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Photo: courtesy of Bold Rock

Bold Rock Embraces Pumpkin Season With Fall’s Harvest Haze

Pumpkin season has creeped closer and closer toward summer ever since Starbucks unveiled its Pumpkin Spice Latte way back in 2003. Since, the ultimate coffee combo has sparked a renaissance of culinary experimentation featuring the orange veggie with products ranging from coffee (duh) and pastries to this year’s Pumpkin Spice Spam (what now?) While a hint of the squash plant in a latte was a can’t-miss, the flavor’s foray into salted meats seems like a leap – but people just can’t seem to get enough, so why not? At least that’s Bold Rock’s approach.

“It’s always been a request from the customers,” says Lindsay Dorrier, Bold Rock Hard Cider’s director of new business development. “We tried to skew in the opposite direction because pumpkin was an obvious choice, [but] we finally caved because the customers wanted it so badly.”

This is likely music to the ears of cider aficionados who double as pumpkin enthusiasts. Yes, the Nellysford, Virginia-based cidery is following the unshakeable trend of tossing out a pumpkin product with its 2019 fall seasonal Harvest Haze. But Dorrier says the flavor will still be distinctly Bold Rock as the cidery took heavy precautions against simply pumping out something they knew could sell.

So while the cider is unlike the brand’s typically crystal-clear beverages – with floating bits and pieces of our favorite orange edible providing a unique texture – apples are still front and center and prevalent throughout.

“We wanted to craft a pumpkin-infused cider that was still a quintessential Bold Rock cider,” he says. “It’s still an apple cider. It’s just got a hint of pumpkin. We really tried to capture a flavor profile [for] the entire fall harvest.”

Dorrier says the team prepped for the fall season’s newest addition for about eight months, adding that the cidery was still tinkering with what would become the final product at the 11th hour. While the bottle features an orange logo, it’s clear the team didn’t take the path of least resistance by simply dialing up pumpkin flavors. Instead, the cider makers sought to capture the entire palate of the fall season.

“We wanted to create something that we could toast to the entire fall harvest,” he says. “Pumpkin is an important [part] of the flavor profile, but not the entire part. [For] any seasonal variance we use, all the alcohol comes from apples, but we want it to shine through as well. We add in a jolt of excitement depending on what we want to do with the flavor.”

While most fall pumpkin-infused products veer on the sweet side, including other ciders, Bold Rock was weary of overdoing it with Harvest Haze. While they ultimately want to nail it with cider drinkers who championed this special varietal, Bold Rock didn’t want to produce a cider that couldn’t be enjoyed by people who aren’t as cavalier about pumpkin consumption.

“We try to bridge that gap between pumpkin-crazed and the people fatigued,” he says. “We wanted something that could appeal to both. We wanted some nuance in that profile. We didn’t want the drink to live and die [with] that pumpkin preference. If you crave the dry, we have it covered. If you want something fruit-forward, we have that, too. We’re just trying to explore all corners of the palate.”

With apples hailing from Virginia and pumpkins sourced from the Pacific Northwest, the cider hits all marks for both the cider crazed and those enthusiastic drinkers looking for anything featuring the season’s most versatile vegetable.

Bold Rock Hard Cider’s Harvest Haze hits shelves in October and will be available throughout Northern Virginia and DC. For more information about the seasonal release and other Bold Rock varietals, visit www.boldrock.com.

Founder Tristan Wright // Photo: Misha Enriquez for Visit Alexandria

Lost Boy Cider Plants Itself in Alexandria

When former banker Tristan Wright was diagnosed with a severe soy allergy a few years ago, he realized he wanted to make some changes in his life.

“I had spent 16 years in the industry,” he says. “And one day when looking in the mirror, I realized I was doing something that I didn’t love and wasn’t passionate about any longer. A lot of that had to do with that diagnosis. As you get older, you begin to hear that ticking clock and think more about your mortality. I didn’t want to wake up in a hospital room one day and not be able to say I had done something in life that was worth the risk.”

Wright had recently started drinking cider because he needed to give up whiskey and beer. He researched what was out there, and couldn’t find too many ciders that he wanted to drink. Like kismet, he was sitting on the couch one day watching a ballgame when a commercial for Angry Orchard cider came on, and he had a light bulb moment.

“It was almost like someone was telling me I should start a cider company. I was looking for something to do, and here was an opportunity to do something really cool.”

A month later, he found himself at Widmer Brothers Brewery in Portland, Oregon sitting in a cider production class led by cider professionals from the Pacific Northwest.

“I immediately connected with those in the room and spent a couple of weeks out there going through 19 different cideries,” he says. “From there, I enrolled in Cornell’s viticulture and enology [the study of grape cultivation and the study of wines, respectively] program, studying yeast cultures they use in wine and the science behind the craft.”

His business plan was finally on its way. On June 8, Wright opened Lost Boy Cider – the first cidery in Northern Virginia – in Alexandria’s Carlyle neighborhood. His cidery produces a variety of traditional and innovative hard ciders, with almost 100 percent of their sourced apples grown in Virginia.

“Our ciders are all bone-dry with no residual sugars. They are in the 6.9 percent range. Our belief is you can go and source very good apples, hand ferment them and introduce dry cider the way it should be.”

For now, the cider is coming from trees on Glaize Apples’ properties in the Shenandoah Valley. The process involves Lost Boy fermenting the squeezed apple juice and then crafting the liquid into one of the cidery’s signature ciders. The menu features Bottle Rocket, made with jalapeños; Spicoli, made with pineapple; and Slasher, made with raspberries.

Lost Boy Cider has an apple orchard onsite adjacent to its tasting room with semi-Dwarf Golden Delicious varieties from Stark Bro’s, a Mississippi Delta-based company. Once fully grown to roughly nine feet, the apple trees will produce nearly 80 gallons of juice. The first harvest is planned for fall of 2020.

“We are licensed in the state as a farm winery and you cannot do that in the state without controlling land where 65 percent of your product comes from,” Wright explains. “You must control an orchard in continuous or adjacent space to where your tasting room operates from.”
Lost Boy Cider will also receive a $60,000 Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development (AFID) program grant.

“We’re incredibly grateful for it, and we’ll use that money to build out and deepen our laboratory area so we can continue to understand what type of ciders we are making. The money comes in waves and it requires me to utilize Virginia resources, which we planned on doing anyway. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

The theme of the Lost Boy logo is to motivate people to explore the opportunities they are presented with.

“It’s not about being lost, but really about being found.”

Lost Boy’s instant popularity at the grand opening last month proved to Wright this is a place people wanted to see.

“I knew our cider was good and we worked very, very hard on it, but I had no idea that the community would support us in the way that they did. I opened the doors at noon and by 12:04, we had exceeded our occupancy load. There was a line of 80 people outside and throughout the day, people were waiting up to 45 minutes in line to get in.”

About 1,400 people came through the doors by day’s end, and cider was flying off the shelves.

“It was just incredible and we’re looking forward to more. It feels really good to know the hard work we have put in the last couple of years is hopefully going to pay off.”

Lost Boy Cider: 317 Hooffs Run Dr. Alexandria, VA; 703-868-4865; www.lostboycider.com

Photo: Daniel Lempres

What’s On Tap: ANXO cidery & PintXos Bar’s Rachel Fitz Celebrates Women in Food and Drink

When ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar opened in Truxton Circle, they were the only sit-down restaurant in the neighborhood. Co-owner Rachel Fitz says the grid couldn’t handle a business of ANXO’s size – her team had to increase power and water for the entire neighborhood – but it was important for them to operate in the District and support the local community. A former social worker, Fitz’s commitment to community engagement has translated to her role at ANXO. After the resounding success of the cidery’s collaboration with Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington on International Women’s Day last year, Fitz decided to extend and expand ANXO’s celebration of women. For Women’s Month 2019, ANXO is featuring women in the industry throughout March at special events, and everything poured at the cidery is provided by women-owned or women-run breweries. Plus, happy hour profits for the entire month are going to DC’s Planned Parenthood office.

On Tap: Tell me about your introduction to cider, and your path to opening ANXO.
Rachel Fitz:
My business partners and I traveled around Spain and fell in love with cider. I thought, “Who knew there was all this cider in the world that’s not sweet and is interesting?” We all come from a beer background and really fell in love with cider. The idea when we opened was to start as a cider bar and do a small amount of production, mostly what comes out of the barrel downstairs – that’s our sidra. [Cider] is the original beverage of the United States. We’re really just getting back to our roots, no pun intended.

OT: What exactly did ANXO do last year for International Women’s Day?
RF:
We decided to highlight female producers. We thought it was going to be a small-scale fundraiser [for Planned Parenthood], but we were blown away by the positive support from attendees and those featured. We had no idea these companies had women running or owning them. It got us thinking about how many other women there are doing amazing things, and how women are rarely in the spotlight.

OT: What inspired the longer celebration this year?
RF:
[Last year] was a huge success. We raised over $2,600 in one night and wanted to grow it, so we decided, “Why not do an entire month of celebrating?” We decided to pour only products made or owned by women. With 36 draft lines, plus liquor, wine and nonalcoholic beverages, we went into it thinking it would be challenging. Turns out, there are a ton of female producers. Every day, we come across new options.

OT: Are you doing collaborations with other brewers as well?
RF:
We did two collaborations: a brut IPA with Denizens and a cider with Eden out of Vermont called Nevertheless We Persisted. [The cider] will be released on International Women’s Day. This is the first year of doing a month-long collaboration, and we hope to do it again next year and get other places doing this. It would be great if in the District, everybody was highlighting amazing women in the industry.

OT: Why do you think it’s important to not only highlight women in the industry, but also create a space for them to connect?
RF:
I think a lot of the time there is not a comfortable space to ask questions that would really help you as a young professional. It’s hard to go up to somebody who is very established in the industry and say, “I want to make more money” or ask, “How do I get to where you are?” I wanted to create an environment where people are comfortable [doing] that, and to learn from people who have already been through that.

OT: What would you say to women interested in the cider industry who worry it’s a boys’ club?

RF: Tom Oliver, a famous U.K. cidermaker, says he firmly believes that women are going to be the future of cider. A lot of people think cider is a female beverage – it’s certainly not. But women have a lot of say in the market: in the products that are being produced, in the way that they’re presented. Women have a very powerful voice, and it’s great to see women who are growing trees, orcharding and also making cider. There are no limitations.

ANXO is exclusively pouring products from women-owned or operated breweries and distilleries for the entire month of March at their Truxton Circle location. Specifics on their other Women’s Month events are available at www.anxodc.com/womensmonth

ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; 202-986-3795; www.anxodc.com


Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

SUNDAY, MARCH 4

Women’s Month Collaboration Dinner
A group of female chefs will be taking over ANXO’s kitchen including award-winning women like Ilma Lopez, Cagla Onal and Amy Morgan. The four-course menu will be paired with ciders and wines made by women in the industry. 7 p.m. Tickets $97.50. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 7

Beer & Donuts
With three taps, board games and donuts, Arlington’s Sugar Shack is the place to be on Thursday nights. Taps will pour the latest offerings from Right Proper Brewing Company; tap takeover nights always feature local craft brewers, donuts and a variety of board games. 4-9 p.m. Admission is free. Sugar Shack Donuts & Coffee: 1014 South Glebe Rd. Arlington, VA; www.sugarshackdonuts.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 8

ANXO’s International Women’s Day Celebration
For the entire month of March, ANXO will donate happy hour profits to the local Planned Parenthood. On Women’s Day, Elanor Leger of Eden Specialty Ciders will be at ANXO, women’s month T-shirts will be available and ANXO’s newest collaboration with Eden will be available in cans. 5 p.m. Admission is free. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

Cheers & Namaste
There’s no better way to spend a Saturday morning than enjoying a flight of local beer and doing some yoga. Classes at Right Proper’s Brookland location include a flight of house favorites and an hour of yoga suitable for any experience level. Don’t forget your mat. 12-1 p.m. Tickets $15.  Right Proper Brewing Company Production House and Tasting Room: 920 Girard St. NE, DC; www.rightproperbrewing.com

DC Brewers’ Guild HopFest
The DC Brewers’ Guild is throwing its ninth annual HopFest hosted by DC Brau. The event is an opportunity to sample some of the hoppiest brews from the area’s best brewers. Beer offerings will include community favorites alongside unique HopFest creations and rare brews. Tickets include a special DC Brewers’ Guild glass and unlimited pours. 1-5 p.m. Tickets start at $35. DC Brau: 3178 Bladensburg Rd. NE, DC; www.dcbg.org

SUNDAY, MARCH 10

Records, Beer and BBQ
The only thing better than crate-digging is doing so with a fresh pint in hand. Join Hellbender Brewing for a record swap/sale in the tasting room featuring barbecue courtesy of Smoke and Ember BBQ. 12-5 p.m. Admission is free. Hellbender Brewing Company Tasting Room: 5788 2nd St. NE, DC; www.hellbenderbeer.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13

De Dolle Vintage Flight Night
De Dolle’s Belgian strong ales are world-renowned for their bold flavors. Many of De Dolle’s offerings age exceptionally well and thrive when barreled, though the brewery is also known for blending maltiness and acidity in its pale ales and sours. The Sovereign will offer 15 different De Dolle beers and four different vintage flights. 5-11:30 p.m. Admission is free. The Sovereign DC: 1206 Wisconsin Ave. NW, DC; www.thesovereigndc.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20

D&V International Beer Dinner
Enjoy fine dining and European beer pairings in the style of the Trappist monks of Belgium. Learn about featured breweries from a Belgian beer expert and taste a variety of beers in the style, many imported specifically for this event, after dinner. 7-10 p.m. Tickets $60. Granville Moore’s: 1238 H St. NE, DC; www.granvillemoores.com    

Visiting Cidery: Wild Hare Ciders
Brewed in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains with heritage apples grown in the Shenandoah Valley, Wild Hare Cidery excels at apple-only as well as botanical and other fruit-infused ciders. Tickets include a guided tasting of several Wild Hare offerings including limited releases. 7-10 p.m. Tickets $10. Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 21

Southwest Neighborhood Happy Hour
The tap room at Union Stage invites locals to enjoy happy hour specials and mingle with other folks from the neighborhood. Union Stage features an extensive liquor list, 16 taps and house-made pizzas. 5 p.m. Admission is free. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 23

Peche Mortel Day
Shipped from Montreal’s Dieu Du Ciel brewpub, Peche Mortel is a standout imperial coffee stout known the world over. To celebrate their 2019 releases, Dieu Du Ciel shares special variants of its famous stout with brewpubs all around the world, including ChurchKey. This year’s offerings include seven variants of the imperial stout, some of which are aged in bourbon or whiskey barrels and finished with an array of ingredients including cherries, coffee and toasted coconut. 12 p.m. Admission is free. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 30

ANXO’s Women’s Month Close-Out Party
Join ANXO in celebrating the end of a successful Women’s Month. The closeout is a comedy brunch, marking the first time a comedian has performed in ANXO’s dining room. Tickets are available both with and without drink pairings. Showings at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tickets $40-$65. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

Spring BrewFest
BrewFest promises a day of craft beer, live music, food and more. The event will feature a variety of popular local craft beers, as well as a preview of local 2019 offerings. Virginia wineries and distilleries will also be pouring. 11-5 p.m. Tickets $10-$50. Fredericksburg Fairgrounds: 2400 Airport Ave. Fredericksburg, VA; www.fredbrewfest.com

Celebrating Cider: On Tap’s Guide to Local Cideries

Autumn is just around the corner, and if you’re like us, your taste buds are ready for all things fall: pumpkin spice, cinnamon and apple-flavored everything. If you’re ready to trade in your wheat and fruit beers for something a little more seasonal, try a hard cider from one of the numerous cideries scattered around the DMV (or just a day trip away) in our 2018 Cider Guide. With Virginia growing some of the best apples in the country, you can’t go wrong. From the classic Virginia countryside views at Coyote Hole Ciderworks to the farmhouse-style cider at Willow Oaks Craft Cider, there’s something for everyone.


Albemarle CiderWorks: 2545 Rural Ridge Ln. North Garden, VA; www.albemarleciderworks.com

ANXO Cidery & Tasting Room: 711 Kennedy St. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

Big Fish Cider Co.: 59 Spruce St. Monterey, VA; www.bigfishcider.com

Blue Bee Cider: 1320 Summit Ave. Richmond, VA; www.bluebeecider.com

Blue Toad Hard Cider: 462 Winery Ln. Roseland, VA; www.bluetoadhardcider.com

Bold Rock Hard Cider: 1020 Rockfish Valley Hwy. Nellysford, VA; www.boldrock.com

Bryant’s Cider: 3224 East Branch Loop, Roseland, VA; www.bryantscider.com

Buskey Cider: 2910 W. Leigh St. Richmond, VA; www.buskeycider.com


Castle Hill

Castle Hill Cider
6065 Turkey Sag Rd. Keswick, VA
434-296-0047 | www.castlehillcider.com

Castle Hill Cider blends time-honored traditions with modern techniques to bring you refreshing and award-winning Virginia cider. Their world-class cider makers use time-tested and cutting-edge practices, working to renovate an 80-year-old orchard while collaborating with growers of prime apple varieties. Visit them at their tasting room, open every day of the week from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Winter hours (January to March) are 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Thursday to Monday.


Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

Cobbler Mountain Cider: 5909 Long Fall Ln. Delaplane, VA; www.cobblermountain.com

Corcoran Vineyards & Cider: 14635 Corkys Farm Ln. Waterford, VA; www.corcorancider.com

Courthouse Creek Cider: 1581 Maidens Rd. Maidens, VA; www.courthousecreek.com

Distillery Lane Ciderworks: 5533 Gapland Rd. Jefferson, MD; www.distillerylaneciderworks.com

Fabbioli Cellars: 15669 Limestone School Rd. Leesburg, VA; www.fabbioliwines.com

Faulkner Branch Cidery & Distillery Co.: 4822 Preston Rd. Federalsburg, MD; www.faulknerbranch.com

Foggy Ridge Cider: 1328 Pine View Rd. Dugspur, VA; www.foggyridgecider.com

Great Shoals Winery: 7050 Carroll Ave. Takoma Park, MD; www.greatshoalstakoma.com


Coyote Hole

Coyote Hole Ciderworks
225 Oak Grove Dr. Lake Anna, VA
540-894-1053 | www.coyotehole.com

Find Coyote Hole Ciderworks in the heart of Virginia at Lake Anna on 37 beautiful acres. Their hard ciders are produced with 100 percent Virginia apples and pears, gluten-free and never made from concentrate. Ranging in sweetness levels from dry to sweet with a minimum of 6.5 percent ABV, their ciders rise above the pack and are true Virginia craft ciders. They encourage a friendly and relaxing atmosphere at their tasting room where you can enjoy their flagship ciders, Oma Smith’s, Opa Smith’s and HPA (Hopped Pressed Apple), along with a variety of seasonal ciders.


Mt. Defiance Cidery & Distillery: 495 E. Washington St. Middleburg, VA; www.mtdefiance.com

Old Hill Cider: 17768 Honeyville Rd. Timberville, VA; www.oldhillcider.com

Old Trade Brewery & Cidery: 13270 Alanthus Rd. Brandy Station, VA; www.oldtradebrewery.com

Potter’s Craft Cider: 4699 Catterton Rd. Free Union, VA; www.potterscraftcider.com

Red Shedman Farm Brewery: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, VA; www.redshedman.com

Supreme Core Cider: 2400 T St. NE, DC; www.supremecorecider.com

Wild Hare Hard Cider: 106A South St. SE, Leesburg, VA; www.wildharecider.com

Winchester Ciderworks: 2504 N. Frederick Pk. Winchester, VA; www.winchesterciderworks.com

The Winery at Kindred Pointe: 3575 Conicville Rd. Mt. Jackson, VA; www.kindredpointe.com


Willow Oaks

Willow Oaks Craft Cider
6219 Harley Rd. Middletown, MD
301-371-4814 | www.willowoakscraftcider.com

Willow Oaks crafts their farmhouse-style cider from certified organic, American heirloom apples on their 35-acre farm. But they also use organic pears, blueberries, black currants and other fruits to make tasty additions to Willow Oaks’ ciders. Fabulous fruit, unique terroir and small-batch barrel fermentation let the flavors and aroma of the fruit shine through for a crisp, dry finish. While you sip on some cider, visit the Willow Oaks barn tasting room, farm stand and art gallery. Their tasting room is open April to December on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., and January to March by appointment.

Photo: Mark Williams Hoelscher, @mwhphoto

Capitol Cider House Brings Local Flavor to the District’s Burgeoning Cider Scene

A revisiting of Mid-Atlantic roots, Capitol Cider House’s local influence can be felt at every touch point, from the product it sources to the design aesthetic in the Georgia Avenue space. The Petworth newcomer opened three months ago and has been a welcome addition to the booming neighborhood.

Speaking of being neighborly, there’s a heavy emphasis on all things local with a commitment to sourcing within a 200-mile radius of the U.S. Capitol Building. The industrial space is outfitted with reclaimed wood pieces and splashes of patriotic red, white and blue – with a back-wall mural executed by DC creatives No Kings Collective. The open layout features community seating with high tops scattered throughout the main space, a smaller private room dubbed the “Brewer’s Table” and an outdoor patio.

Founder Jared Fackrell first started experimenting with cider two years ago after a family trip to the Finger Lakes in New York. There, he and his wife found themselves at a cider house where they were struck by the complexity of flavors, crispness and wine-like taste of the ciders they sampled. They returned to DC joking about creating their own cider, prompting Fackrell to purchase a how-to book on cider production.

The jokes materialized into a hobby where, armed with his Amazon Books purchase, prior homebrewing knowledge (he had brewed beer years ago) and self-built equipment, Fackrell set off on a course that would eventually lead to opening Capitol Cider House.

DC’s newest cidery arrives at a time when local and regional cideries are on the rise in popularity and growth. According to the United States Association of Cider Makers, dollar sales of craft cider increased 39 percent in 2016 when compared to 2015 and in the past year, market share grew 30 percent for regional ciders.

As members of a CSA (community supported agriculture), Fackrell and his wife saw the value of reconnecting with food and knowing where produce comes from – a big driver behind his devotion to keeping that local flair for Capitol Cider House. When asked what he thinks is the driving force behind the renewed interest in cider both regionally and nationally, Fackrell notes, “Part of it stems from this reconnection of where your food is coming from. Folks are starting to revalue the taste of something over the appearance.”

The local curiosity of knowing where food products are sourced and how they are made is evident come pressing time at the cidery. Every Monday through Wednesday, the team clears the main space for apple processing: furniture is pushed back, sleeves are rolled up and 3,000 pounds of apples are pressed. Passersbys can get a not so behind-the-scenes look at what goes into this process courtesy of the floor-to-ceiling window storefront. Fackrell notes that many a curious pedestrian has stopped to peer in, press a nose to the glass and take a video, helping to demystify how it all works.

With two cideries already on the DC scene, Capitol Cider House’s approach is distinct from its counterparts. Those with a palate geared toward craft beers will likely be intrigued by Ivy City’s Supreme Core offerings, whereas guests with a penchant for Spanish wines or Basque-style cider will find appealing options at DC’s first cidery, Anxo. In contrast, Capitol Cider House will focus on the barrel-aging process to produce smaller-batch ciders, fortifying them to create an apple, port-like product.

Twelve taps behind the bar feature 10 ciders, including Anxo and Supreme Core, with the remaining two saved for mead and beer. The menu also includes over 30 bottled ciders. Not sure where to start? Opt for a flight of four ciders chosen at the drinker’s discretion or preselected by the cidermaker.

As for food, the cidery partnered up with Union Kitchen alums to bring local, homegrown fare to the table. Guests will find Sri Lankan street food in the form of roti and sambol from Ten Tigers Parlour’s Short Eats pop-up, as well as a slew of Colombian-style empanadas from M’Panadas. Additionally, the food menu includes cheese plates and hot dogs with hamburgers coming soon.

In the next few months, expect another collaboration with Distillery Lane Ciderworks near Frederick, Maryland (Fackrell worked with the distillery to produce his first house cider Quincey, which has since poured its last drop), cold weather cider options (think mulled versions perfect for the impending cooler temperatures) and more house products added to the tap list.

Sunday jazz brunch is a recent endeavor that will likely become a mainstay, a nostalgic nod to Fackrell’s days as an undergrad in New Orleans. Customers can expect more food pop-ups, events with guest bartenders showcasing cider in cocktails and other fun collaborations.

Three months in, the neighborhood’s reception of Capitol Cider House has been warm and welcoming – the bar even has a group of regulars. But Fackrell isn’t ready to slow down yet. With the apple harvest coming up, he’s already thinking ahead and excited about  producing cider and “introducing more of our products under the tap list.”

To those still unsure about the cider craze?

“I would offer that most people who come in here and don’t know anything about cider who are willing to at least try, some of them will walk out with a different impression – the same way that I walked out up in New York.”

Visit Capitol Cider House on Thursday and Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Learn more at www.capitolciderhouse.com and follow the cidery on social media at @capciderhouse.

Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; 202-621-0982; www.capitolciderhouse.com

Photo: Courtesy of Bold Rock

Bold Rock Unveils Spring Seasonal Rosé Cider

Drink aficionados can be a fickle bunch, often resulting in cliques for beer enthusiasts, wine connoisseurs and spirit experts. Stepping outside of your comfort zone can be difficult, but Bold Rock Cider is used to bending norms to introduce folks to the wonders of hard cider. Earlier this year, the cidery released its new rosé hard cider. To get some insight on the latest and greatest beverage of Bold Rock, we talked to head cider maker Ian Niblock about the spring seasonal.

On Tap: How long had you workshopped a rosé cider? Why did you decide to develop this drink?
Ian Niblock: We’ve had our eye on a rosé-style cider for quite some time now. Like how our IPA (India Pressed Apple) is a gateway cider for beer drinkers, we wanted a style that would entice wine drinkers to give us a chance. We hear all the time from beer drinkers that they had no idea cider could taste that good, but they never would have tried it if not for the connectivity to beer. We saw that same opportunity in rosé cider, and we think many wine drinkers are going to be surprised by the great taste of Bold Rock Rosé.

OT: What are some similarities between your rosé hard cider and rosé wine?
IN: What anyone will notice first is the color. Bold Rock Rosé has a deep, rich pink hue immediately recognizable as rosé. Bold Rock Rosé is the driest cider we have ever released in a six-pack, with just enough sweetness to accentuate the strawberry [and] raspberry notes reminiscent of a Gewürztraminer rosé.

OT: Do you think cider drinkers might hesitate to try the cider because of its name?
IN: There has certainly been a need to educate the consumer on what rosé cider is, but rosé is such a popular wine style that there is plenty of awareness out there already. Our version is just a little bit of a twist that only uses apples, but still has a taste profile very similar to that of a rosé wine.

OT: What were your thoughts upon first tasting the cider? Did you guys nail it right away or did it take a while to get the recipe down?
IN: Bold Rock Rosé went through all sorts of trials and iterations, but when you hit the right recipe, you know. We had a moment when we were tasting some trial recipes and we all honed in on one in particular and said, “That’s the one!” It was pretty rewarding.

OT: What has the response been like so far? Do you guys plan to keep it as part of your seasonal rotation?
IN: The response has honestly been tremendous. The sheer amount of excitement surrounding the announcement followed by the subsequent success of Bold Rock Rosé in the marketplace has exceeded all expectations. We feel blessed to have such loyal customers who look forward to our seasonal releases, but the rosé has been embraced by longtime Bold Rockers and new entrants to the cider category alike.

OT: What’s next on the horizon for Bold Rock? Are there any strange or unusual drinks that you’re excited about?
IN: I can’t give away too much, but the rest of the year will not disappoint. As far as “strange and unusual” goes, we recently renovated our original cider barn into the Barrel Barn, which serves as both a small batch crafting facility and intimate tap room. The Barrel Barn will be our test bed of cider innovation, exploring the depths of cider, from yeast experiments to barrel aging and beyond. Guests can look forward to plenty of limited-run cider styles – some in kegs, some in cork and caged bottles. However, you’ll have to make the trek to our Nellysford Cidery to experience those styles as they will only be available at the Barrel Barn for now.

For more information on Bold Rock and where to pick it up locally, visit www.boldrock.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Bold Rock's Facebook page

Bold Rock Releases New Rosé Cider

Good news, folks. We made it through five Mondays in what felt like the longest January known to man. The bad news? We still have to make it through February and March. It may be too cold to dig your spring coat out, but you can pretend warm weather is on the way by kicking back with Bold Rock’s new seasonal rosé cider.

The Nellysford, Virginia-based cidery’s newest seasonal cider is a sweet, refreshing drink in a vibrant shade of pink that made it seem like May for a brief moment as I sipped it. As both a beer and wine drinker, I found the rosé cider to be a unique combination of both. Bold Rock brings the best of both worlds by amplifying their apple-based cider with a fresh wine finish.

While the cider still had Bold Rock’s classic light and crisp quality, its flavors were enhanced with hints of berry – like you would find in a traditional rosé – to bring a fruity quality to the mix. Those who identify as only wine or beer drinkers can find a happy medium in the rosé cider, which easily passes as a fizzy wine or a sweet, fruity beer.

Whatever your drink preference, the rosé cider is worth a taste – and it will definitely make you feel like you’re sitting in the sun alongside friends at a picnic or barbecue, and not 40-degree weather in February. Learn more about Bold Rock’s rosé cider here.