s played by a familiar face, Disney Channel’s own Corbin Bleu. Arena Stage’s Fichandler Stage: 1101 Sixth St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Inside Netflix’s Making a Murderer
The documentary series centered on Steven Avery’s wrongful conviction of sexual assault and attempted murder at the age of 23 offers a deeper dive into the stories from the lawyers in the courtroom with him. Avery spent 18 years in prison before his exoneration, only to be convicted of another murder two years after his release. Anyone who gets a thrill from cold cases will love this discussion, with time for audience questions. Attorneys David Rudolf and Jerry Buting will share the ins and outs of their work on the cases, reminding us all that true crime stories aren’t just tales for our entertainment. These cases are the culmination of investigation, interviews, anxiety and a search for truth spanning decades. The in-depth event will be moderated by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $35. The Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Comedy Get Down
Four of the biggest names in comedy – Eddie Griffin, George Lopez, D.L. Hughley and Cedric The Entertainer – reunite to bring their individual comedic talents to one night of comedy at MGM Theatre. The incredibly accomplished lineup returns for two nights of laughs after their wildly successful, sort-of-scripted (but always real) series based on the 2017 version of the tour aired on BET. No matter your preferred brand of comedy, you’re guaranteed a good time at one of these performances. The Theater at MGM National Harbor: 101 MGM National Ave. Oxon Hill, MD; www.mgmnationalharbor.com

Elf the Musical

December

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

Elf The Musical
Everyone’s favorite modern Christmas classic hits the stage just in time for the holiday season. In case you’ve never seen Will Ferrell’s magnum opus (just one gal’s humble opinion), this absurd and endearing comedy sees an orphaned boy raised in the North Pole by elves venture to the Big Apple in search of his father during the most wonderful time of the year. A night of wholesome, wintry laughs is guaranteed. I’m so excited I could cram 11 cookies into my VCR. Olney Theatre Centre: 2001 Olney Sandy Spring Rd. Olney, MD; www.olneytheatre.org

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

The Panties, The Partner and The Profit
German playwright Carl Sternheim is an unsung hero in the art of satire. Playwright David Ives and Shakespeare Theatre Company (STC) are bringing meditations on the middle class to the U.S. with this adaptation of Sternheim’s trilogy of plays about the Mask family – this time set across America and spanning the 1950s to the 1980s. In addition to bringing this adaptation stateside, Ives will collaborate with STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn for the final time as he rounds out his 30-year role with the theatre company. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Lansburgh Theatre: 450 7th St. NW, DC; www.shakespearetheatre.org

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

The Play That Goes Wrong
This is a classic case of whodunnit that will make you…laugh? The play’s premise has a group putting on their own play, The Murder at Haversham Manor, and the cast is about as great as if your uncle wrangled his five kids and your grandmother together to perform at the holiday party. The murder mystery is less thrill and suspense, more bizarre and meant to make you cry of laughter rather than fear. The production describes itself as the illegitimate Broadway baby of Sherlock Holmes and Monty Python, and satirizes the idea of a terribly untalented production of actors through purposeful missed lines and breathing “corpses.” Fire extinguishers put out a person – not a fire – and doors hit actors and fall off the hinges entirely. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

Nell Gwynn

January

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 – SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Twelve Angry Men
The American justice system exists in tumult, and this classic play shows us that it has been in that state for a long time. For those of you who somehow made it out of a high school government class without watching the movie adaptation of Twelve Angry Men, the story follows 12 men who are identified only by their juror numbers as they contentiously deliberate the fate of a young Hispanic boy accused of killing his father. Race, justice, age and community are examined in this classic and evergreen story. Ford’s Theatre: 511 10th St. NW, DC; www.fordstheatre.org

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20

Step Afrika! 25th Anniversary Celebration
Traditional stepping has origins in South Africa and has since made its way into American pop culture and the traditions of historically black fraternities and sororities. Despite centuries-old history, Step Afrika! is the first professional stepping company. Combining influences from other dance forms, their high-energy and heart-pumping performances tell a story through stomps, claps and synchronized techniques. Though their moves seem on par with Olympic-level gymnastics, some dances are impressively elevated when performed in business wear – belts, vests and all. This year’s performance is special in more ways than one for the company, as 2019 commemorates 25 years since President Nelson Mandela’s election. $34-$75. The Music Center at Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 – SUNDAY MARCH 10

Nell Gwynn
At first blush, this is the tale of the life and times of one of King Charles II of England’s many mistresses: the titular Nell Gwynn. Dig deeper and you’ll find a glimpse into the transformative history of women breaking boundaries while cracking jokes. Nell is caught heckling performers at a play, and instead of being cast out for her behavior, it leads her to be one of the first women cast as a player in the King’s company. This eventually finds Nell in the arms of the King, but her personal journey is more captivating than any love story. If someone in 17th-century England can concede that women – even ones who heckle – are funny, we can surely stop arguing about that today. Don’t miss Nell’s remarkable ride this winter. Folger Theatre: 201 E. Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

BLKS

February

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

BLKS
Sex and the City has a way different meaning for Octavia, a New York City native who had a serious STD scare. Like any rational 20-something undergoing a stressful, possibly life-changing trauma, she decides she’ll need the help of her best girlfriends, June and Imani, to navigate her next steps. The trio experience much of what you’d expect when gallivanting around the city after dark: interactions with attractive men and women whose words and personalities ruin any romantic and sexual pursuit. The way the girls’ encounters interact with their identities is a prominent message in this production. They’re women, they’re millennials and they’re black – and even though they’re close, this one night has them jumping over hurdles that will either strengthen their bond or completely break through it. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: 641 D St. NW, DC; www.woollymammoth.net

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – SUNDAY, MARCH 10

The Heiress
It is an unfortunate worldwide truth that money cannot replace the love of another person. Catherine Sloper, the heiress in question, is a prime example. She’s been raised in 1840s New York and is monetarily wealthy but poor in affection. Any shred of her father’s warmth has been guarded since her mother died during childbirth – and she’s never been one with many admirers. She’s socially awkward – much more relatable than inherited wealth – and not obviously beautiful. Catherine has long learned to be complacent with what she has, until a cute guy takes interest in her and she finally feels the adoration she’s missed her whole life. This live love story may or may not make you cry. Arena Stage’s Fichandler Stage: 1101 6th St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

Finding Neverland the Musical
With just a bit of faith, trust and pixie dust, playwright J.M. Barrie gave us the classic, dreamy tale of Peter Pan and Neverland – a sweet escape from bedtimes and lecturing fathers. Finding Neverland the Musical offers a behind-the-scenes look at Barrie’s inspiration, introducing the real George, Michael and Peter in his life. Just when Barrie stopped believing, he met the family that sparked the magic he needed in his own career as a writer. There’s something heartwarming about the story that sprouted imagination in so many children being born from the real make-believe games of young boys. If there’s anything that connects us all through time and geography, it’s our longing to see more than what appears and create new worlds. Don’t miss the spectacular reimagining of the story behind the story. Tickets $54 and up. National Theatre: 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.findingneverlandthemusical.com

Queen of Basel

March

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – SUNDAY, MARCH 31

Vanity Fair
Playwright Kate Hamill takes William Makepeace Thackeray’s “novel without a hero” to the stage with new eyes for the character’s complex, vivacious inner lives. This adaptation sees good friends Amelia and Becky make their way through the world in a society that’s unforgiving to women regardless of appearance, wealth or status. At the heart of Hamill’s take is the beauty and strength of female friendship that allows the women to overcome the patriarchal boundaries that attempt to restrict them. And while the original novel was written in the mid-1800s, the story is just as relevant today. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall: 610 F St. NW, DC; www.shakespearetheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 – SUNDAY APRIL 7

Queen of Basel
Anyone rich and famous on the Sunshine State’s coast is partying away for the week-long Art Basel. It seems like a high point for Julie, whose father’s savvy hotel property investments got her the extra star treatment in a swanky room. She’s engaged, it’s her hotel and nothing can go wrong. But before the party ends, she’s single again and stuck in a tight space with hotel employees. Julie learns of the other side of Miami from Floridians who live in the slums – still the luckier side of the coin compared to Venezuela, where employee Christine fled from political dangers. Julie never expected to celebrate Art Basel hiding from her loved ones, but what she gains from speaking with Christine is more valuable than what a price tag can note. Tickets $20-$80. Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 – SATURDAY, APRIL 6

Hands on a Hardbody
This new take on a truly American experience deals with relationships, immigration, transportation and more. Ten Texans from all different walks of life vie for a truck in a “hands on a hardbody” contest in the hot summer sun. As they fight for a new set of wheels, this off-the-wall environment brings truths about the contest, each contestant and their community to light. Based on a documentary of the same name that premiered in 1997, the story feels every bit as relevant more than a decade later. Tickets begin at $52. Keegan Theatre: 1742 Church St. NW, DC; www.keegantheatre.com

Grand Hotel

April

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 – SATURDAY, APRIL 20

Columbinus
It’s been 20 years since the Columbine High School massacre, and tragically, the United States has not seen improvement in keeping students safe from school shootings. A new wave of teens from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are continuing to push the fight forward. This docudrama comes at a compelling time to remind us all of where we started, and how it hasn’t gotten better two decades later. Among all the difficulties and growing pains that characterize “teenage angst,” it’s unimaginable to feel the way the Columbine and MSD students did. Columbinus combines real interviews from the time of the shooting with survivors, the parents and others in the community. For those involved in the debate or who are passionate about reform, this is likely to generate new discussions on the matter. 1st Stage: 1524 Spring Hill Rd. Tysons, VA; www.1ststagetysons.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 2 – SUNDAY, MAY 12

Grand Hotel
Berlin in the 1920s was a precious period of creative and economic prosperity. What better way to peek into the lives of Berlin’s personalities than visiting a hotel? The Grand Hotel sees many swinging its doors and booking rooms, causing lots of mix-matches to collide and mingle – like the ballerina who jetés into the hotel and has unlikely interactions with a bookkeeper, as well as a typist and a baron. This musical will feature some special performances including discussion nights, a pride night and a performance with open captioning. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 – SUNDAY, MAY 19

Oslo
This three-hour play is based on the true story of a husband-and-wife diplomat team who, unbeknownst to the proper channels, organized instrumental meetings between Israel and Palestine during the Oslo Accords in the early 1990s. As the conflict between those two countries rages on nearly 25 years later, this play provides eloquent insight into a very real and very modern attempt to solve one of the most complicated conflicts in human history. Round House Theatre: 4545 East-West Hwy. Bethesda, MD; www.roundhousetheatre.org

Capture

May

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 – SUNDAY, JUNE 2

The Children
Two retired nuclear physicists live on an island and require stringent routines to get through each day. They’re seemingly making it work, surrounding themselves with healthy food and yoga practice – despite the fact they’re living in a post-apocalyptic world in the aftermath of a nuclear explosion. The couple’s calculated days are brought to a screeching halt with the unexplained appearance of a former coworker, who comes bearing a nasty nosebleed and an even nastier secret. A slow-burning meditation on humankind’s responsibility as stewards of the earth, there couldn’t be a better time to experience this critically acclaimed modern tale. Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 – SUNDAY, JUNE 16

Sooner/Later
With To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and other rom-coms dominating the film industry, it’s still unlikely to follow the dating life of a woman who is the single mother of a teenage girl. We usually view the story solely from the teen perspective. This production gives Gilmore Girls vibes, with the charming closeness of a mother and daughter who have a friendly, supportive relationship rather than a strictly parent-child one. But enter one more character who kind of disrupts the dynamic: the man, the love interest, the newcomer. Mosaic Theater Company describes its production as navigating the pains and pleasure of romance, marriage and parenting with a “metaphysical twist.” You’ll want to watch this play sooner rather than later (ha). As a lesser-heard type of story, Sooner/Later needs support to get more stories like it onstage – and maybe you can even bond with your own mom at a performance. Atlas Performing Arts Center: 1333 H St. NE, DC; www.mosaictheater.org

FRIDAY, MAY 17 AND SUNDAY, MAY 19

An Evening of Verdi
The Maryland Lyric Opera has brought numerous works to the DC area since its founding in 2014, and its 2019 season will be no exception. The opera’s talented cast brings the works of famed Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi to the Music Center at Strathmore’s halls. The performance is the perfect outing for opera lovers or those just being introduced to the craft. The Music Center at Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org

Small Mouth Sounds

Stage and Screen: September 2018

Through Sunday, September 23

Small Mouth Sounds
Six people sit in silence, escaping city noises and distractions in favor of necessary self-reflection. Cell phones? Not allowed. But then again, the retreat is led by a guru who can’t quite stick to the rules. Small Mouth Sounds serves as an adult edition of The Breakfast Club with a minimal set and sound. As you put your phone on silent and immerse yourself in the story, you might be surprised by your own self-reflection. Tickets are $51-$60. Round House Theatre: 4545 East-West Hwy. Bethesda, MD; www.roundhousetheatre.org

Monday, September 3 – Sunday, September 30

Gloria
As a journalist, writing about the lives of others becomes second nature. But when tragedy strikes a New York-based magazine, who gets to tell the story? After stories from iconic newsrooms have hit the big screen (Spotlight, The Post), Gloria acts out a contemporary journalism story – especially in light of the recent horror faced by staffers at the Capital Gazette. Tickets are $20-$41. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: 641 D St. NW, DC; www.woollymammoth.net

Tuesday, September 4 – Sunday, September 23

Macbeth
Step away from the toil and trouble of daily life and get into the spooky season with this adaptation of Macbeth. Witches promise him a future of riches and royalty, but Macbeth is too hungry to wait. A hero turns into a murderer, and the psychological aftermath spirals him and others involved into madness. Under director Robert Richmond, the timeless tale takes on a more modern life with some newly added scenes. Folger’s production features music performed by the Folger Consort, and is adapted and amended by Sir William Davenant. Adapted or not, one lesson remains the same: don’t trust a witch. Tickets are $42-$79. Folger Theatre: 201 E. Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

Thursday, September 6 – Sunday, September 16

DC Shorts Film Festival
Experience 10 days of film with more than 130 movie options at the 2018 DC Shorts Film Festival. These indie films from around the world are also competing for titles like Best Local DMV Film, Best Animation and Best International Narrative. You’ll watch up to nine films in each 90-minute screening session, so attending just one or two sessions will expose you to many new perspectives from talented filmmakers. After watching, mingle with fellow film buffs at the various festival parties with cocktails, food and music included. Tickets prices vary. DC Shorts Film Festival: Various locations around DC; www.festival.dcshorts.com

Friday, September 7

On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope Discussion
Politics and Prose hosts a conversation removed from the Twittersphere on politics, culture and the Black Lives Matter movement with activist DeRay Mckesson. He was there at a pivotal moment for modern day civil rights – 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri – and now all of his experiences are bound in his new book On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope. The book “offers a new framework and language for understanding the nature of oppression,” according to its summary. Share in the discussion or come to learn. Each event on Mckesson’s tour will feature a special guest. Tickets are $10 for students, $26-$28 for non-students. Book included in ticket price. GW’s Lisner Auditorium: 730 21st St. NW, DC; www.politics-prose.com

Saturday, September 15

Kevin Hart: The Irresponsible Tour
Work hard, laugh hard. Except Kevin Hart’s the one working to make you laugh. The actor and comedian is stopping in DC for The Irresponsible Tour with all-new material. Twitter users have applauded the show online, saying the show’s worth every dollar. Hart also has a new movie with Tiffany Haddish out this month, Night School, making you wonder if he ran his jokes with her and was influenced by a fellow comedic genius. Despite his stature – the punchline to many jokes – Hart is only getting bigger in the comedy world. Tickets are $34 and up. Capital One Arena: 601 F St. NW, DC; www.kevinhartnation.com

Tuesday, September 18 – Sunday, November 11

Heisenberg
When 75-year-old Alex gets a surprise smooch from a comparatively younger stranger named Georgie, it’s not exactly what he expected when boarding the train on this average day. Even less expected was her finding him at his butcher shop sometime after the encounter. Georgie is confusing. Alex is confused. And so is the audience – left in suspense as the play’s runtime begins to unravel her true intentions. This unlikely duo with romantic relations is just another experiment conducted by Tony Award-winning playwright Simon Stephens. He’s just letting the audience in on his conclusive results. Tickets are $40-$89. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

Friday, September 21 – Sunday, October 21

Born Yesterday
For DC natives, Born Yesterday may seem like an all-too-familiar story about gaining political power in the hub of the power hungry. But this satire set in the 1940s is more of a comedic retreat from the current stressful affairs, and the winnings don’t go to a who but to a what: the truth. Ford’s Theatre calls this production directed by Aaron Posner “political satire meets romantic comedy,” but all good stories are grounded in reality. Watch this for an entertaining mashup of unlikely allies and girl power to fight corruption. Tickets are $20-$62. Ford’s Theatre: 511 10th St. NW, DC; www.fords.org

Wednesday, September 26

Welcome to Night Vale Live Show
First-time visitors and regular listeners of the Night Vale podcast have a chance to experience a brand-new storyline with a live show tour. The alternate reality podcast production “promises to find unexpected ways to bring the audience into the performance,” according to the Welcome to Night Vale site. Live music by Disparition and special surprise guests will get you totally immersed in the mystery and spooky wonders of the small desert town brought to the Lincoln Theatre stage. In Night Vale, anything can happen. Prepare by tuning in to past episodes online. Tickets are $35. Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

Houndmouth

Music Picks: June 2018

TUESDAY, JUNE 5

Hop Along
Genre-bending Philadelphia outfit Hop Along is led by Frances Quinlan, an incredibly gifted songwriter. She used the band’s most recent release Bark Your Head Off, Dog to meditate on finding her voice as an individual, which in turn lead to the four-person group finding their voice as a band. The band’s most musically stunning release to date also deals with timely themes like abuse of power, made even more impactful by Quinlan’s impossible-to-pin-down vocal power. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $20. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

Francis and the Lights
There are few better songs to wake up to than “Morning,” the album-opener off of Francis and the Lights’ 2017 record Just for Us. The piano that drives the song is so simple you imagine anyone in the house could play it, but there’s something about it that just makes you feel good. It’s like a lot of his other songs, they feel like they’re coming from an honest, if naive, place. It’s that quality, plus his production chops, that scored Francis so many collaboration credits, including with Chance The Rapper and Frank Ocean. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Horse Feathers
I am thoroughly convinced there is no song better for staring at your ceiling and being sad to than “Curs in the Weeds.” Horse Feathers manages to be sparse and lush at the same time, mostly due to the silvery slick vocals of frontman Justin Ringles paired with subtle string arrangements. Their latest album Appreciation adds some soul arrangements in the mix, keeping this hidden gem folk band’s catalog ever fresh. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $17. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC: www.unionstage.com

Yung Heazy
Yung Heazy may not boast an extensive discography, (as of this writing, he has only three official tracks to his name, though his debut LP comes out June 1), but he does boast a good story. Yung Heazy got his start for love, not for love of music, but for love of a girl. He uploaded the single “Cuz You’re My Girl” to SoundCloud on Valentine’s Day 2017 and it blew up. More songs followed and now he’s on tour. Doors are at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $10. Songbyrd Music House and Record Cafe: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

FRIDAY JUNE 8

Future Generations
Future Generations’ breakout single “Stars” boasts 10 million plays on Spotify, proof that the band’s brand of piano pop is certainly something you’ll want to hit repeat on. Friends for seven years, the band surely does sound like they’re having tons of fun together. Their second album is in the works, and will be produced by Justin Gerrish, who perhaps most famously worked with Vampire Weekend on their sophomore effort Contra. Be sure to see Future Generations before they’re similarly catapulted into second album stardom. Doors open at 9 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E, Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com

Mykki Blanco
Where to start with Mykki Blanco? He’s fearless. He got his start in music as a “teenage drag rapper.” I’ve never seen or heard anything like his music. He’s
published a book of poetry, From the Silence of Duchamp to the Noise of Boys. He lived for two years as a woman, though he didn’t surgically transition. But that’s all categorical noise. Listen to his music, the production moves between lush and harsh, and lyrically he’s both heartfelt and outrageous. Listen for the strings on “High School Never Ends,” listen for the beat on “Wavvy.” You can find videos for each on YouTube. Doors are at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

SATURDAY JUNE 9

Belle and Sebastian
If you’re feeling sinister, catch Belle and Sebastian’s return to DC at The Anthem. For a band that has been releasing music for almost as long as I have been alive, the Scottish twee legends show no signs of stopping additions to their impressive discography or touring schedule any time soon. I caught them at Merriweather Post Pavilion last summer and can attest to the fact that while there will be some new tunes, (the band just released a series of three EPs back to back) Stuart Murdoch and company still play a plethora of their heartfelt hits. You’ll be better for hearing “Piazza, New York Catcher” in person. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $46. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

Kingman Island Bluegrass and Folk Festival
The annual showcase of the best in local and national folk and bluegrass scene is back this year with featured artists like Gangstagrass, Jonny Grave, Cris Jacobs and Letitia VanSant. In addition to a stacked lineup, Kingman Island offers plenty of food trucks, crafts for sale and no shortage of the best up and coming local acts of the genre. Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Tickets start at $35. Kingman Island: 575 Oklahoma Ave. NE, DC: www.kingmanislandbluegrass.info

SUNDAY, JUNE 10

Shamir
No one has a voice like Shamir, and once you hear it, you’ll be hooked. It’s angelic and light as a feather. The young artist has a number of releases to his name. After his 2017 record Revelations, he’s already released two singles in 2018: “Room” and “Caballero.” The songs exhibit a strong indie rock influence and remind you that Shamir is not just a vocalist but also a guitar player. The tracks though, like so many of his songs, still feels married to pop, even he’s lyrically unto himself. Doors are at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

MONDAY, JUNE 11

La Luz
Floating Features, the latest record from surf rock quartet La Luz, came out in mid-May. It’s their first since 2015’s Weirdo Shine. Their sound is similar; there’s still the chugging surf rock guitars and the doo wop harmonies, but you can tell there’s been a lot of development. The texture is richer and the progressions sweeter, but it’s in their lyrics that you can find the most development. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $13. Songbyrd Music House and Record Cafe: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

TUESDAY JUNE 12

The Horrors
Few bands can vacillate between the dark and brooding and the expansive and sparkling like this English outfit, and that’s what makes them so great. They released another perfect marriage of dark and light with V last fall and are now hitting the states to promote it with their signature black suits, buckled Chelsea boots and all. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

Snail Mail
Eighteen-year-old Lindsey Jordan has a well-deserved amount of buzz around her band Snail Mail. The youngest to ever sign to iconic label Matador Records, Jordan’s guitar chops and lyrical prowess are well beyond her years. This record release show will serve as a kickoff for the band’s heavily anticipated album Lush, and most likely mark what will be a long and successful career for the wildly talented Jordan. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC;
www.blackcatdc.com

Vance Joy
No one could escape the permanence of Vance Joy’s earworm of a single “Riptide” upon its release in 2014. In fact, I heard it on the radio driving into work this morning. But as it turns out, the Australian singer-songwriter’s other songs are just as buzzworthy and his sophomore release Nation of Two was no exception. Be sure not to miss his joyous (pun absolutely intended) melodies and the opportunity to hear “Riptide” for the thousandth time. Tickets start at $55. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

Pianos Become the Teeth & The World Is a Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid to Die
I had to read this lineup twice to be sure I was in for seeing not one but two incredible post-punk outfits in one night. Pianos Become the Teeth found their footing with this year’s spectacular Wait For Love, and TWIABP (as fans lovingly call them) are something of an indie supergroup whose combination of orchestral sounds with emo lyrical sensibilities sets them apart in a league all their own. Don’t miss your chance to see them both in one place. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $17. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC: www.unionstage.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 15

Field Medic
Kevin Patrick has fully embraced the home recording process as an authentic way of recording, which pairs beautifully with his sparse and honest lyrical style. His 2017 release is a collection of songs he recorded in a sunroom in San Francisco. Patrick is expected to release a full-length record in 2018 after his recent signing to Run for Cover. Patrick’s lyrical explorations of love and longing will make for a beautiful singalong at his DC show this summer. Tickets start at $10. Songbyrd Music House and Record Cafe: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

Middle Kids
Even if you’ve never heard of Middle Kids, you’ve probably heard Middle Kids. The Australia natives have been garnering a quiet but strong buzz throughout the festival circuit and blogosphere throughout the past several years with radio ready jams like “Edge of Town.” Their first full-length album solidified their place as indie rock strongholds in its heartfelt explorations of love, loss and life. Tickets are $15. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

Cold Cave
Get ready for a darkwave dream at Black Cat – while Cold Cave are respected in their own right, they’re joined by genre greats Black Marble and Choir Boy. Cold Cave’s last full-length album was released in 2014, but they treated listeners to 18 minutes of bliss with this spring’s release of the You & Me & Infinity EP – maybe they’ll even debut some newer digs at this show. Anyone who’s into dancing and crying, specifically at the same time, can’t miss this gloriously goth lineup. Doors open at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 17

Houndmouth
If you’re looking for a raucous Saturday night that’s not just drinking at bars, look no further than a Houndmouth show. The band made a splash with karaoke-worthy songs like “Sedona” and “Say It,” combining the lyrical sensibilities of folk with the instrumental prowess of garage rockers for an outcome that is equal parts fun and cathartic. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20

Alexis Taylor
Perhaps best known as the frontman of Hot Chip, Alexis Taylor’s most recent solo release was born of his love for playing to smaller audiences on his own. Hot Chip fans will recognize Taylor’s distinct voice, but everything else about his music is totally unique from his iconic band. Not to worry though, it’s still extremely groovy, so come prepared with your dancing shoes. Doors open at 7 p.m. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC: www.ustreetmusichall.com

Ray LaMontagne & Neko Case
Both legends in their own right, Case and LaMontagne are teaming up for a night of flourishing folk at The Anthem. Not only do you get to see two iconic musicians in one night, this show will also serve as the official kickoff to the inaugural run of Halcyon’s By The People Festival, an arts and dialogue festival “bringing people together around the themes of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” It’s a win-win for all involved. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $55. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 21

Yeek
L.A. songwriter Yeek stands comfortably outside of any particular genre. His guitars smack of indie rock and Mac DeMarco slacker rock, but lyrically he’s closer to hip-hop. And his latest release, 2018’s Blackheart EP, does even more to somehow evoke both genres at once. Hampton, Virginia native Marco McKinnis will open for Yeek. McKinnis doesn’t have a ton of material, but what he has is gorgeous, beautifully produced and rich R&B. Doors are at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

MONDAY, JUNE 25

serpentwithfeet’
My first encounter with serpentwithfeet was actually in a Björk release called Blissing Me. The release contains two remixes of “Blissing Me,” a single off of the record Utopia. One version was a harp-only version of the track which, like much of album, was coproduced by Arca. The other remix was done by serpentwithfeet, who added lyrics and beats. It’s a collaboration which feels seamless. serpentwithfeet’s almost improvisational style approach to melody is of a piece with Björk’s, and his voice is no less effortless. And like with Arca, after getting the Björk stamp of approval, I think serpentwithfeet’s certainly onto big things. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $12. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

TUESDAY, JUNE 26

Katie Von Schleicher
“100 percent quality assurance, I have a degree in songwriting,” reads the Twitter bio of Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Katie von Schleicher. Her career got started when her internship turned into a record deal for Ba Da Bing! Records. Von Schleicher’s tracks aren’t so light as label-mates Beirut, but they are deft. The sound hearkens back to the 70s, and the tone isn’t so dark as her record titles, Shitty Hits (2017) and Bleaksploitation (2015), might suggest. They’re more lo-fi pop than heart-heavy indie. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $10. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

We Are Scientists
Synth pop heavy hitters We Are Scientists are back with a new album and tour, but I’m secretly hoping the show will read as more of a 10-year homage to 2008’s brilliant Brain Thrust Mastery. While I’m sure this isn’t the case, I can dream, and also dance along to certifiable bops like “Nobody Move, Nobody Get Hurt” and “After Hours.” Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $18. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27

Sam Gellaitry
Musical prodigies often seem to be reserved for classical music. There was Mozart and then there’s the kid who played jazz at the age of six. But Sam Gellaitry is a prodigy in the electronic community. The Scottish producer started making music at 12, dropped out of school to make music at 16 and now, at 21, he travels the world making music. His music is eclectic electronic. Some samples evince a youth spent playing video games and other recall producers like Bonobo and Emancipator. It’s his use of vocal samples that makes his tracks stand out for me. Doors open at 9 p.m. Tickets are $15. Flash: 645 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.flashdc.com

TV Girl
While TV Girl’s moniker is a little on the nose – I can’t help but think that most of their sound is so heavily drawn from 80s and 90s TV background music – their straightforward bordering on self-deprecating lyrics (see: “Hate Yourself”) keep them ever relatable. The band brands their music as “you can sing along to it, but I wouldn’t sing around your parents,” so it’s sure to be a good time. Tickets start at $15. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

SUNDAY, JULY 1

Oso Oso
Oso Oso’s most recent release, The Yunahon Mixtape, is a beautiful, relatable callout to all the best aspects of early 2000s indie rock. Frontman Jade Lilitri borrows these sensibilities and makes them feel fresh for a new generation to rely on as an outlet for their feelings. The band brings their post-rock reinventions to Songbyrd early this July, fresh off of signing with Triple Crown Records after self-releasing The Yunahon Mixtape. There are big things in the future for this band – don’t miss out. Tickets start at $10. Songbyrd Music House and Record Cafe: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

Photo: Courtesy of Supreme Core Cider
Photo: Courtesy of Supreme Core Cider

What’s On Tap: Supreme Core Cider Opens Taste Room in District

The story of Supreme Core Cider comes with cider love at first sight – or something close to that. After meeting on a message board and bonding over their adoration for niche cideries on the Left Coast, Will Sullivan and Kyle Crosby figured they’d bring the craft beer aesthetic with a twist to the District. After three years of hard work, architectural investigations and a ton of science experiments involving apples, Supreme Core Cider opened the doors to its taproom on May 12. Just weeks after they began welcoming cider diehards and neophytes into their Ivy City location, we caught up with Sullivan to discuss all things cider.

On Tap: How did you and Kyle meet? When did the idea of a cidery come up?
Will Sullivan: We actually met on a local cidermakers’ chat forum – basically, a place where weirdos hang out and make ciders, and talk recipes, equipment and procedures. I put it out there that I was going to start one in DC, and we started chatting and got together. He ended up having a similar vision, and we had a good alignment there. We’re both craft beer guys at heart, and we wanted to approach cider like craft beer is approached. Our mission is [to use] available input to put out high-integrity, all-natural ciders. We try to source locally. We use real fruits, and our barrel programs are all from local producers.

OT: What do you mean by “real stuff” when it comes to cider?
WS: I’ll start by saying that the cideries we look up to are in the Pacific Northwest in Washington and Oregon, like 2 Towns Ciderhouse and Schilling Hard Cider. They come from a great craft beer culture, and they’re making really great products. Our goal is to hit the sweet spot and work with orchards throughout the season – be less like a winery and more like a brewery, in terms of how you feel when you’re inside and the palate we’re carving out.

OT: What can people expect from the drinks you offer? How did locals respond to your official opening?
WS: People really seemed to like it. We’ve been in the market since September, producing offsite while we waited for the taproom. The fact that we’re hitting the market with something that just wasn’t here – people are excited about that. We’re not for you if you’re into super sweet, but we’re the guys who are making cider without a crazy reliability on sugar. We’ve participated in a bunch of events. We did Snallygaster and different cider festivals. We were involved in a big festival at Nats Park. We do a ton of tastings to introduce people to our ciders, neighborhood by neighborhood.

OT: Now that you’ve accomplished opening the tap room, what’s next for you guys?
WS: Total and complete global domination [laughs]. We’re lucky to get in the market and interact with people. Our goal is to get people to our facility, and a big part of what we’re doing here is educational and cultural. We’re always going to have more than what’s on our website at the taproom. We want people to come and see our crazy experiments. Cider can be a cool beverage, but it can also anchor a culture like craft beer does.

Supreme Core Cider’s taproom is open on Saturdays and Sundays from 12-8 p.m. Follow them on social media at @supremecorecider.

Supreme Core Cider: 2406 T St. NE, DC; 202-215-5029; www.supremecorecider.com


Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

The Reverie Beer Dinner
Join Rustico Ballston for an unforgettable evening of beer and food with their friends from Reverie Distribution. Taste featured beers from five different breweries from Reverie’s portfolio alongside a specially designed menu by chef de cuisine Stephen McRae. 7-9 p.m. Reservations are required. $55. Rustico Ballston: 4075 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA; www.rusticorestaurant.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

Beer and Board Games at Sugar Shack
A little beer, a little sugar, classic board games and a few of your friends – it’s the perfect casual weeknight hang out every Thursday at Sugar Shack Arlington. On alternating Thursdays they’ll have a new craft brewery in house to talk beer and take over the three taps for two weeks. Flights, pints, beer glazed donut hole pairings and more. 4:30-9 p.m. Free to attend. Sugar Shack Donuts & Coffee: 1014 S. Glebe Rd. Arlington, VA; www.sugarshackdonuts.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

Lagunitas Beer Dinner
Join Wildfire for a summer beer dinner when Wildfire’s executive chefs prepare a four-course custom menu paired with craft brews from Lagunitas Brewing Company. William Stanfield of Lagunitas Brewing Company will join as guest speaker for the evening. The dinner begins with a reception of passed appetizers and the first pairing at 6:30-8 p.m. $60. Wildfire at Tysons Galleria: 2001 International Dr. 3rd floor, McLean, VA; www.wildfirerestaurant.com/mclean

Tinner Hill Blues, Brews & BBQ Block Party
Join as Mad Fox closes the Market Square, fires-up the smoker and kicks-off Falls Church’s Tinner Hill Blues Festival with their inaugural Blues, Brews and BBQ Block Party. They will have live Blues music, great food and award-winning Mad Fox beer. 4-10 p.m. Outdoor Block Party ends at 10 p.m. but the restaurant will still be open for even more fun and beer. $7-$10 (beer and barbecue not included). Mad Fox Brewing Company: 444 West Broad St. Falls Church, VA; www.madfoxbrewing.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 and JUNE 15

Brewmaster Tours
Spend your evening like a brewmaster! Admission includes an hour-long guided tour of the museum and a local craft beer tasting. Receive one beer flight per person featuring 4-oz. pours of three local beers, and experience the Brewmaster’s Castle with a drink in your hand. This month, the tours will feature a special tasting of Aslin beer. Guests must be 21+ to attend. 5-6:30 p.m. $30. Heurich House Museum: 1307 New Hampshire Ave. NW, DC; www.heurichhouse.org

MONDAY, JUNE 11

Dynamic Duos Aslin and Southern Grist: 20 Rare Drafts
ChurchKey welcomes Aslin Beer Company and Southern Grist Brewing to pour 20 different beers from the two incredible breweries. Rarely available in DC, Southern Grist has sent an unbelievable lineup of beers, including their collaboration with Aslin, Pushing Buttons. This Sour IPA was brewed with oranges, lemons, limes, lactose, vanilla and Jasmine tea. Not to be outdone, the friends at Aslin have sent a slew of specialties, including Cotton, an Imperial Pastry Stout finished with vanilla beans, cocoa nibs, coffee, coconut flakes, marshmallow and macadamia nuts. All Aslin and Southern Grist beers will be priced individually. 4-11 p.m. Free to attend. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

The Decadent Ales Showcase
ChurchKey welcomes the fine folks from Decadent Ales with pours of seven hard-to-find beers from the upstate New York brewery and host founder Paul Pignataro. Located in Mamoraneck, New York, Decadent Ales is known for brewing juicy, hazy IPAs and rich, dessert-inspired pastry stouts. Only recently available in the DC metro area, we can’t wait for you to taste these incredible beers. 4-11 p.m. There is no admission fee for this event. All Decadent beers will be priced individually by the glass and in 4-oz. tasting pours. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

The Power of Positive Drinking
The Power of Positive Drinking is back with more great, free comedy featuring some of the best up-and-coming comedians in the DMV. All performers pair nicely with Port City Brewing Company’s delicious craft beer. They will be offering beer in pitchers, so you and your friends won’t miss the show. Doors at 6:30 p.m., event from 7-9 p.m. Port City Brewing Company: 3950 Wheeler Ave. Alexandria, VA; www.portcitybrewing.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 15 – SATURDAY, JUNE 16

Beer, Bourbon & BBQ Festival
Get ready for two big days of beer sipping, bourbon tasting, music listening and barbecue eating. Your admission buys you a sampling glass so you can enjoy an all you can taste samplings of beer and bourbon. Some of the best barbecue vendors will be onsite if you get hungry, in addition to enjoyable seminars in the tasting theater and live music all day. Featuring 60-plus beers, 40 bourbons and tons of barbecue. 6-10 p.m. on Friday, 2-6 p.m. on Saturday. $45-$120. The Plateau: 300 Waterfront St. National Harbor, MD; www.beerandbourbon.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

Bluegrass and Crawfish Boil with Rare Craft Beers
For those who haven’t experienced the fine tradition of a Southern Lowcountry boil, this is just the event for you. Join in the outdoor courtyard, where Rustico Ballston’s own chef de cuisine Stephen McRae will be serving up a feast of fresh Louisiana crawfish, Andouille sausage, corn on the cob and red potatoes. No crawfish boil is complete without a cold beer in-hand, so four Virginia breweries will be there to make sure your glasses don’t go empty. Enjoy everything from lawn games to live bluegrass performances from The Grandsons and Jonny Grave. 12-7 p.m. Free to attend. Rustico Ballston: 4075 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA; www.rusticorestaurant.com

Pedals ‘N’ Pints: June Short Ride
Are you a bicyclist who loves beer and lives in the DMV? Be a part of Port City’s Pedals ‘N’ Pints June Short Ride. Come gather for coffee and donuts before departing for a ride, then return to plentiful brews and The Big Cheese food truck. It will be a little more than a 10-mile route from the front door of the tasting room out to the park, up to Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC) and back. 10:45 a.m. – 12 p.m. Port City Brewing Company: 3950 Wheeler Ave. Alexandria, VA; www.portcitybrewing.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 21

Heavy Seas Beer Tasting
Be the first to the fiesta with a tap takeover with Flying Dog Brewery. Each ticket grants you three different tastes, complimentary house-made chips and more. Additional beers can be purchased for $5 during happy hour until 7 p.m. After, draft beers are $7. 4-10 p.m. Station Kitchen & Cocktails at The Embassy Row Hotel: 2015 Massachusetts Ave. NW, DC; www.destinationhotels.com/embassy-row-hotel

SATURDAY, JUNE 23

Beer 101 at Mad Fox Brewing
Learn all about your favorite craft beers from production to taste characteristics at the Mad Fox Beer 101 class lead by CEO and executive brewer Bill Madden, who is a veteran of the brewing industry. The ticket price includes a brewery tour with a Q&A, a beer sampler handpicked by the brewers themselves, a discussion and a bar snack. There are only 20 slots available for each class. 4-5:30 p.m. $15. Mad Fox Brewing: 444 W. Broad St. Falls Church, VA; www.madfoxbrewing.com

It’s Raining Cats and Dogs: Derecho Party
Celebrate the return of summer and Derecho Common with a party in the Port City parking lot and fundraiser for Friends of Puerto Rico. Port City has also invited Lost Dog and Cat Rescue Foundation to host a pet adoption from 2-4 p.m., so grab a pint and go home with a six-pack and a puppy (please only adopt a puppy if you have time and a loving home for them). Starting at 5 p.m., enjoy live music all night from Levi Stephens and Rabid Flash MoB and friends. Two food trucks will be onsite to satisfy your hunger, Rocklands BBQ and DC Slices. 12-10 p.m. Port City Brewing Company: 3950 Wheeler Ave. Alexandria, VA; www.portcitybrewing.com

MONDAY, JUNE 25

Nama’stay for Beer
Roll out your mat on a deck overlooking the DC horizon for an exhilarating yoga experience under the beautiful sky. You will spend your first hour moving and breathing mindfully in a vinyasa flow, then walk to the tasting room of Heritage Brewing Co. at Market Common for post-class libations. Meet on the top deck of the Fillmore St. Parking Garage (across from Heritage) by 6:45 p.m. to set up your mat. 6:45-8:30 p.m. Each ticket includes an all-levels yoga class and your first drink after class. BYO mat. $20-$25. Heritage Brewing Co. Market Common Brewpub & Roastery: 1300-1398 N. Fillmore St. Arlington, VA; www.heritagebrewing.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 30

Red, White & Brew Festival
Show your patriotic colors while you kick back with friends, food, tunes and a sweet selection of reds, whites and brews. There’s no better way to raise a flag (and a toast) to Uncle Sam than by drinking in America’s fruits of the vine and amber waves of grain. Every ticket purchase gives you unlimited full pours of American beer, unlimited tastings of 100-plus wines, craft beers and ciders, plus access to area food trucks, a local artisan market, live music and entertainment all day. 1-9 p.m. (Session 1 from 1-4 p.m. and Session 2 from 6-9 p.m.) $29-$89. Akridge Lot at Buzzard Point: 1926 2nd St. SW, DC; www.rwbrewfest.com

The Mystery of Edwin Drood

Stage and Screen: April 2018

THURSDAY, MARCH 29 – SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Paper Dolls
This quirky and provocative karaoke musical follows the experiences of five gay male Filipino nurses in Tel Aviv who care for elderly Orthodox and Chasidic men six days a week. But instead of white Keds and scrubs, these fab male nurses don high heels and boa scarves on their day off to headline a drag show. Based on the true story behind a 2006 Israeli documentary, Paper Dolls confronts the challenges that migrant workers face while yearning for citizenship and a place to belong. This American premiere is part of the 2018 Voices from a Changing Middle East Festival and directed by veteran Broadway director Mark Brokaw. Tickets start at $20. Atlas Performing Arts Center: 1333 H St. NE, DC; www.atlasarts.org

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 – SUNDAY, APRIL 29

Two Trains Running
Two Trains Running examines everyday life for black Americans in 1969 as tremors of the Civil Rights Movement reach Pittsburgh’s Hill District, which was one of the most prosperous, culturally active black neighborhoods in the country in the 40s and 50s. But when the 60s rolled around, the Hill District faced a sharp economic decline. Playwright August Wilson directly comments on this regression when Memphis Lee’s diner, the center of the Hill District’s community, is slated to be demolished. Arena Stage’s website describes it best: “Confronted with the reality of a rapidly changing world, Memphis and his regular customers struggle to maintain their solidarity and sense of pride.” Tickets start at $81; check website for information on discounts. Arena Stage: 1101 6th St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 – SUNDAY, APRIL 29

The Mystery of Edwin Drood (Symphonic Metal Version)
This reenactment of Charles Dickens’ unfinished novel will have you headbanging so hard, your neck will hurt for days. Landless Theatre Company and British-American composer, dramatist and author Rupert Holmes come together to transform Tony Award-winning musical, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, into a hard rock masterpiece. Tickets are $25. Capital Fringe: 1358 Florida Ave. NE, DC; www.capitalfringe.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 12 – SUNDAY, MAY 6

Witch
Strong, bold and powerful women have been feared, objectified and discouraged for many, many generations – especially when their power has challenged the status quo of that particular moment in history. Witch explores the thread that connects the Salem witch trials in the late 1600s to modern politics, examining the stories of women who have been labeled and chastised as witches throughout the centuries. This musical is sure to make you think long and hard about what it means to be a woman in the modern age, and what it must’ve felt like back then. Tickets start at $30. Creative Cauldron: 410 S Maple Ave. Falls Church, VA; www.creativecauldron.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 17 – SUNDAY, JUNE 10

Girlfriend
Set in a small Nebraska town in 1993, Girlfriend tells the tender, coming-of-age tale of college-bound jock Mike and self-assured but aimless Will, who are high on the rush of a first-time love filled with excitement, confusion and passion. All of these emotions and more are perfectly captured by Matthew Sweet’s alt-rock album, Girlfriend, which inspired the musical. Rolling Stone describes the play as a “rock ‘n’ roll Valentine that delivers subtle wisdom with an exhilarating kick.” Pride nights on May 11 and 18. Tickets start at $40. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 – SUNDAY, MAY 20

The Crucible
Arthur Miller’s classic 1953 play about the Salem witch trials comes to life on Olney Theater’s stage this spring. Enter the world of Salem, Massachusetts in 1692, when an unseen evil swept through the small town of God-fearing people. This is a timeless reminder of the terrible outcomes that stem from bending the truth to conveniently fit one’s political agenda. Tickets start at $59. Olney Theater Center: 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd. Olney, MD; www.olneytheatre.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 – SUNDAY, APRIL 29

International Film Festival
The 32nd annual International Film Festival has been expanding minds and opening eyes for the last three decades, and it’s not about to stop now. Choose from 80 films from over 45 countries over the course of 11 days at various locations throughout the city. Featured films include opening night’s Streake, about a different kind of sports star, and closing night’s Just to Be Sure, a comedy exploring the virtues and vagaries of DNA. Full schedule and ticket information available at www.filmfestdc.org.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 – SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Another F*cking Warhol Production
The feath3r theory, a dance-theatre-media company based in New York City, is coming to the District with Another F*cking Warhol Production. This American docufiction, post-ballet theatre musical is a recreation of the unrecorded, deleted and lost footage from Saturday Night Live’s 2015 episode on love and war (“The Love Episode”). With dancers wearing brightly colored morph suits inspired by 60s fashion, this musical is just the right amount of quirky and compelling. Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15-$30. Dance Place: 3225 8th St. NE, DC; www.danceplace.org

Cecily

Music Picks: April 2018

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4

Ana Moura
With stunning vocals, Ana Moura has been a fixture in the Portuguese music scene since 2003, including collaborations with Prince and The Rolling Stones. It’s no wonder legends have picked up on her undeniable talent because whether the lyrics are delivered in English or Portuguese, the aptitude of Moura’s singing ability is truly stunning. In the backdrop are wondrous strings and a steady rhythm section all built to amplify this talented singer-songwriter’s music prowess. Show at 8 p.m. $50-$60. The Barns at Wolf Trap: 1635 Trap Rd. Vienna, VA;
www.wolftrap.org

Ought
Hailing from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Ought is set to give DC some solid jamming music. Featuring songs that care little for your shrinking attention span, the band often features subtle rock tracks lasting anywhere from four to seven minutes on average. They’ll toss some quick hitters in every now and then, but the often slow developing songs are intoxicating as they draw you in and string you out, providing an emotional slowburn. Doors at 7:30 p.m. $15-$17. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 5 – SUNDAY, APRIL 8

Damaged City Fest
Celebrate hardcore punk from all over the world in DC’s sixth annual Damaged City Fest. This year’s featured bands are Limp Wrist, Turnstile, Radioactivity, The Flex & Arms Race from the UK, RIXE from France, Blazing Eye from California and a rare appearance by New York’s Brown Sugar. Check out the rest of the lineup on Damaged City Fest’s website to plan out your weekend full of thrashing and rocking out. Friday doors open at 6 p.m. Friday aftershow at 11:30 p.m. Saturday doors open at 3 p.m. Saturday aftershow at 11:30 p.m. Sunday doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 6

Cub Sport
Sonically, Cub Sport isn’t too much different than fellow Australians Tame Impala. Though the vocal notes aren’t as high, and the music is a little more on the subtle side, Cub Sport also operates firmly with the intention to make easy-listening pop music. With soothing lyrics and a strong use of diverse synths, Cub Sport provides a sensual sound to listeners worldwide. Though pop music can sometimes make you feel empty inside, this group definitely strives for meaningful sentiment, so give them a listen. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. $13-$15. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

The Weather Station
As leader of The Weather Station, Toronto songwriter Tamara Lindeman brings artistic generosity and joy to her latest self-titled and self-produced album, The Weather Station. Even though she says she wanted to make a rock ‘n’ roll record, the result was closer to a sonic experimentation that touches on feminist politics through detailed prose-poem narratives. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E. Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 8

Mountain Heart
Mountain Heart is the band that has been fearlessly revolutionizing the way acoustic music can be presented and played. The band’s name has been synonymous with cutting-edge excellence in acoustic music circles since the group’s creation. Widely known throughout the music industry for continually redefining the boundaries of acoustic music, the band has gained legions of loyal fans both as a result of their superlative musicianship and just as notably, their incendiary live performances. Show at 7:30 p.m. $18-$20. Write-up provided by venue. Gypsy Sally’s: 3401 K St. NW, DC; www.gypsysallys.com

Run River North
From whimsical silliness to acoustic melodrama, Run River North is what you’d call a pretty dynamic band. That doesn’t mean they have a character-defining sound, it just means that their range is noticeable. A lot of indie acts have a tendency to hammer away at your eardrums with similar sounds, whereas Run River North has more of a flow to their work, kind of like a river, which I realize is corny, but hey, I’m going to roll with it. Union Stage continues getting diverse bands, huh? Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

MONDAY, APRIL 9

Current Swell
With their 2017 release, When to Talk and When to Listen, Current Swell is making waves in the indie rock scene. This Canadian band has gained steady popularity since its inception in 2005, and now they’re touring their best album yet to bring a nice variety of moods and tempos to their fans everywhere. Current Swell is making a stop at Jammin Java, so make sure to buy your tickets now before they sell out. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E. Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com

MONDAY, APRIL 9 – SUNDAY, APRIL 15

SHIFT 2018
SHIFT, a festival of American Orchestras, returns to The Kennedy Center this spring. With performances by Fort Worth Symphony, Albany Symphony, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra and more, this weeklong event celebrates the extraordinary artistry of orchestral musicians. SHIFT also confronts common misconceptions about orchestras and proves why orchestras are so important to artistic expression and development. Various dates and times. Tickets are $25 for each show. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11

Amoramora
With more than 100 shows in 70 different cities in 2017, up-and-coming Amoramora is more than ready to play an awesome show at Gypsy Sally’s. Their jazz fusion, psychedelic bluegrass sound is so groovy, you’ll want to jump out of your seat and dance along. 21+ only. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets $10 advance, $12 day of. Gypsy Sally’s: 3401 K St. NW, DC; www.gypsysallys.com

Pale Waves
Formed in Manchester in 2014, Pale Waves is quintessential to the indie-pop scene in the UK. Just take it from a person who tried to see them at SXSW, but was instead relegated to stand in a blocked off street in order to peak into the club they were performing at. No, I wouldn’t say that is the best way to see them, because standing on the street in the cold is somehow worse than actually sweating in a crowded venue. Anyways, when you hear the words “indie pop” I’m sure some kind of music you’ve heard from the genre plays in your head, so imagine that, only better. Also, I have a ton of respect for any band that opts for a literally blank black canvas as single art. Minimalism is the way to go in today’s society, no? Show at 7 p.m. $15. U St. Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 13

Perpetual Groove
Hailing from Athens, Georgia, Perpetual Groove has cultivated a long list of touring experience and a dedicated fan base since forming in 1997. Perpetual Groove pairs fan-described anthemic arena rock with an intense, retina-burning light show to bring down the house with an all-encompassing performance. After a two-year hiatus, Perpetual Groove is back and ready to rock. Doors open at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Pimps of Joytime
Anyone familiar with the Pimps of Joytime live experience knows the feeling: it’s that moment when a deep bluesy groove morphs into a full-on EDM dance beat, or the sensation when the wide-eyed audience collectively elevates in sync with the band’s tangible energy. Just as Brooklyn has changed since the Pimps started, so has the band’s sound. But as Williamsburg gentrifies, the Pimps of Joytime’s diverse evolution keeps the neighborhood’s spirit alive. That spirit goes into the Pimps’ pot, over a soulful roux of rhythm and groove. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 9 p.m. $15-$20. Write-up provided by venue. Gypsy Sally’s: 3401 K St. NW, DC; www.gypsysallys.com

Titus Andronicus
With their March 2 release of A Productive Cough, Titus Andronicus sets aside heavy punk anthems of the past to focus more on soul-bearing songwriting by creating a conversational space between artist and listener. Singer-songwriter Patrick Stickles says he’s looking forward to communicating more effectively with his audience now that he’s not so busy yelling at them. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

Dead Horses
At the young age of 15, Dead Horses frontwoman Sarah Vos and her family lost everything when they were expelled from the rural Wisconsin church where her father served as a pastor. From that experience, Vos created Dead Horses’ 2016 album, My Mother the Moon, which blends traditional and indie folk while examining the journey of self-discovery. Named as one of 10 new country artists you need to know by Rolling Stone, this is one show you don’t want to miss. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12-$14. Songbyrd Record Cafe and Music House: 2477 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

Maya Jane Coles
DJ Maya Jane Coles has collected millions of hits on YouTube, Spotify and Soundcloud for her house dub music that she mixes, produces and creates herself, which isn’t as common as you’d think. Her talent has taken her to performances in more than 40 countries, and has brought her multiple awards and features in major publications like Rolling Stone. Make it out to U Street tonight for some great beats and an incredibly fun show. 18+ only. Doors open at 10 p.m. Tickets are $20 advance, $25 at the door. No photo/video allowed. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15

U.S. Girls
This year marks the 10th anniversary of U.S. Girls and founder Meg Remy’s first four-track recordings of self-produced and spontaneous expressions of instant emotion. After a decade of honing her craft, Remy still hasn’t lost that raw emotion that permeates her first few recordings. U.S. Girls is a display of unmistakable feminine energy from the experience of an American woman. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $13-$15. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

MONDAY, APRIL 16

Nap Eyes
With a twang reminiscent of Bob Dylan, the laid back rock of Nap Eyes is enough to mellow you out, but not enough to put you asleep. Featuring simple licks and classic rock and roll sound, the lyrics take you on a star-crazed journey through the universe before bringing you back down to earth with universal topics such as depression, insomnia and bad-for-you habits. Sound too heavy? Well, it is, but on the other hand the songs are highly digestible and rather enjoyable. Don’t believe us, well, wake up from your nap and see for yourself. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. $12. DC9 Nightclub: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

TUESDAY, APRIL 17

Eric B. & Rakim
Relive the late 80s and early 90s at The Fillmore with Eric B & Rakim, a legendary hip-hop duo hailing from Long Island. Of Erik B & Rakim, AllMusic wrote “during rap’s so-called golden age in the late ‘80s, Eric B. & Rakim were almost universally recognized as the premier DJ/MC team in all of hip-hop.” In 2016 they announced their reunion for a 2017 tour after a 23-year hiatus, and they’re touring again this spring with 17 dates in the states. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $45. The Fillmore: 8656 Colesville Rd. Silver Spring, MD; www.fillmoresilverspring.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18

RZA
If you know anything about RZA, you know about his affinity for retro Chinese martial arts films. From his samples as lead producer and founder of the Wu-Tang Clan and his directing of The Man With the Iron Fists, the rapper, producer, director, etc. always keeps popping out homages to this classic genre. Now, you’ll get to see him tinker with his adoration live, as he rescores the classic The 36th Chamber of Shaolin. The special screening will be filled with instrumentals, beats and effects staight from RZA’s vast collection of sounds. It’s rare we get access to an artist actively toying with his muse, so don’t miss this chance to see one of the most creative music pioneers. Doors at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m. $36-$45. Warner Theatre: 513 13th St. NW, DC; www.warnertheatredc.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

Black Star
You should know who Black Star is. In fact if you don’t, maybe this show isn’t for you, because this duo’s contributions to political hip-hop are literally second to none. Made up of rap stalwarts Talib Kweli and Yasiin Bey (formerly Mos Def), the NYC legends are two guys that have historically aged like fine wine. Though their status in the popular culture may be slightly forgotten by the genre’s neophytes, people who are willing to dig into any sort of rap history will discover a colorful discography chalk full of profound lyrics built to change society for the better. Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. $45-$75. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

Wild Ones
The neatest aspect of Wild Ones might be the simple fact that their entire sound is DIY. The Portland, Oregon product has been together for seven years and combines a uniquely soothing voice, provided by Danielle Sullivan, with a pace that mimics soothing R&B music, but sonically uses synths to provide a little more energy. Don’t be swayed by the group’s carefree appearance, as the subtext of their lyrics often touches on the perils of romance or the difficulty of being involved in the constantly evolving music business. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. $12-$14. Songbyrd Record Cafe and Music House: 2477 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

Slushii
L.A. DJ and dubstep artist Slushii is bringing his futuristic bass and trap sound to Echostage. With an album release in 2017 and a trajectory of success that only seems to keep rising, Slushii is perfecting his craft of beat creation to bring out the bass god in us all. Collaborations in the past year with fellow dubstep artist Marshmello have really brought out Slushii’s musical prowess. 18+ only. Doors open 9 p.m. Tickets are $25-$30. Echostage: 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE, DC; www.echostage.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

Fatai
This one is soulful. Fatai, an Australian vocalist, has some seriously powerful windpipes as she repeatedly delves deep to produce breathtaking music built on the foundation of her enchanting singing. Because of her location, seeing this artist in North America can prove difficult, and according to her website, she has routinely sold out her stateside appearances. If you’re in the mood for sultry music with gravity and strength, consider seeing Fatai in Vienna. Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. $13-$15. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E. Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 24

Cecily
The DMV’s own Cecily is live at the Anacostia Arts Center fresh off of her latest single release “Pisces,” which sees the talented musician deftly navigate her jazz, soul and R&B influences, creating a medley of sounds. Whether she’s collaborating with a local emcee or standing center stage with the sass of a bonafide super star, Cecily is certainly a local talent you want to catch before she steadily rises through the music scene. Nothing beats an intimate setting with her unique blend of passion and performance. Doors at 7 p.m. Free to attend. Anacostia Arts Center: 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE, DC; www.anacostiaartscenter.com

Preoccupations
These guys are moody. I don’t mean that in necessarily a bad way, but they certainly wear their hearts on their sleeves, if you get my drift. From song titles like “Disarray,” “Anxiety” and “Doubt,” there isn’t much subtlety to their message. This doesn’t stop the songs donning these serious monikers from carrying vignettes of joy, but it does make you listen more carefully for words of wisdom or even relatable scenarios. In a way, the band makes efforts to transfer these feelings into tangible audio, and they do a pretty good job mimicking “Anxiety.” Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. $15-$18. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

The Heavy Pets
This funky rock ‘n’ roll band from South Florida was dubbed “a living, breathing force of nature” by Relix Magazine for their expert song crafting and their powerhouse live performances. As regulars on the national touring circuit for over a decade, The Heavy Pets is a group of well-trained and seasoned musicians who weave elements of indie, funk and reggae into a tapestry of sound that’s all their own. 21+ only. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Pearl Street Warehouse: 33 Pearl St. SW, DC; www.pearlstreetwarehouse.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 26

Hawthorne Heights
Feel like reliving your emo days? Come out to the Rock & Roll Hotel to see a performance by Hawthorne Heights, the premiere emo rock band of the 2000s. Bad Frequencies, their first full-length album release since 2013, is set to drop on April 27, so if you’re lucky, they might preview some of their new songs on stage tonight. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 27

Twin Shadow
When I first heard “Five Seconds To Your Heart,” I thought it was a song from a bygone era (*coughs the 80s) I just missed when jumping around those Spotify curated “TOP 80s SONGS” playlists. Instead, it came from Dominican Republic born, Brooklyn bred George Lewis Jr., otherwise known as Twin Shadow. With synths and other electric sounds, the music channels this yesteryear genre, however, Lewis Jr. is able to make the sound his own, and very contemporary, often collaborating with other artists who are interested in pop music from the same era, like HAIM. So even though the drum beats and melodies sound as if they burst from a time machine, know this shadow is firmly a product from an artist of today. Show at 7 p.m. $30. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 29

Minus The Bear
To celebrate 10 years of writing and performing their unique music, Minus The Bear is traveling coast to coast on their Planet of Ice Anniversary Tour. With a sound that could only be described as uniquely patched together, Minus The Bear has carved out their place in the music industry by collecting different components from New York proto-punk, progressive rock, hip-hop and IDM, thus avoiding any type of classification whatsoever. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 advance, $30 at the door. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com