Photo: Courtesy of George Mason University's Center for The Arts
Photo: Courtesy of George Mason University's Center for The Arts

Spend a Romantic Evening with Tango Buenos Aires

Tango Buenos Aires brings sensual moves to Northern Virginia on Friday, October 13 and Saturday, October 14 with their performance of The Spirit of Argentina, a journey through the transformation of one of the most famous dance styles in the world performed to the classical compositions of Carlos Gardel.

French-Argentine singer, songwriter, composer, actor and central figure in the history of tango, Gardel died tragically in a plane crash at the height of his career, making him even more immortal in tango culture.

We caught up with Tango Buenos Aires Owner/Artistic Director Rosario Bauza about what to expect from the two performances, at Hylton Performing Arts Center on October 13 and George Mason University’s Center for the Arts on October 14.

On Tap: What does tango mean to you?
Rosario Bauza: The tango is passion, but above all things is the embrace that surrounds us.

OT: What are your favorite stories to tell through tango?
RB: My favorite story is when I work with people with different abilities and through the tango, their music and dance combines with the world and art.

OT: How is tango evolving now? How are you bridging the gap between tradition and staying fresh?
RB: I think the secret is in the history of its past, and to keep it fresh in the present. And then, why not to the future?

OT: What’s the secret to performing a great tango?
RB: First, [have] a very good professional write the script, then a very good development of that script to the stage. The secret is to put all the feeling and professionalism; this is what I do with my different tango shows [and it’s] extremely successful.

OT: Tango is iconically Argentinian. Do you ever infuse influences in your dance from the cities that you travel to and perform in?
RB: The tango is iconic of Buenos Aires, therefore of Argentina. In 1991, I went with Tango Buenos Aires to China. At that time, it was not the China we see today. After a month of having gone, I read in a newspaper in Argentina that in Beijing, the Chinese were practicing tango in the public squares after having seen our performances.

OT: What are you excited about on this current tour of Tango Buenos Aires?
RB: Much of the history of this show is the life of Carlos Gardel, an icon of tango. In Argentina, they call him “the voice of tango.” I am excited that in this Tango Buenos Aires, we have Gardel and two of the countries I love: Argentina and the USA.

OT: What should the audience expect from Tango Buenos Aires if this is their first time seeing a performance? What about for those that have seen a past performance?
RB: Those who will see Tango Buenos Aires for the first time, I think they will never forget it. I am sure they will want to practice tango dance. Those who have seen a past performance will see a new version since I renew Tango Buenos Aires every three years. Tango Buenos Aires is the official name of the show, [and] the subtitle is the story that we developed – in this case, historic Carlos Gardel.

Tango Buenos Aires’ The Spirit of Argentina is in Hylton Performing Arts’ Merchant Hall on October 13; tickets are available here. The October 14 event is at George Mason University’s Center for The Arts; purchase tickets here. Also, a beginners’ tango class is available prior to the Friday night performance; sign up here

Hylton Performing Arts Center: 10960 George Mason Cir. Manassas, VA; www.hyltoncenter.org 

George Mason University’s Center for The Arts: 4373 Mason Pond Dr. Fairfax, VA; www.cfa.gmu.edu 

mm

Valeria Villarroel

Valeria Villarroel is a lover of good music, art, and food. Raised in Boston, Valeria has made Washington, DC her home since 2011. Valeria works as a video editor and freelance digital strategist, writer and social media editor for publications and businesses in the DC area. She loves comic book movies, dogs, politics, pop culture, vintage rhythm & blues, posing for impromptu fashion shoots in the middle of the sidewalk, and always leaves her coffee on the kitchen counter before heading out. You can see more of her work at www.itsvalerious.com, and you can follow her on all social media @itsvalerious.