Photo: Aja Neal
Photo: Aja Neal

Fall Forecast: Fresh Autumn Brews

Swig the last gulps of refreshing summer sours and get ready for fresh autumn brews recommended by some of our favorite local retailers. If you’re not too pumped about pumpkin ales, there are plenty of other familiar flavors brewed or sold locally – from sweet beers with hints of pecan, yams or coffee to malty Belgians and crisp brut IPAs. And don’t worry, you won’t have to give up sours completely, with some fall-forward fruit options on the horizon. Learn more about what’s hot for fall from these beer experts.

Photo: Aja Neal

Photo: Aja Neal

Julie Drews and Beth Helle
Co-Owners, The Brew Shop

On Tap: What beers are you looking forward to stocking in fall?
Beth Helle: One thing we love to do in the fall is create our own pumpkin patch, which is our own in-house, mixed six different pumpkin beers. It allows customers to have their pumpkin fix and to try a bunch of different ones without committing to a full six-pack.

OT: Which local brands are popular sellers in the fall?
Julie Drews: Port City’s Oktoberfest is always a big hit. Old Ox does a can, which is somewhat unique.
BH: Three Notch’d always does well. They always hit us up with amazing seasonals. Their seasonal gose will be pomegranate during [fall]. It’s fun to see the sour trend continuing over the fall. I’m sure that it’ll continue to be popular with the changing of fruits for the season.

OT: What brands will you have on tap?
BH: We always have a dedicated sour line, and that will continue all year. We’ll be shifting our fruited sours to more fall-forward fruits. I also think we’ll have an opportunity to play around with more brut beers versus true sours. As we move into the cooler weather, we can play around with a little more funk on that sour line.

The Brew Shop: 2004 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA; www.arlbrew.com

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Erika Goedrich
Owner, Craft Beer Cellars

OT:  When people think fall, they often think pumpkin. Is there another top flavor people overlook?
Erika Goedrich: 3 Stars’ Southern Belle imperial brown ale is year-round now, but that’s a good fall drink. Abita comes out with a pecan harvest at that time. There are different pecan beers available that I think are good for that time of year.

OT:  Is there a summer beer that you think people can still enjoy in the fall?  
EG: I feel like DC summers go into the fall, so are you going by weather or calendar year? [Laughs] I drink lagers and pilsners year-round – for me that’s great. The Old Pro from Union [Craft Brewing] is a gose that our customers can’t seem to get enough of. That one’s technically a summer seasonal. It goes until September I think; it’s a gose-style, which is a salt-forward sour. Again, people are looking for that year-round.

Craft Beer Cellar: 301 H St. NE, DC; https://dc.craftbeercellar.com

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Sean Michaels and Josh Whisenant
Society fulfillment associates, The Bruery Store

On Tap: What Bruery flavors are on-trend for fall?
Sean Michaels: We actually have fall beers we carry year-round. We use a lot of yam and spices like cinnamon – a lot of the beers for fall are darker.
Josh Whisenant: I don’t think we have a specific “every fall we produce this beer” apart from The Bruery’s flagship beer, which is called Black Tuesday and comes out every October.

OT: What is your favorite fall beer crafted by The Bruery?
JW: We have so many different beers that come in every month. I really do like Autumn Maple; I think it’s a wonderful beer. It’s easy to drink and it’s not super heavy.
SM: I would probably go for the So Happens It’s Tuesday or [something] with coffee. It’s just a heavier, darker style that kind of gives you that fall feeling. But don’t get me wrong – you can drink it year-round.

The Bruery: 513 Morse St. NE, DC; www.thebruery.com

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Photo: Fareeha Rehman

Tristan Walton
Store manager, Schneider’s of Capitol Hill

On Tap: What are some hot sellers for fall?
Tristan Walton: I’m always a big fan of the traditional German Oktoberfest – Hacker-Pschorr, Paulaner. Those are always the biggest sellers for me, the traditional styles.

OT: What about the best summer-to-fall flavor transition?
TW: You can do like a nice amber, like Chin Music from Center of the Universe [Brewing Company] is a good one. So, [beers] keeping in the amber themes.

OT: Your personal fall favorite?
TW: During the fall, I always enjoy a good Schlafly pumpkin [ale].

Schneider’s of Capitol Hill: 300 Massachusetts Ave. NE, DC; www.cellar.com

Photo: Aja Neal

Photo: Aja Neal

Shawntel Pike
Assistant manager, Total Wine Alexandria

On Tap: Tell us about your favorite fall seasonals.
Shawntel Pike: I like a lot of the more Belgian-style dark beers. Hardywood will start putting out some really nice stuff [for fall]. They do some nice Belgian-style, and they will start doing some barrel-aged, darker stuff in the fall, but they’re still on the lighter side now. I like their peach one now. I like fruity flavors for fall; I don’t think people really look for them, but I like them. Blackbeard’s Breakfast by Heavy Seas is really good – it’s very dark and boozy.

OT: What are some of your best-selling beers?
SP: I know we do really well with the pumpkin beers. They’re really popular, but those will die off around Thanksgiving. As far as the rest of the fall beers, they’re just all over the place depending on what people are looking for. Schlafly flies out of here.

OT: What do you feature in the growler station during the fall?
SP: I try to feature different beers all the time because we don’t want to do the same beers over and over – people get burnt out that way. We tend to have a couple of IPAs on tap. We’ll have a couple of darker beers like a stout or a porter. We normally keep a sour on tap, and we’ll do a couple of pale, golden wheat-style ales.

Total Wine Alexandria: 6240 Little River Turnpike, Alexandria, VA; www.totalwine.com

Photo: Bill McNavage
Photo: Bill McNavage

A Day in the Life: Primrose Power Couple Lauren Winter and Sebastian Zutant

Lauren Winter and Sebastian Zutant are the real definition of a DC power couple, and they are far, far away from politics. Winter is the studio head for Edit Lab at Streetsense, and the creative mind behind a slew of the District’s most eye-catching restaurant layouts. Meanwhile Zutant has risen the ranks in area restaurants, leading the wine program at Proof and beverage resurgence at Rasika and opening popular spots Komi in Dupont and Red Hen in Bloomingdale. Now, the husband-wife team has joined forces to open French bistro and wine bar Primrose in Brookland, the up-and-coming neighborhood they call home. From the light and whimsical décor and disarming appeal to the unique natural wine selection and insanely talented French chef, Primrose is once again putting this couple at the top of their game. On Tap interviewed the duo on their inspiration for the charming neighborhood spot, upcoming projects and their must-haves (an obscenely priced espresso machine is on the list!)

On Tap: What brought about the concept for Primrose? Was it a specific influence or feeling of something missing in the area?
Sebastian Zutant: Originally, it was going to be a Mediterranean or Moroccan-influenced restaurant with a wine bar aspect, but I was having a hard time verbalizing my own concept, which seems odd. And then I was just thinking about it, and thought, “I’m a sommelier, and no one does wine better than France and no one does food or cheese better.”  The fashion is pretty dope, so I said to Lauren, “What about French?” and she was all about it too, so we changed the concept.
Lauren Winter: I’ve always thrived on discovering what is missing in neighborhoods and pairing restaurant/bar owners with areas that might suit them. Opening a restaurant among the already established neighborhood restaurants and bars of Brookland was a recommendation from a friend who owns a nearby restaurant, saying our concept would be a welcome addition.

OT: Why Brookland and what does Primrose bring to the neighborhood?
LW: Brookland has always been special to us because our kids go to school in that neighborhood and we recently moved there to be close to the school. We think the natural wine focus and French food fills a gap in Brookland. The corner lot was ideal and having operable windows on two sides was the main draw to the space. The size, location and space just seemed too perfect for what we wanted, so we couldn’t pass it up.
SZ: We love the neighborhood. We live there – it’s quirky and super artsy with funky houses and the people that live there are super neat. We just wanted to bring a cool neighborhood wine bar and bistro [to the area]. Ultimately, our goal was to open a little wine bar, but fortunately the space is larger than a wine bar. We are trying to keep it humble [with] a neighborhood vibe, so anyone feels they can walk in any time of day or night and grab a glass of wine and pâté and be on their way or stick around and relax.

OT: What is the daily grind like for you all?
LW: Sebastian does the day-to-day in the restaurant with our amazing management team. I still hold my day job in the design world and try to do some upkeep for the restaurant on the weekends relative to the furniture, lighting and plants. With two little boys, keeping our private lives busy, it’s important to balance out home and work life.

OT: What makes Primrose stand out from other wine bars? What is distinct about it?
SZ: I would argue right off the bat that the physical presence of the place is very different. Lauren really knocked this one out of the park. Everyone focuses on the feathers and chandeliers, but for me, it’s that turquoise back bar that sets it apart. You walk in and it’s a breath of fresh air in terms of overall design. And 90 percent of our wine list is natural  – the grapes are grown organically . [It is] minimalist winemaking to its cleanest core that doesn’t take anything out of the wine. And our chef definitely sets it apart. He was at The French Laundry [in California] a couple years ago and cooked at Daniel [in NYC] for a year and has some serious chops.
LW: Sebastian has always looked to push the envelope, offering wines that are reasonable priced and accessible. I think the most unique aspect is that we feature the Lightwell Survey Wines that Sebastian and his partners make locally.


Sebastian’s Must-Haves
A really good wine key
Fernet-Branca amaro
Properly temped wine refrigerators
A stereo system that only functions on one channel, so I can literally plug in my phone and press play
An espresso machine that I spent an ungodly amount of money on, and my partners and wife were like, “Wtf?” and I said, “This thing is amazing, and it will keep me running forever.”

Lauren’s Must-Haves
Respect for different types of people and personalities
A familial atmosphere with great lighting
Wine poured at the proper temperature
A maintenance program
Plenty of laughter, like the loud belly laugh or snort that you sort of get embarrassed about (but not really)


OT: Sebastian, how does Primrose play a role in the evolution of wine drinking in the area?
SZ: I think we are in the chat when it comes to best wine bars in the city. It’s a fun, small crowd of wine bars and we all vibe together and know each other. My style is very different than everyone else’s – totally left of center. I’m selling a sauvignon blanc that is nothing like a sauvignon blanc. It’s funky and really rich. I have a fun staff that gets really nerdy and excited about wine who thinks that is so cool, and I educated my staff to educate the consumer. Our approach is more about information and changing people’s minds.

OT: Lauren, tell us about the fantastic design of Primrose and how it came about?
LW: The space was naturally light and airy, so there was no way to fight that with anything dark or heavy. We pulled a lot from our visit to France – items like the entryway with the restaurant’s name and logo – and the zinc bar was a must-have statement piece that we fell in love with when in little Paris bistros. There are other items that aren’t specifically French, but a nod to French design: the ostrich feather chandeliers, the floor-to-ceiling graphic wall covering and tiles in the restroom, and the Haint blue bar, which was pulled from the French side of New Orleans porches.

OT: Any projects coming up that you can tell us about?
SZ: Lightwell Survey will be doing a collaboration with Right Proper Brewing, where we will take the yeast from the wine and age one of the beers on it and then do a riesling/beer mash-up. Expect that to come out some time in September. And we’ve got some other projects in the works but can’t talk about that just yet.

Learn more about Primrose at www.primrosedc.com.

Primrose: 3000 12th St. NE, DC; 202-248-4558; www.primrosedc.com

Photo: Greg Powers
Photo: Greg Powers

New and Notable: August 2018

On Tap keeps locals in the know about the hottest new food and drink spots around town and the top culinary happenings of the month. Read on to get the inside scoop on what’s new and notable in the DC area.

NEW

Gravitas
Open: July 3
Location: Ivy City
Lowdown: Matt Baker’s sophisticated tasting menu restaurant has literally been years in the making. The chef has taken the former Pappas Tomato Factory and transformed it into an urban oasis where minimalist fixtures, mossy accents and hanging terrariums are juxtaposed with original 1940s brick, windows and steel beams. This antique character is what drew him to Ivy City in the first place, along with the opportunity to help weave the fabric of a burgeoning community. Gravitas is the first tasting menu restaurant to hit the neighborhood, with a selection of 15 dishes – half of which are vegetarian – that can be mixed and matched to create a custom tasting of four, five, six or seven courses. Baker says he wanted a restaurant that allowed him to dream up and serve manicured, experimental dishes. That’s evident in courses like a gruyère agnolotti decorated with a fried ash chip reminiscent of webbed sea coral. Baker focuses as much on sourcing as he does on experimenting, pulling ingredients almost exclusively from the Mid-Atlantic region. In the coming weeks, he will debut a rooftop bar and garden supplying produce like tomatoes, eggplants, zucchini and more. The bar program features spirits and brews from the restaurant’s Ivy City neighbors, used in drinks that incorporate seasonal vegetables. The wine list is comprised of mostly food-friendly options to facilitate pairings with a wide spectrum of flavors. 1401 Okie St. NE, DC; www.gravitasdc.com

La Vie
Open: July 12
Location: District Wharf
Lowdown: Social Restaurant Group is expanding their portfolio, which already includes Provision No. 14 and Pamplona, among others, to include a posh waterfront restaurant, bar and event space. The vast fifth floor venue boasts panoramic views of the river through floor-to-ceiling windows in the main dining room, and has three more spaces, each with a distinct vibe. The Conservatory bar and lounge is covered in climbing greenery and matching plush upholstery. The Chandelier Room is, expectedly, adorned with a display of 15 of the hanging fixtures. Finally, the Ledge is a sprawling waterfront terrace. The menu nods to the riverfront location with coastal fare like seafood towers, spreads, house-made pastas, mussel pots, whole branzino, and mainland fare like steak frites and a decadent burger. Drinks follow suit with spritzes, shareable cocktails and plenty of bubbly. 88 District Sq. SW, DC; www.laviedc.com

Poca Madre
Open: June 19
Location: Chinatown
Lowdown: To say Poca Madre is Victor Albisu’s passion project would be an understatement. After closing his South American grill, Del Campo, Albisu and his team poured their hearts and souls into its replacement. Poca Madre is a sincere homage to Mexico, celebrating the country’s history, culture, agriculture and cuisine. The menu is, simply put, an exploration of contemporary Mexican dining. But every aspect, from the sourcing to the recipes, tells a deeper story. Dishes include flashes of influence from the various periods of colonization by Europeans and the far-reaching trade routes that brought Southeast Asian spices and herbs to the country. Many ingredients are imported from Mexico to support local farmers including sea salt, grasshoppers, cocoa nibs and dry maíz that is cooked, soaked, scrubbed and ground to form tortillas, which are cooked to order. The resulting product is unlike any tortilla I’ve had before: deeply flavored, crispy yet soft and enticingly aromatic. The small plates and entrées put creative twists on traditions, like a corn risotto that conjures the flavors of elote and a shrimp and cuttlefish ceviche with flat noodles made from the two types of seafood. Drinks rely heavily on the spirit made from the plant featured in Poca Madre’s logo and décor, with a liquid nitrogen-frozen margarita and a take on a Mai Tai that uses mezcal and cantaloupe seed orgeat. The space is accented by suspended greenery, a mirror carried over from Del Campo’s bar and a striking piece of artwork that clearly communicates the team’s view on immigration: a depiction of a freestanding open door on the U.S.-Mexico border modeled after a real-life installation from 1988. 777 I St. NW, DC; www.pocamadredc.com

San Lorenzo
Open: June 25
Location: Shaw
Lowdown: Chef Massimo Fabbri, known and loved for his cooking at Tosca and Posto, opened his own restaurant in Shaw in honor of his family and the cuisine of his home in Tuscany. The spot is named for Fabbri’s favorite neighborhood in Florence, and his son, who is named after the patron saint of cooks. The menu is succinct and simple, with classic Tuscan recipes and a few salutes to his time at Tosca. Start with antipasti like tuna carpaccio, panzanella or fried squash blossoms, and be sure to sample the fresh pastas. My favorite was the tortelli stuffed with robiola and black truffle complemented by a porcini mushroom sauce. Entrées range from sautéed scallops to a grilled T-bone steak for two. To finish, there’s a selection of traditional desserts like panna cotta and fruit crostata. The bar serves both signature cocktails and unaltered Italian favorites, as well as beer and wine. Though the space is narrow, the surrounds are cozy and inviting, with Art Deco Murano glass pendants, brick peeking through distressed plaster and Florentine-inspired patterned tiles. 1316 9th St. NW, DC; www.sanlorenzodc.com

NOTABLE

Test Kitchen Tuesdays
Date: Tuesdays during the summer
Location: The Oval Room
Lowdown: For Chef Bryan Moscatello at The Oval Room, the new Test Kitchen Tuesday series is the perfect outlet for culinary creativity. Each Tuesday, he creates a three-course menu that showcases unusual ingredients, cutting-edge techniques and out-of-the box dishes, all within a chosen theme. Previous Test Kitchen menus have covered ideas like “Memories of a Jersey Shore Clam Bake,” “The Parents Are Away So It’s Breakfast for Dinner,” and “Who Cooked Roger Rabbit,” with dishes ranging from a lobster burger to a take on steak and eggs with beef tongue and a quail egg. The menu is available at the bar or on the patio every Tuesday for $45 per person. There is also an optional $25 drink pairing. 800 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.ovalroom.com

Wandering Oasis
Date: Now through fall
Location: Various locations around DC
Lowdown: DC’s Mixtress, Gina Chersevani, has taken her show on the road. She recently debuted Wandering Oasis, a 27-foot traveling cocktail truck, at various locations around the District. The truck is covered with giant banana leaves and tropical birds and supplies drinkers with frozen and draft cocktails like a hibiscus lemon daiquiri, citrus sour margarita, grapefruit crush and bourbon mint tea. Every drink on the menu is 16 ounces and costs about $9. The menu of drinks will rotate each weekend. The truck’s planned stops are TBD, but it will definitely make a few cameos at Nats Park over the next few months. Follow Chersevani and her cocktail truck’s DC stops on Twitter at @MIXTRESSdc.

Photo: Courtesy of EatBar
Photo: Courtesy of EatBar

Roll Out the Rum

Rum is one of the most nuanced spirits, both in its craft and taste. Regional differences mean there’s a bottle of rum for just about every palate. Too often, rum’s potential is restrained behind the bar, as it’s used for little more than boozing up tropical coolers best suited for cutting through triple-digit heat indexes. Those tiki-style drinks can be fun and refreshing, but they also leave the rum itself as afterthought, masked among layers of syrupy juices and sodas.

“I think a lot of spirits professionals will second me on this,” says Matt Strickland, head distiller at District Distilling on U Street. “I think the biggest problem is that rum is viewed as sweet, cheap and not very serious.”

Refusing to let rum live with this basic reputation, a growing chorus of bartenders are ditching blenders and pineapple wedges in favor of sophisticated cocktails that showcase rum’s natural flavors. Here are five cocktails in DC designed to highlight rum’s true colors.

Crown of Love at EatBar

2 oz. Plantation O.F.T.D. Rum
0.25 oz. rhum sirop
2 dashes Bittermens Xocolatl
Mole Bitters
lemon peel rim

This rum cocktail is based on Arcade Fire’s song “Crown of Love,” according to EatBar Spirits Manager Brian McGahey.

“‘[The song] captures the essence of crazy mad love,” he says. “It is a fitting name for this cocktail, which combines the intensity of a molasses-based dark rum that is a blend of Guyana, Jamaica and Barbados rums bottled at 69 percent alcohol, blended with a bit of rhum sirop from Martinique.”

EatBar: 415 8th St. SE, DC; www.eat-bar.com

The Migration at Kith/Kin

0.75 oz. cynar
0.75 oz. Mount Gay Black Barrel Rum
0.75 oz. Gosling’s Black Seal Rum
0.75 oz. Cocchi Storico Vermouth di Torino

The Kith/Kin bar team draws on two types of dark rum for its Manhattan-style riff, a recipe it originally credits to Ben Long of Reliable Tavern in DC’s Petworth neighborhood. The drink gets extra treatment here, spending two months aging in used Mount Gay Rum barrels before being served.

The result is a smooth, sippable cocktail with notes of charcoal and oak that bartender Dimitre Darrocan says imparts a whiskey-like flavor – one that’s miles away from tiki.

Kith/Kin at InterContinental Washington DC: 801 Wharf St. SW, DC ; www.kithandkindc.com

Full Moon Party (Photo - Courtesy of Quill - The Jefferson)

Full Moon Party at Quill

1.5 oz. Mount Gay Rum
2 oz. Thai tea apricot mix
0.25 oz. fresh lemon juice

“One of the biggest misconceptions about rum is that it’s not as versatile as other spirits, and that all rum tastes the same,” says Quill bartender Sophie Szych.

The upscale hotel bar, which also serves a Hamilton-inspired rum cocktail, takes advantage of that flexibility by using Thai tea in its Full Moon Party.

“The addition of condensed milk adds creamy roundness to the sharpness of the apricot,” Szych says.

Quill at The Jefferson: 1200 16th St. NW, DC; www.jeffersondc.com

La Fin du Monde (Photo - Courtesty of District Distilling)

La Fin Du Monde at District Distilling

1.5 oz. aged Buzzard Point Rum
0.75 oz. lemon juice
.075 oz. grenadine
0.25 oz. curacao

“When I approach a rum cocktail and it isn’t going to be tiki, I tend to look at classic serious cocktails in the canon, things like a Manhattan and an Old Fashioned,” Strickland says. “Subbing rum in for whiskey is the easiest thing to do, but you can get much more adventurous than that.”

Strickland is reviving this long forgotten rum cocktail (it originally appeared in the 1908 cocktail book World Drinks and How to Mix Them by William Boothby) in his distillery tasting room and using his distillery’s new barrel-aged rum as the base.

District Distilling: 1414 U St. NW, DC; www.district-distilling.com

Columbia Room cocktail (Photo - Karlin Villondo Photography)

A Spot in the Shade at Columbia Room

3 oz. clarified watermelon juice
1.5 oz. Bly Rum
0.325 oz. fresh lime
0.25 oz. Keepwell Carolina gold rice vinegar
0.5 oz. rich simple syrup

“This is a refreshing summer cocktail inspired by a picnic,” says Columbia Room Head Bartender Suzy Critchlow. “We are using Bly, a new white rum from the folks that make Boyd & Blair Potato Vodka in Pennsylvania.”

The cocktail is part of the award-winning bar’s four-course summer tasting menu. If a seat at the intimate bar is too much of a task, Critchlow says the drink can be easily made at home and even batched up into a punch for sharing.

Columbia Room: 124 Blagden Alley, NW, DC; www.columbiaroomdc.com

These cocktails represent just a small number of bartenders in and around DC that are challenging how we drink rum and use it in cocktails. Notes of vanilla, caramel, oak, molasses and spices are being highlighted in drinks that range from from revised takes on stirred classics to light and fruity sippers that balance sour and sweet. So next time a rum craving hits, put down the umbrella drink and consider something more suitable for a dimly lit cocktail bar than a sunny beach.

Photos: M.K. Koszycki
Photos: M.K. Koszycki

Behind The Bar: Archipelago, Paladar and Bar Charley

Rum is so much more than the liquor component of a piña colada. We chatted with three local experts about the vibrant world of rum and tiki, and the best drinks their spots have to offer in honor of National Rum Day on August 16.


Owen Thomson - Photo by M.K

Owen Thomson
Owner, Archipelago

On Tap: Tell me about the different rums featured on your menu.
Owen Thomson: Rum is one of the most varied spirits in the world because no other spirit is produced in as many places. It’s made from sugarcane – most are made from molasses – and you’ll find a few producers making it from fresh-pressed sugarcane juice. There’s a whole manner of ways people try to classify rum, and the easiest way that I was taught has to do with colonial pieces: there’s English, French and Spanish.

OT: How do you decide which style of rum goes in which drink?
OT: Tiki has a pantheon of classic cocktails that call upon certain styles of rum, but more interesting is the fact that most of them call on multiple rums. So rather than a drink needing two ounces of Jamaican rum, you might have three different rums in a tiki drink, which creates a drink you really can’t get anywhere else.

OT: What’s your favorite drink on the menu and why?
OT: I always enjoy the Mai Tai. It is obviously an old school drink that people who don’t even work in tiki learn how to make. It was my introduction to this style of drink, so figuring out our Mai Tai blend was one of my favorites.

OT: What sets Archipelago apart from other bars that heavily feature rum-based drinks?
OT: We are the only tiki bar in the area. This time of year, you’ll see a lot of tiki menus or people will flip their outdoor bar for a summer tiki menu. A lot of people switch to rum this time of year, but we do it all year. Tiki is only partially about the drinks. It encompasses the whole vibe, [including] the décor. If you don’t have that, you don’t have a tiki bar.

Jungle Room Experience 2 - Photo by M.K

The Jungle Room Experience
Rhum agricole
Blue Curaçao
Soursop
Cachaça
Apricot
Lemon

Archipelago: 1201 U St. NW, DC; www.archipelagodc.com

Gavin Nazareth 2 Photo by M.K

Gavin Nazareth
Bartender, Paladar Tysons Corner

On Tap: Your menu features a wide array of rums, and a key to what rums are similar to other types of liquors. What inspired your expansive, detailed menu?
Gavin Nazareth: A lot of people aren’t into rums and don’t know what good rums are. If you’re a bourbon drinker, there are rums that we have that will closely mirror a bourbon flavor. Obviously, rums are a little sweeter than bourbons or whiskeys or scotches that might have a bit of a bite to them.

OT: Can you tell me about the flights you offer?
GN: We encourage people to try our rum flights because you get to taste different flavors. They’re only half-ounce pours – that way, you can get a flight or two and still be okay. You can do a Spanish, English, aged or spiced flight.

OT: What are some of the big differences between rum styles?
GN: Spanish and English styles are boiled down, so they’re close to a honey or molasses. Once you have that concentrated flavor, you add water and yeast to it. The French style is different – it’s almost like a gin. You take out the sugarcane juice and add yeast, and they’re more on the botanical side. Spanish and English are more bold and sweet, with a nice buttery finish.

OT: What’s your favorite rum drink?
GN: We showcase a different rum every month, and this month we’re doing the plantation series. Plantation rums are from Barbados. They age them in Barbados and then bring them to France for an additional step. We have something called the Plantation Jungle Burn where we use pineapple plantation rum, fresh juices [and] campari, so it has a really nice finish.

Plantation Jungle Burn - Photo by M.K

Plantation Jungle Burn
Plantation pineapple rum
Pineapple juice
Simple syrup
Lime juice
Campari

Paladar Tysons Corner: 1934 Old Gallows Rd. Vienna, VA; www.paladarlatinkitchen.com

DSCN4320

Brendan Mullin
Bartender, Bar Charley

On Tap: Tell me about the rum drinks you feature on tap.
Brendan Mullin: We have two cocktails on tap, and a whole tiki menu that contains a lot of our rum drinks. One we have on tap right now is called It’s Not a Mai Tai, It’s Our Tai. It’s white rum, curacao, pineapple, orange – a lot of tasty tropical flavors.

OT: What are your favorite drinks on the tiki menu?
BM: The Frog Smoking a Comically Large Cigar is massive, fun and has a ridiculous garnish in it, and has a blend of mezcal and rum. Our Zombie is also fantastic, but my favorite cocktail is the classic Mai Tai. In my opinion, that’s the best American cocktail. It’s a great way to try different rums.

OT: What about the non-tiki rum-based drinks?
BM: On our house cocktail menu, we have the You Can’t Do That on Television that has three different types of rum. One [rum] is infused with jalapeño and [the cocktail] also has a pistachio orgeat, so it’s kind of a riff on a Mai Tai. You Can’t Do That on Television was a show on Nickelodeon back in the day, and the drink is green and looks like slime and is reminiscent of the 90s.

OT: What food pairs best with tiki or tropical drinks?
BM: The best thing on our food menu to have next to our rum drinks is the pupu platter. It has a bunch of different food options like pork belly, wagyu beef skewers, half-smoke pierogies and crab tater tots. Anything that’s salty and has a tropical flavor to it will go really well with a sweeter tiki drink.

OT: What sets Bar Charley apart from other bars with tiki menus and large rum selections?
BM: I’d say just how comprehensive we are. People ask us if we’re a classics bar, a tiki bar or a wine bar. The answer is “Yes” across the board. We have a great wine selection, we have classics and we’re creative on our own. We can also do tiki!

You Can’t Do That On Television
Havana Club rum
Clément V.S.O.P.
Chacho
Dry curaçao
Lime juice
Pistachio orgeat

DSCN4325

Bar Charley: 1825 18th St. NW, DC; www.barcharley.com

Photo: Trent Johnson
Photo: Trent Johnson

A Day in the Life: Master Mixologist Paul Gonzalez

The concept of a passionate person is often talked about at parties and in cover letters, but it’s rare to meet someone in the flesh who truly embodies the phrase. For me, the sense of confidence and wonder that local mixologist Paul Gonzalez holds for the drink industry is uniquely infectious and authentic, and one of a litany of reasons we decided to pick his brain about his role in the local mixology scene.

On Tap: How did you get into the drink industry, and mixology specifically?
Paul Gonzalez: I’ve always been in the food and beverage industry. I’m the oldest of the four kids in my family so when I was younger, that made me my grandmother’s sous chef and that’s kind of where my flavor sensibilities started growing.  I worked in the industry through college, from server to bartender, and it was one of those things where you need the experience to get hired but can’t get experience unless you work. I would work for free until you gave me a job.

OT: Was there an “a-ha” moment when you knew this is what you are meant to do?
PG: When I got out of college, I was doing tons of stuff. I was cutting down trees, doing construction and working some office jobs because I was still trying to figure out what I wanted to do. I landed on this because I always loved what I was doing in this industry, and I always kept it in my back pocket. Even after long weeks, I wanted to get behind the bar and see my friends. If everyone is there, why be anywhere else?


Mixology Must-Haves
A strong team
A positive outlook
Good liquor
Jiggers


OT: At what point did you know moving from Norfolk to a bigger market like DC was the right move for you?
PG: I knew I needed to move and continue growing. One of my good friends moved to DC and I would go back and forth to help with his catering company. By luck, one of his roommates happened to be running the bar program at Zaytinya. I started talking to him at one of the events we used to do, and when he found out I was driving up from Norfolk, he told me if I wanted to come up to DC full-time, he’d hire me there. So I literally came up on a Thursday, interviewed, got hired and then moved my stuff up that weekend.

OT: What was your first experience in a bigger market like?
PG: I worked for ThinkFoodGroup for about three years, and I learned a ton from them. A lot of it was their philosophy on hospitality. On the drink side, they focused heavily on flavors, so it wasn’t just, “Make me an Old Fashioned or a sazerac,” but they’d give us this flavor and that flavor, and challenge us to make something with it. That process makes you hone in on what each spirit tastes like and why.

OT: After that, you landed a gig with the wildly popular Drink Company’s pop-ups. How did that move come about?
PG: I bounced around for awhile and basically interned at a few places in the area I really wanted to work for. Columbia Room was one of those places, as I had friends there. I was pretty annoying about wanting a job with them, so I worked there for free, and it kind of burnt me out. [Laughs] But as soon as they had an opening at Southern Efficiency, they let me know I was in the running. At the time, whiskey was my weakest subject, but I leaned into it and told them directly, “I came to DC to get better, this is my weakest area and that’s why I want to work here,” and the rest is history.

OT: You recently worked at The Gibson, which was described as a “dream team” of mixologists by the Washington City Paper. Was this as fun as it sounds?
PG: It was really, really cool. I’ve had a blast working with The Gibson crew. It was one of those things that just kind of snowballed. My good friend Ed Lainez took over the bar program and after running into him, he told me who he was bringing on and I immediately was like, “Can I join?” Everyone there was super talented – we just checked our egos at the door and had in-depth conversations about drinks. We just wanted to get them right.


Can’t Live Without
My girlfriend
My puppy, Puppy the Vampire Slayer
Passion for anything you do
Good food
Good drinks


OT: Your next project is back with Drink Company at Eaton Hotel’s new bar. How far along is that?
PG: The whole hotel concept is super guest interactive. The bar will be a speakeasy-esque cocktail bar. We like the boozy drinks, but there will also be light, easy sipping beverages. I believe in the three-drink philosophy, where there’s three varietals of every type of cocktail. We want people to have a good time, but the goal is to make a memory and make it last. We’re shooting for a mid-August or September opening.

OT: In the meantime, you’ve been bouncing around and freelancing at different places. Is this just to learn and pick up new skills?
PG: I took this time to work with people who inspire me and who I want to learn from. I see all these awesome people running awesome programs, and I want to go work with them and pick their brains. There aren’t many industries where you can do this. One example is Hank’s Cocktail Bar up in Petworth. Jessica Weinstein is the beverage director for all of the Hank’s [locations], and she’s someone I’ve known for a long time now. You can see that she has her own style and [has made her own] footprint on elevated cocktails, but she’s taken all of the pretension out of it.

OT: What is your process for working on drinks? Do you have a concept and then work on it alone, or do you take ideas to others?
PG: It’s a little bit of both. The team works on ideas at least once a season. For instance, I’ll tell Jackson Crowder, co-manager at the Eaton Hotel’s bar, and then on the next day we both have off, we’ll hammer out variations of whatever concept. Then we’ll take those to the big meeting, and maybe one or two – or none – make it. Drink Company’s system is one of the best I’ve seen because they’re very open to ideas and collaboration

OT: Now that you’re moving into a managerial role and you’re the one giving tips and advice to younger people in the industry, what’s your long-term plan?
PG: It’s the same thing it’s been since I did my first interview in DC: I want to have my own bar in five years. I think I said that three years ago, so I have to start making moves. [Laughs] This is such a great city for it, and I would love to do something like that here.

For updates on Eaton Hotel, visit www.eatonworkshop.com/hotel.

Follow Gonzalez on Instagram at @paullyygee.

Eaton Hotel: 1201 K St. NW, DC; 202-289-7600; www.eatonworkshop.com/hotel

Photo: Shantel Mitchell Breen
Photo: Shantel Mitchell Breen

This is SOME Burger Battle

When you think summer, many images come to mind. From beaches to barbecues, the warmest season brings with it outdoor adventures and meals to be had. Two constants for most folks during the middle months are beers and burgers, and luckily for you, DC Burger Battle is slated to host its second annual event on August 23.

Meat and beer lovers will gather at the Hill Country Backyard Barbecue lawn at the National Building Museum as 10 restaurants battle burger vs. burger to see who reigns supreme. This year’s participants are b DC Penn Quarter, Bullfeathers, Blackfinn Ameripub, The Capital Burger, Due South, Hard Rock Cafe, Hill Country Barbecue Market, Rebellion, Sign of the Whale and Stoney’s on L. (More info on the participants below.)

While this event is meant to get people out and celebrating the weather, the DC Burger Battle also acts as a benefit for the nonprofit organization So Others Might Eat (SOME), which provides food, clothing and health care to impoverished people in DC.

“We know there’s about 7,000 people experiencing homelessness in Washington, and the number of people living in poverty is more than that,” says Kate Wiley, SOME’s marketing and communications manager. “We provide crucial services for people to help get by and improve their quality of life. We hope people are excited and motivated by our great cause, and we appreciate the support.”

Aside from the contributions from proceeds, SOME is also excited to gain more traction with young professionals. For them, the added exposure makes participating in events like these a no-brainer because if people can find out more about them, they may be more likely to get involved.

“We’re excited to be able to share what we do with a whole new audience,” Wiley says. “We just want to get our name recognition out there, and we’re able to provide a description of a multitude of services that are talked about onstage.”

Though SOME provides a serious contribution to the residents of the District, even Wiley is excited to simply enjoy the outdoor weather in late August.

“I think there was a lot of enthusiasm around [last year’s] event and being able to have a good time but also support a good cause,” she says. “It’s gratifying for us to be a part of an event like that.”

The second annual DC Burger Battle takes place on Thursday, August 23 from 6-9 p.m. Tickets include burger samples and all-you-care-to-enjoy Budweiser. Tickets cost $30. Learn more at www.dcburgerbattle.com.

Hill Country Backyard Barbecue at the National Building Museum: 401 F St. NW, DC; 202-556-2050; www.dcburgerbattle.com


Burger Battlers

b DC Penn Quarter
Last year’s first-place finisher and Burger Battle champion, b DC Penn Quarter offers a variety of burgers at their locations including some non-beef varieties. “Our featured burger will be the same as last year, the Classic B Cheeseburger, with meat, cheese and bread, keeping it simple and focusing on what’s important: the beef,” says general manager Brian Beauregard. 801 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.burgersbeerbourbon.com

Blackfinn Ameripub
A serious competitor, Blackfinn Ameripub brings real ingredients by real people, and their menu always delivers a competitive burger. Though they don’t get wild with the ingredients; they focus on a traditional style, and the flavor is always present. 1620 I St. NW, DC; www.blackfinnameripub.com

Bullfeathers
With a name like Bullfeathers, you know this eatery means business. Their approach to burgers is not to be taken lightly; with a number of signature styles, variety is always an option at Bullfeathers. 410 1st St. SE, DC; www.fb.com/BullfeathersDC

The Capital Burger
Touting what they call “luxury burgers,” the Capital Burger offers a myriad of options at their brick-and-mortar site including their famous Capital Burger, featuring caramelized onions, Wisconsin Grand Cru gruyère and shallot aioli. 1005 7th St. NW, DC; www.thecapitalburger.com

Due South
A returning competitor from last year’s edition, Rusty Holman says they are still fine-tuning their burger for this year’s battle. “We will start with a high-quality brisket and chuck blend beef patty.” If you like meat on top of your meat, Due South might be for you. 301 Water St. SE, DC; www.duesouth.com

Hard Rock Cafe
Known for their décor and memorabilia adorning the restaurant, Hard Rock also serves up a fantastic burger. Last year’s burger featured a Budweiser beer sauce, look for something creative this year too. 999 E St. NW, DC; www.hardrock.com

Hill Country Barbecue Market
Though they don’t have a burger on their regular menu, the hosting Hill Country Barbecue grilled exquisite patties last year. While their expertise may lie in barbecue, the burgers from Hill Country at the DC Burger Battle will leave you wanting them when you visit the restaurant. 410 7th St. NW, DC; www.hillcountry.com

Rebellion DC
As their website says, this restaurant values American history, and when delving into the archives of our country, great burgers make frequent appearances. Count on Rebellion to carry on the tradition of churning out this delicious American favorite. 1836 18th St. NW, DC; www.rebelliondc.com

Sign of the Whale
Even though they deliver a mean crab dip and lobster bisque, Sign of the Whale is also purveyors of several burger styles including their namesake Whale Burger, which includes a patty served in between two grilled cheese sandwiches. 1852 M St. NW, DC: www.thewhaledc.com

Stoney’s
Stoney’s delivers a plethora of options at their DC location including the Stoney’s Burger, One Eye Burger and other classic variations. Be sure to try their special sauce. 1433 P St. NW, DC; www.stoneys-dc.com

Dc Beer Week

What’s On Tap: August 2018

Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1

My Imaginary Girlfriend at Lost Rhino Brewing Company
Join Lost Rhino Brewing Company for the release of their My Imaginary Girlfriend IPA. The brewery will have special pricing, giveaways and an opportunity to show off your gaming skills. There is a limited amount of M.I.G. available in cans at the brewery – only 300 cases are available. Festivities start at 1 p.m., free to attend. Lost Rhino: 21730 Red Rum Dr. Ste. 142, Ashburn, VA; www.lostrhino.com

Summer of Sour Series: De Leite
The Sovereign is thrilled to pour six drafts from one of their favorite lesser-known brewers in Belgium: Brouwerij De Leite. Highlights include Cuvée Jeune Homme, a perfectly balanced bitter-sour gem, and Cuvée Soeur’ise, in which a base tripel is soured with lacto then rolled into wine barrels with whole sour Polish cherries for six months. They will also have some Fils a Papa V, a strong ale aged in Bruichladdich Scotch barrels. 5-11 p.m. Free to attend. The Sovereign: 1206 Wisconsin Ave. NW, DC; www.thesovereigndc.com

Unibroue Beer Dinner
Featuring salmon tartare, filet mignon and house made cheesecake, Granville Moore’s is offering a wonderful food lineup for the Unibroue beer pairing. All guests will receive the official Unibroue cookbook and glassware. Unibroue is located in Chambly, Quebec and is world-famous for their adaptation of traditional Belgian ales of the Trappiste varieties and food pairings with traditional French and Belgian cuisine. 7-10 p.m. $60. Granville Moore’s: 1238 H St. NE, DC; www.granvillemoores.com

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2

CyberBrews
Join for an evening of networking, conversation and drinks with industry peers. We’re talking all things cyber and folks from the Fifth Domain’s award-winning editorial team will be there to chat with you. Oh, and beer, of course. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free to attend. Tysons Biergarten: 8346 Leesburg Pike, Tysons, VA; www.tysonsbiergarten.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3

Lost in the Wilderness at ChurchKey
ChurchKey will tap six exceptional beers from the two hard-to-find West Coast brewers. Headlining the list is a rare keg of the Lost Abbey Falling Rock, brewed for legendary beer bar Falling Rock Tap House’s 21st anniversary. This special brew is a blend of a sour blonde ale with nectarines, a cherry-infused sour red ale and a tequila barrel-aged beer. There is no admission fee for this event. All beers will be priced individually by the glass and in 4-oz. tasting pours. 4-11 p.m. Free to attend. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4

DC Country Crawl
The DC Country Crawl is the largest, wildest and rowdiest country-themed bar crawl in the city. Put on your boots and Daisy Dukes because it’s time to saddle up to the best bars on U Street. With admission, you’ll receive a signature country mug, rowdy party favors, cover free access to the U Street corridor’s best venues, specials, pictures and a raffle entry for prizes. DC Country Crawl: Various locations on U Street in NW, DC; www.projectdcevents.com

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8

Guided Cider Tasting
The District’s newest cidery, Capitol Cider House, is opening up on a Wednesday for a special treat: a grand tasting with the cider maker. You’ll learn about how cider is made and get a tour of the production area. The best part: you’ll be able to taste 10 Mid-Atlantic ciders. Following the tasting, the venue will remain open for those wishing to partake in the rest of the menu. 6-9 p.m. Tickets $20. Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

Port City Beer Event Featuring King Street Bluegrass and Big Timber
Join Port City Brewing Company at Union Stage for this free event featuring an extensive tap list of the brewery’s best beers, plus a full menu. The event will also feature music from King Street Bluegrass, a traditional blues/folk band from DC, and Big Timber. Drinks at 5 p.m., music at 7 p.m. Free to attend. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

MONDAY, AUGUST 13

Summer GAINs: 5K and Beer Tasting
Start your week off with a Monday evening run from Port City Brewing Company, now back to runs every Monday evening. Runners meet at the brewery tasting room before heading out for a one, three or five-mile run (it’s an out-and-back route so really, it’s as long as you care to make it). It’s a pleasant route through a park, then picking up a paved path along Holmes Run. 6:30-9 p.m. Port City Brewing: 3950 Wheeler Ave. Alexandria, VA; www.portcitybrewing.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17

8th Annual Cask Night at District ChopHouse
Don’t miss the eighth annual cask night at District ChopHouse featuring “Casks and Classics.” This tasting event features 20 local casks, abundant ChopHouse food offerings and a professional glass. 6-11 p.m. $50 per person. District ChopHouse and Brewery: 509 7th St. NW, DC; www.districtchophouse.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18

Paint Your Glass Off
At this beer-themed Paint Your Glass Off party, you will receive two glasses to paint (pilsner or stein), a glass of beer, all the supplies needed to paint your glass off, chances to win prizes, music, and of course, the opportunity to purchase amazing, delectable, scrumptious and savory food at happy hour prices. 1-3 p.m. Tickets $35. Brew Republic Bierwerks: 15201 Potomac Town Pl. Woodbridge, VA; www.brewrepublic.beer

Pizzeria Paradiso Summer Fest
This season’s beer fest will take place at Pizzeria Paradiso’s Dupont Circle location, which includes the spot’s lovely patio. Enjoy unlimited pizza and beer, included in ticket purchase for the four-hour event. The summer fest will also feature a draft line of rare and exception beers from several breweries. 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Tickets $80. Pizzeria Paradiso: 2003 P St. NW, DC; www.eatyourpizza.com

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

5th Annual Battle of the Barrel Ages
Brought to you by Boundary Stone Public House, local brewing legends DC Brau, Atlas, 3 Stars and Right Proper square off in a battle royale of barrel-aged beers. A panel of judges as well as the popular vote from the public will decide which brewery wins the coveted dedicated draft line for an entire year. 5:30-10:30 p.m. Boundary Stone: 116 Rhode Island Ave. NW, DC; www.boundarystonedc.com

Tap Challenge at Dacha
When talking about a new Double IPA on tap, Dacha Beer Garden thought, “Our beer club members could help!” This week, Dacha will feature three mystery Double IPAs and ask customers which one tastes best. Buy a flight and vote for which beer you think should be the beer garden’s newest tap line. 4-10:30 p.m. Free to attend. Dacha Beer Garden: 1600 7th St. NW, DC; www.dachadc.com

Sneak Peek: DC Beer Week 2018

The week-long celebration of the DMV’s craft beer scene is back once again. Presented by the DC Brewers’ Guild, the 10th annual DC Beer Week is set to run from Sunday, August 19 to Sunday, August 26. Throughout the week, local breweries, restaurants, bars and community partners are set to offer unique tastings, collaborations and events. Taste delicious brews and learn all about the world of craft beer at educational seminars. Below is just a taste of what you’ll see, as events are still being planned for the week. Be sure to check out www.dcbeerweek.net for more information as the dates draw near.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19

DC Brewers’ Guild/City Winery Lager Fest
Lager Fest is an event planned by the local brewing community to showcase this region’s best lagers for your enjoyment. This event will bring together more than 30 craft breweries for an afternoon of refreshing lager-style beers, pilsners and related summer favorites, including hard-to-find brews. The event will also feature live music from some of your favorite local bands. 1-5 p.m. $40. City Winery DC: 1350 Okie St. NE, DC; www.dcbeerweek.net

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21

DC Beer Week: The Art of Beer
Phil Runco of Brightest Young Things will moderate a panel discussion about the current state of art, design and the beer industry. This event will focus on the work that goes into the designs featured on the labels, posters and logos of area breweries. Learn more about the process of art design in the beer industry while drinking some local brews. 6-8 p.m. Tickets $15. Carriage House Gallery: 1921 Sunderland Pl. NW, DC; www.heurichhouse.org

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22

DC Brau Brewing/Jameson Game Night at the Eleanor
DC Brau and Jameson will host a Wednesday evening party at the newly opened Eleanor to celebrate their caskmates partnership. 5-11 p.m. The Eleanor: 100 Florida Ave. NE, DC;
www.eleanordc.com

SATURDAY, AUGUST 25

5th Annual Brewers on The Block
Don’t miss out on brews, food, music and more. Buffalo & Bergen and Suburbia are proud to announce the fifth annual Brewers on the Block at Union Market’s Suburbia, bringing together more than 20 of the region’s top breweries, cideries and meaderies along with friends of the block from across the country. 5-9 p.m. Union Market: 1309 5th St. NE, DC;
www.unionmarketdc.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 26

Fire Works Pizza 8th Anniversary Bash and Solidarity Pig Roast
Celebrate Fire Work’s anniversary and DC Beer Week 2018 with a solidarity pig roast. Chef Thomas will be firing up the grill and serving roasted pig, street corn and potato salad, plus enjoy live music, drink specials, prizes and giveaways. Be the first in Virginia to taste the DC Brewers’ Guild collaboration, Solidarity Pilsner, in cans. The price of a ticket gets you all-you-can-eat, plus one can of Solidarity Pilsner, Right Proper Brewing Raised by Wolves or Atlas Ponzi IPA. 12-8 p.m. $20 per ticket. Fire Works Pizza Arlington: 2350 Clarendon Blvd. Arlington, VA; www.fireworkspizza.com

TheVine_072618_Raker (87)

A Night at The Vineyard at The Vine Apartments

The Vine Apartments in Laurel, MD hosted A Night at the Vineyard with complimentary wine and specialty cocktails, hors d’oeuvres provided by Hudson Coastal and Lib’s Grill, live music from Trailer Grass Orchestra, and model apartment tours. Photos: Mark Raker

NatGeo_072518_Titanic_1 (38)

Taste of Titanic at the National Geographic Museum

The National Geographic Museum hosted a night of dining, dancing and exclusive exhibit access at Taste of Titanic. The event featured DC’s top restaurants, including Duke’s Grocery, Lucky Buns, Ri Ra, Hank’s Oyster Bar, Par Pila and District Commons, signature cocktails from Bar PX and Trummer’s on Main, and live music from King Teddy. Photos: Mark Van Bergh