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Photo: courtesy of Washington Mystics

Continuity Fuels Washington Mystics’ Fast Start

After a 3-0 sweep in the 2018 WNBA finals against the Seattle Storm, it would have been easy, perhaps even understandable, for Mystics coach and general manager Mike Thibault to want to shake up the roster. Though the team had reached the last round of the playoffs, they couldn’t so much as take a game off the loaded Storm.

On the other hand, continuity in sports is rare. Traditionally in basketball, teams with the most talent prevail due to the nature of how few people can physically play at a single time. The Mystics aren’t short on talent, but there’s more than just ability on the loaded roster.

The team, off to an 8-3 start since opening play in late May, knows who they are early. The ball is buzzing around the court with tremendous energy, the kind that can’t be bought or manufactured, that can only be earned with trust and understanding.

“When we lost the finals, it was straight back to business,” forward Tianna Hawkins says. “We were hurt and upset that we didn’t win. So coming into training camp, everybody was ready to go in and go to war.”

One early indicator of a team’s togetherness is assists and the Mystics have shown an incredible aptitude for sharing the ball early this season, averaging more than 27 per 100 possessions.

“The chemistry of playing together has a lot to do with it,” Thibault says. “We’ve done a good job with spacing. We penetrate and kick out to shooters. I think the other part of it is if you shoot the ball well, you’re assists go up. It’s all a reflection of the rhythm of the shot and if you make a shot.”

The Mystics are also leading the league in scoring with an absolutely blistering 108.7 points per 100 possessions. Though part of this points binge is a continuity among players with Elena Delle Donne (16.4 ppg) and Kristi Toliver (11.8 ppg) both picking back up as the team’s leading scorers, another explanation for the uptick is the team’s increase in three-point attempts, leading the league with about 33 per 100 possessions.

“And to put more shooters on the floor,” Thibault adds. “We have post players who can all shoot. Sometimes, our post players are our best shooters.”

So far the team has only lost to the Connecticut Sun and the defending champion Storm, as the group has proven beyond any potential hangover from last season’s run. It’s not uncommon for teams who lose the finals to start sluggish the year after, but the Mystics have so far avoided this fate.

“It’s a new season and we’re motivated,” Toliver says. “Usually, when you have the same people coming back, you’re going to click earlier than later. This is the start we should be off to. We’re continuing to learn every day.”

After injuries to the Storm’s Sue Bird and last year’s WNBA MVP Breanna Stewart, some prognosticators picked the Mystics as title favorites. However, the team has so far been immune to any external pressures, adopting a cliché but effective “one game at a time” mantra.

“We know what we’re capable of as a basketball team and we’re taking it one day at a time,” Toliver says. “Everybody in this league can win it. There’s a lot of good teams. Whether people are choosing us or not, we’re not too concerned with it. We had [to believe] in ourselves when people picked us eighth.”

Pegged as preseason favorites, the team is well on its way to capitalizing on its fast start by turning in another strong postseason effort. But the team knows playing well early doesn’t necessarily translate to a championship.

“We know it’s going to be tough to get back to where we were last year,” Hawkins says. “We have a target on our back, but it’s a good feeling to have.”

With a modern style, players who trust one another, and a new home court at the Entertainment and Sports Arena in Congress Heights, the team couldn’t have realistically asked for a better start to the season.

The Mystics return home to play the Phoenix Mercury on Wednesday, July 10. For more information about the team’s current season, visit https://mystics.wnba.com.

Entertainment and Sports Arena: 1100 Oak Dr. SE, DC; https://mystics.wnba.com

Photo: Jennifer Pottheiser / NBAE via Getty Images

Dribbling The District: Mystics’ Kristi Toliver Goes In-Depth On Coaching Wizards

The NBA has included famous females on coaching staffs such as Becky Hammon (San Antonio Spurs), Jenny Boucek (Dallas Mavericks) and now Lindsey Harding (Philadelphia 76ers). Women assistant coaches are slowly gaining residence in men’s sports, including Washington Mystics point guard Kristi Toliver, who is now the first active WNBA player on an NBA coaching staff as an assistant coach for the Washington Wizards.

“I think it’s cool, special and important,” Toliver says. “I’d like to see more options or openings if women want to coach college basketball. Just the idea of them being open to the idea – we should be past that. It’s just about who can do that job the best. It’s good men are finally realizing that women can bring a whole lot to the table, including a new perspective and mentality they haven’t been exposed to before.”

Fresh off the Mystics’ championship loss to the Seattle Storm in the 2018 WNBA finals and hungry for more basketball, Toliver (a former champion herself) spent her summer assisting the Wizards’ coaching staff during summer league and training camp. Toliver was drafted to the WNBA in 2009 by Chicago, enjoyed a stint in Los Angeles and finally joined the Mystics in 2017 during free agency. Continuing her storied basketball journey, her coaching role with the District’s men’s team while active carries great significance.

At first, I didn’t think a whole lot of it because from my perspective, I was just pursuing two things that I’m passionate about and love to do,” she says. 

It wasn’t until head coaches started approaching her and telling her about the impact she was making, especially on their daughters, that it dawned on her this was something big.

“It gave me a new perspective. I’m proud of what I’m doing, but I’m also a person pursuing what I love and that’s the biggest message for other people: there are no limits. I don’t believe in limits. I think you’re capable of anything as long as you’re passionate and care about it and put in the work.”

Toliver’s 10-year career in the WNBA has prepared her for how to handle the highs and lows. Though no one truly gets over a championship loss, Toliver stayed open to learning and growing from the 2018 WNBA finals in the offseason.

“I think that playing overseas and for a championship helps [to get over it], but for me being on the sidelines in an assistant coach position, all I could think about every day was getting back to the finals and wishing we had those three games back against Seattle,” she says. “It’s been my motivation throughout: preparing and getting myself better in different ways because I know you have to be better than you were the year before [to succeed].”

Coaching is something that’s always been in the back of Toliver’s mind – it’s her way of staying in the sport even after her playing career ends.

“Basketball is my passion. I enjoy teaching. I love talking about the game and preparing for games, game planning and other things like that. It kind of just naturally happened and I was presented with a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I wanted to see if I enjoyed it and wanted to get my feet wet.”

Last summer, a familiar face that Toliver knew from her four-year college career at the University of Maryland, Ryan Richman, asked her to be his assistant for the NBA G League Capital City Go-Go. It was a perfect fit for Toliver because she knew she was taking a year off from playing overseas.

However, inside the Wizards organization, assistant coaching positions became available, vaulting Richman to a position at the front of the bench. Toliver was able to talk with head coach Scott Brooks and nab an assistant spot with the Wizards after prepping the team for summer league and joining them in Vegas.

“We had a nice conversation and things just kind of developed from there,” she says. “He asked what I wanted, what my vision was, if I could have anything, what would it be? I went through my checklist and [we] talked through it. Timing is everything; it’s wild how it all turned out.”

During Wizards training camp in September 2018, Toliver was addressed more and more as “Coach,” replacing the normal “Panda,” which is what her Mystics teammates call her.

“It’s funny. All I’ve head for the past eight, nine months was ‘Coach.’ It was different, but I embraced it. [Panda] is the nickname I had from my team in L.A. and here [in DC], we already had a KT on the team, so I just brought Panda over from the West Coast to the East Coast.”

Though she’s known some of the Wizards’ players for a long time, Toliver has embraced the guys on the team and vice versa. She’s been able to learn and gain experience in ways she might not have without this coaching opportunity.

“I don’t know if I’m lucky, but I’ve just been around a great group of guys from top to bottom – guys we still have, guys that were traded away. And [my] relationships with John Wall and Brad Beal, those are two of the guys I’ve been around that my position. All these guys have taught me a whole lot just about the game itself. They’re not only extremely talented in what they do, but also in how they prepare and [in] their leadership qualities – things that I can do better for my team this summer.”

Something new Toliver was charged with as an assistant coach was presenting the scouting report to the team and coaching staff, which turned out to be one of her most memorable moments from the season because it’s a big responsibility.

“That’s what I knew I was going to love the most about coaching – just the preparation aspect and getting the guys ready and presenting to them with my voice and them engaging with me. It’s a little nerve-wracking and the way they responded made me feel comfortable. They gave me positive feedback, and it just shows the kind of guys that they are.”

Coming off her 2018 season averaging 13.9 points and 4.4 assists, Toliver plans to stay linked with her Wizards’ players during the Mystics’ season so you’ll probably see Beal and Wall cheer her on from the stands at  the Entertainment and Sports Arena at St. Elizabeths East.

“It’s going to be cool. They’re going to watch us play and stay connected with what we’re doing because they’ve been around me for so many months now, so we do have that connection and that relationship.”

As for the upcoming WNBA season, you can expect Toliver and the Mystics to keep the same mentality they displayed last year with new faces and even stronger team comraderies.

“Our team will look different in our make-up, but we’ll continue to get better every single day and grow with one another and build on that team chemistry that we had last year. We’re looking forward to getting back to the finals, just getting over that hump. It’s not easy and we understand the challenges that are ahead of us.”

Coaching instead of playing this past offseason hasn’t hindered Toliver’s mindset and game plan for her third season with the Mystics – it’s only made her more focused and hungrier.

“I didn’t know before I did this whether I’d actually enjoy it or if it was something I’d be passionate about. It clicked right away, and I’m really thankful that I was given that opportunity.”

The Washington Mystics will tip off for the 2019 WNBA season on Saturday, May 25, opening the season on the road versus the Connecticut Sun. Their first game in DC is on Saturday, June 1 versus the Atlanta Dream. For more information about their upcoming season, visit https://mystics.wnba.com.

Public school playground at Sedona, Arizona // Photo: Bill Bamberger

HOOPS Depicts International Connection

Basketball has always held the hearts of people from all over the world. Need proof? Just turn on your TV until you find an NBA game. Hell, you can look at just this past year’s all-star roster featuring players from Germany, Greece, Australia, Cameroon, Serbia and Switzerland all sharing the same court.

Since the 1992 Summer Olympics and the formation of the Dream Team, basketball reached a fever pitch internationally. And though it’s unlikely that most kids who pick up the ball and head to a court will make it to the professional level, the game is nonetheless celebrated and played everywhere.

“It shows how we’re all connected around this common game,” photographer Bill Bamberger says. “It’s played worldwide. You can come upon [courts] in Italy and South Africa, and you can step up and play. It’s open to anyone willing to step on the court.”

Bamberger grew up hooping when he was a child, and in 2004, the established photographer began shooting courts near his home in North Carolina. Over the next 15 years, he traveled the country – and the world – collecting a diverse set of images depicting places people shoot, dribble and ultimately connect through this game. From now until next January, 75 large-format photographs from his massive collection are on display in his exhibition HOOPS at the National Building Museum.

“It was completely unintended,” he says. “I often start my projects close to home, and you expect to find courts everywhere. I love to explore the middle of nowhere, and I’d see these courts in cotton fields and in barns. I like some of the early ones that speak toward different times; not all of them are active and some are relics.”

Though the photographs are creatively captured through a series of environmental portraits, a majority of the 22,000 pictures feature basketball courts that aren’t what you’d expect to see at your local park. Some feature murals on bordering walls and a vibrant blacktop with a plexiglass backboard, while others are made up of a dirt surface with beat-up pieces of metal acting as rims.

“You take that basic design and it becomes interpreted in different ways,” Bamberger says. “The permutations are virtually endless, and each court reflects the design and influence of the host community.”

The courts are tremendously varied and display a certain amount of ingenuity on the part of the people who put them in place, while the backdrops for the photographs shed light on the communities they serve. From Italy and South Africa to New Hampshire and Philadelphia, each portrait displays a unique sense of place.

“I drove through Colorado and Utah and South Dakota just looking for hoops, and they were everywhere,” he says. “One of my favorites is a campsite in Utah. There was a hoop in the middle of these grassy fields and I photographed them in the distance, making the point that even in really remote places like this, you’ll find a court for young people.”

Bamberger didn’t just focus on public places; he often found extremely intimate settings worth immortalizing. There are a number of selections featuring courts in abandoned areas and others in family backyards.

“[For] some of the private places, I would stop and knock on the door. In every instance, I would ask. The same is true internationally. I remember I was on a court in Naples, Italy and there was a lot of ballers playing on the court. There was one who spoke some English, and I just asked them to clear the court.”

If nothing else, Bamberger set out to show how connected we are as a society through this one universal game. Whether your court is regulation-size in the middle of a city or involves a tree, a hubcap and a block of crooked wood, you can still pick up the ball and hoop.

“It’s been one of the truly fun projects to work on,” the photographer says, reflecting on the past decade. “I work on long-term projects, and as an artist, it’s been a joy to have something I can take worldwide. It represents the full range of the work. It’s probably time to let go, but it’s going to be hard. This exhibition represents a stopping point and opportunity to reflect on the project.”

HOOPS will be at the National Building Museum through January 5. Admission to the museum is $10. For more of Bamberger’s work, visit www.billbamberger.com.

National Building Museum: 401 F St. NW, DC; 202-272-2448; www.nbm.org

Light It UP! Scores Funding For Alexandria Basketball Courts

It’s truly amazing what a group of citizens can do when they partner up on something they care about – even if it’s something as simple as installing lights at outdoor basketball courts.

Started by Alexandria, Virginia natives Chris Denby, Bruce Falk and Mike Porterfield, community group Light It UP! (LIU) has gained enough support to partner with the City of Alexandria to provide lights at the basketball courts at Potomac Yard Park. Through fundraising efforts in the area, the group’s connections with Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson and councilman John Taylor Chapman, and sheer patience and determination, this $150,000 project has become a reality.

In 2016, the trio noticed there was inequity at the brand-new facilities at Potomac Yard, whether they were just passing by or in Porterfield’s case, picking up his son from the park just after dusk. There were lights on the tennis courts but not on the basketball courts. His son was shooting baskets in pitch black, but light was coming from the tennis courts, which didn’t seem right to him.

“As I’m waiting for him, I’m texting [Mayor] Wilson because we all know he’s dialed in,” Porterfield says. “He responded saying, ‘You’re a little late to the party; there’s already two guys [Falk and Denby] who are on it.’”

Mayor Wilson, along with the Alexandria City Council, supported the creation of a public-private partnership to help fund the new project, giving the guys the freedom to really make it happen.

“From there, Mike was a huge help, spurring us along with connections, energy and fundraising expertise that Bruce and I didn’t have prior to this,” Denby says. “We also took advantage of a lot of the opportunities [nonprofit] ACT for Alexandria provided to get well-known in the community. Their fundraising efforts were great and gave us some more clout.”

ACT for Alexandria’s annual Spring2ACTion event aims to strengthen the local community as a “giving day” to support all the nonprofits doing incredible work locally, which benefited LIU’s progress as well.

“We got some camera time, and experienced good camaraderie with people organizing Alexandria-specific events,” Falk says. “John and Justin came out to dunk on our mini-hoop; those things also lead to productive, positive photo ops that we can leverage on Facebook and elsewhere – things that are individually small but amplify one another.”

LIU is all about extending the use of the basketball courts and their overall time availability, but there’s also increased opportunities for local rec leagues and others that might be able to take advantage of the courts in a structured way “that’s beneficial to specific organizations and the city in terms of revenue and maintenance,” Falk says. “We think of it as a positive feedback loop.”

Of course, only time will tell the long-term impact LIU will make, but it’s clear the project is creating opportunities for the overall community.

“The legacy of what this could be [includes] more kids who are staying occupied, doing healthy activities and not hanging out playing video games when the weather is good,” Denby says. “You’ll get adults that are staying fit, staying happy and they’re outside being good citizens for good health. There’s no measure for that, but you know that it’s going to be the result.”

Falk touches on an invisible benefit for people that have been going by Potomac Yard, seeing lights from the tennis courts and darkness on the basketball courts.

“For people inclined to make use of the basketball courts, there was an implicit message that they are somehow less important, or their needs are somehow less important,” he says. “Now that the lights are going up, we are showing the city values everybody equally.”

Not only that, the usage of the courts will increase significantly, raising an excellent point about the numbers of the sport.

“In basketball, you’re going to get at least 10 people playing and sometimes more,” Falk says.

Denby adds, “There’s always someone saying, ‘I got next game.’ The force multiplier is huge. You’re rotating through [players] on a good day.”

The lights have been ordered by the City of Alexandria and the LIU team is waiting eagerly for the installation date. Signage is being finalized and funds are completely transferred. Now all that’s left to do is host the unveiling later this spring.

“The unveiling should be awesome,” Falk says. “[We’ll] have two rec kids’ teams, and we’ll have them play under the lights. We’re excited be able to recognize all our donors and major supporters.”

Light It UP! is successfully bringing lights to the community basketball courts at Potomac Yard Park thanks to PARKnerships with the Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities (RPCA).


To learn more and receive updates about the LIU project, visit www.fb.com/pg/lightituppotomacyards.

Photo: Ned Dishman, NBA Photos

DC Enjoys A New Kind Of Go-Go

After years of planning and construction, people in the DMV can finally travel to into the city to see live go-go. And I don’t mean go-go music, the genre founded by DC legend Chuck Brown. I mean Capital City Go-Go basketball.

With a home court at the brand-new Entertainment and Sports Arena in Southeast, the NBA G-League’s Capital City Go-Go kicked off their first season in the District last November. Owned and operated by Monumental Sports, the city’s newest professional basketball team serves as a developmental team for prospects who need to improve before jumping to an NBA roster.

“It’s good basketball, a lot of talent and a lot of highlights,” rookie guard Chris Chiozza says. “The people we have on this roster are incredible. We have NBA guys, some people that should be in the NBA, people trying to get into the NBA and people that are trying to get called up. We’re a fun team to watch.”

The NBA G-League is the official minor league of the NBA, providing players out of college like Chiozza, foreign prospects from overseas or even high school grads forgoing college the opportunity to test themselves at a higher level of competition. There are currently 27 teams, and the games can be seen on ESPN, NBA TV and local networks.

For years, the Wizards sent players they were interested in to neighboring teams, but now they’ve finally established their own developmental program. However, the team is far from just a little brother to the Wizards, as the quality of play is nothing to undermine. In its inaugural season, the team is off to a successful start at 15-11, good for second place in the Southeast division.

“It’s been pretty good,” head coach Jarrell Christian says. “Nobody really knew what to expect coming in, but I think obviously we’ve won some games. Once you develop a team and the players as individuals, the wins will follow. I think our guys have done a really good job at becoming better players and better men on and off the court.”

While every pro sports team views winning as the ultimate goal, being in the minor leagues involves adjusting this mindset as individuals on the roster are constantly working on their own skills in the hopes of getting a contract with an NBA team. Several players have been on both DC teams since October including Jordan McRae, Devin Robinson and the team’s top pick from last year’s draft, Troy Brown Jr.

“I looked at a recent boxscore for the Wizards, and there were four or five guys who had played for the Go-Go this season,” Christian says. “That’s the whole reason why we’re here. The fact that we’ve been able to get those guys playing minutes before playing in an NBA game is why we exist. I’m excited about it, and we have a talented team.”

While a majority of rosters will include a number of younger players, veterans who refuse to give up on the dream of the major leagues round out the rest of the spots. Former University of Maryland guard Pe’Shon Howard is no stranger to playing in the G-League after suiting up for the Sacramento Kings’ developmental team last season.

“This [first year] has gone really well,” Howard says. “For a team that’s pretty big, with the staff and players we have, it’s really well put together for a first year. We have an identity and the coaches have us playing confidently.”

As a veteran, Howard understands the importance of balancing the team’s success with his own skill development. Scouts, coaches and fans are always drawn to teams that win, which in theory will help players get to that next level.

“For me, the main thing is competing and winning,” Howard says. “I think for me and this organization, we all know that winning is the easiest way to [personal] success. It makes it a lot easier to develop and adjust, because it’s not always about me. I always want to be on a team that wins.”

With talented players, innovative coaches and a beautiful new arena, the Go-Go have largely shunned any growing pains by establishing themselves as a tough out for other teams. Don’t miss out on the remainder of the season, as the team marches toward the G-League playoffs, because these are high-level players making music on the court.

“I think a big part of us being an expansion team is being innovative,” Christian says. “We have to continue to see what works best as a staff and for our players.”

For more information on the Capital City Go-Go or for tickets to future games, visit https://capitalcity.gleague.nba.com.


Long Island Nets v Capital City Go-Go

The Entertainment and Sports Arena Breathes New Life Into City

After more than a year of construction starting in summer 2017, the Entertainment and Sports Arena opened last September in Southeast DC. The multiuse facility, designed to host everything from concerts to e-sports competitions, is the practice facility for the Wizards, Mystics and Capital City Go-Go – and the home court for the latter two teams. On Tap spoke with Events DC President Gregory O’Dell about the $65 million, 4,200-seat arena’s local impact and future programming.

On Tap: What has the response from the local community been like so far?
Gregory O’Dell:
The response has been overwhelmingly fantastic. One of the things we wanted to do was put people to work. We had more than $10 million in construction contracts in [Ward 8], and more than 50 percent of the staff in the building are from Ward 7 and Ward 8. We thought this would be a great catalyst [for Congress Heights] and will drive foot traffic there. It’ll be the start of a wider and broader project.

OT: Now that it’s been operating for a few months, has the arena met expectations?
GO:
It has. We’re seeing the diversity in the programming that we wanted. People are coming from across the city and it gives people access to Congress Heights, which will bode well for the future and the community.

OT: How has the relationship with the Wizards, Capital City Go-Go and Mystics bolstered the arena’s programming?
GO:
I’ll give lots of credit to Mayor [Muriel Bowser] and [Monumental CEO] Ted Leonsis. The Wizards enjoy the training facility, [as well as] the fans of the Go-Go and Mystics. They’ve all been supportive of us and we enjoy having them there.

OT: Have there been any unforeseen setbacks?
GO:
Everything has gone smoothly. In fairness to the city, they’ve done an incredible job with the infrastructure job of the campus. There are growing pains for everyone when there’s construction, and we’ll have to make adjustments with the growth, but it’s nothing to complain about and we’re pleased.

For more information about the arena and news about future programming, visit www.esaontherise.com.

The Entertainment and Sports Arena: 1100 Oak Dr. SE, DC; 202-249-3000; www.esaontherise.com

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 24: John Wall #2 and Bradley Beal #3 of the Washington Wizards pose for a portrait during media day at the Entertainment and Sports Arena at St. Elizabeth's on September 24, 2018 in Washington, DC. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Ned Dishman/NBAE via Getty Images)

Wizards Hope New Additions Will Help Shake Slow Start

The Washington Wizards should be reminding themselves it’s early, because it is. Even though our hometown team has started slowly out of the gate, the nucleus of John Wall, Bradley Beal and Otto Porter Jr. are undeniably talented. And in an Eastern Conference that’s more top-heavy than deep, these three athletes should be more than enough to get the team into the playoffs.

And as the Wizards’ new additions get acclimated in head coach Scott Brooks’ system playing with the aforementioned stalwarts, the squad should play better as the 2018-2019 season continues.

Fresh faces include future Hall of Fame center Dwight Howard, combo guard Austin Rivers and veteran Jeff Green. Each player brings a skill set missing from the Wizards roster in past seasons, as the team often sputtered due to its lack of depth.

The team shifted from longtime starting center Marcin Gortat to Howard, a player who’s undoubtedly been one of the greatest at his position for the past decade. Though he’s only 32 years old, he’s been playing in the NBA since the 2004-2005 season so he has some mileage on his legs, which could be a cause for concern later in the season.

He’s averaged nearly 18 points and 13 rebounds per game during his career, providing a consistent presence on the boards and in the paint on both sides of the court. Because of early injuries, Howard has missed much of the team’s lackluster start to the season; however, he should make his triumphant return in early November.

Meanwhile Rivers can play the point and off-ball, and is a capable scorer who averaged 15 points per game last season for the Los Angeles Clippers. His flexibility gives the team a reliable third guard, a piece they’ve been searching for since signing Wall and Beal to big extensions in the past few years.

As of late October, the team is 1-5 with several noticeable areas they could improve. Their rebound rate is dead last in the league with a paltry 42.9 percent. Considering the Wizards play with the third-highest pace, they’re leaving ample rebounds unaccounted for, giving other teams opportunities to get second and third shot attempts.

Howard should help with this significantly upon his return, as the team has been forced to go small and play undersized guys like natural power forwards Markieff Morris and Green at center for extended minutes.

Green is another newcomer who should help the Wizards down the stretch of the season. The power forward provides shooting and athleticism off the bench, and always has the potential to score 20-30 points in any game. The knock on his game throughout his career is the inconsistency of these flashes, because as exciting as they are when they’re happening, it can be maddening to watch when they’re not.

Returning players rounding out the team are Morris at forward, small forward Kelly Oubre Jr., center Ian Mahinmi, guard Tomas Satoransky and center Jason Smith.

Wing Troy Brown Jr., the team’s first-round pick of the 2018 NBA draft, should also provide punch off the bench as he gets more comfortable playing in the league. At 6-foot-7, his length will help on the defensive side of the ball against Eastern Conference teams like the Milwaukee Bucks, Boston Celtics and Toronto Raptors.

So yes, the Wizards have gotten off to a slow start, fielding a bottom-10 offensive (104.9) and defensive (114.5) rating so far this season. But with the talent of the roster and most of the season still ahead of them, it’s not time to panic yet. The new additions will help, but Wall, Beal and Porter Jr. will be relied on heavily to steady the ship as the calendar progresses – something they did two years ago.

For more information about the Washington Wizards and to purchase home game tickets, visit www.nba.com/wizards. If you want to hear more basketball opinions from Trent Johnson and a few of his friends, check out his podcast Trolling the Paint on Spotify, iTunes or Anchor.

Capital One Arena: 601 F St. NW, DC; 202-628-3200; www.capitalonearena.com