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Music Picks: April 2019

TUESDAY, APRIL 2

Muse
Commercially successful English rock band Muse will stop in DC as a part of The Simulation Theory world tour. The band’s eighth studio album by the same name was released in November last year. Perhaps, the best way to describe their latest project is through the album cover. It was designed by Stranger Things artist Kyle Lambert, and like the show, the songs have a futuristic feel with all the trappings of electronic rock. Show starts at 7:30 p.m., tickets start at $43. Capital One Arena: 601 F St. NW, DC; www.capitalonearena.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3

Kennedy Center Spring Gala with Idina Menzel
Award-winning Broadway star, singer and actress Idina Menzel is set to perform at The Kennedy Center’s annual gala, Celebrating the Human Spirit. Menzel is best known for her portrayal of Elphaba in the smash musical Wicked and for voicing Queen Elsa in the hit animated film Frozen. Including a mix of fan favorites and original songs, the gala concert is poised to be a memorable one. This year, the center will be honoring Citizen Artist Forest Whitaker and Distinguished Philanthropists Patrick G. Ryan and Shirley W. Ryan. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets start at $99. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 5

Amanda Palmer
Amanda Palmer is absolutely haunting in her newest studio album There Will Be No Intermission. Tackling difficult subjects like abortion, miscarriages and cancer, this is exactly the kind of daring work one should expect from Palmer. She’s gained a bit of a reputation for her shocking, bold imagery – and she’s aware of it. In an interview with On Tap’s Trent Johnson, Amanda said, “You don’t go see Halloween 8 and expect a guy without a knife, just like you’re not coming to an Amanda Palmer show and expecting Disney songs and jazz hands.” Show starts at 7:30 p.m., tickets $39-$54. National Theatre: 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.thenationaldc.org

The Infamous Stringdusters
And the Grammy goes to…The Infamous Stringdusters! The quintessential progressive bluegrass band earned its first Grammy nod in 2011 for the song “Magic No. 9.” Last year, they secured the big win: Best Bluegrass Album for Laws of Gravity. In their follow-up project, The Infamous Stringdusters are expected to release a new album in April. Their jovial title track “Rise Sun” teases a groovy, uplifting celebration of life. Show starts at 9:30 p.m., tickets $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 6

The Vijay Iyer Sextet
Highly acclaimed keyboardist-composer Vijay Iyer is close to achieving icon status at the age of 47. Boasting an impressive musical catalogue, critics have offered nothing but praise for the young jazz genius. He formed the The Vijay Iyer Sextet, collaborating with five other contemporary masters to release Far From Over, an album that made Rolling Stone’s “50 Best Albums of 2017.” Shows start at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., tickets $45. The Kennedy Center: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

SUNDAY, APRIL 7

Aaron Lee Tasjan
When Aaron Lee Tasjan and his band performed at Bob Boilen’s famous Tiny Desk at NPR, Boilen later wrote, “The sound of the middle-and-late 1960s came through his sea green, Gorsuch 12-string guitar while his voice felt both familiar and fresh.” In other words, Tasjan is a vintage-loving, fedora-wearing, oldies-listening hipster. But what’s wrong with that? Especially when you’re damn good at what you do. In his new album Karma For Cheap, the Nashville resident takes audiences back in time – YouTube archives it is, youngsters – to rediscover what they love about classic rock music. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $15. Songbyrd Record Cafe and Music House: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

City of the Sun
The New York City trio City of the Sun play experimental, instrumental music with indie rock, American folk, flamenco and blues influences. Somehow, this eclectic band combines these genres in a coherent fashion. Their sound challenges the perception of instrumental music and resolves to propel it into the future. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $15-$18. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

MONDAY, APRIL 8

Neyla Pekarek
After going solo, Neyla Pekarek is soaring on her own. Formerly a cellist for the uber-successful band The Lumineers, Pekarek decided to split with the band after eight years because it was no longer the right fit. Announcing her departure, The Lumineers tweeted, “A band is like an organism – it grows, changes and evolves.” Soon after her exit, Pekarek dropped her debut solo album Rattlesnake earlier this year. She was inspired by a Colorado frontierswoman known as “Rattlesnake Kate” who, according to legend, shot 140 snakes on horseback to protect her infant son. In what she’s described as “a feminist record,” Pekarek lays her perky vocals and instruments on 13 tracks meant to inspire fellow women. Show starts at 7:30 p.m., tickets $18-$20. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 11

Arielle
Guitarist, singer-songwriter Arielle is an old fashioned, young woman from Austin who prefers all things bohemian and lives to jam out. Her classical folk-rock sound has caught the attention of many notable acts. She’s opened for Heart, Vince Gill, Eric Johnson, Joan Jett, Gregg Allman and more. The talented up-and-comer shows special promise and has plans to release a new album in the near future. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $12. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com  

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 – SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Damaged City Music Festival
Damaged City Music Festival’s is DC’s premiere hardcore punk rock festival. This annual festival draws punk lovers from around the world to the nation’s capital for a rockin’ good time. This year, the diverse lineup includes Despise You from L.A., Raw Brigade from Colombia, Rotten Mind from Sweden, Impulso from Italy and more. Various dates and times. Tickets $10-$60. Damaged City Music Festival: Various locations around DC; www.damaged-city.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 12

Robert Glasper Trio
Few musicians, if any, are in Robert Glasper’s category. Fusing an extensive command of jazz with his love of hip-hop and R&B, Glasper was always destined to become a visionary artist as a singer, expert pianist and producer. His unique musical background placed him in a world of his own, which did not go unnoticed by the industry. Glasper has been nominated for a Grammy six times, winning three. Working with artists across genres including Erykah Badu, Stevie Wonder, Norah Jones, Kendrick Lamar and Esperanza Spalding, Glasper’s brilliant artistry has garnered the respect of his peers. Show starts at 6 p.m., tickets $55-$70. City Winery: 1350 Okie St. NE, DC; www.citywinery.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 14

Los Lonely Boys
Chances are you’ve heard the song “Heaven” by Los Lonely Boys. The Chicano rock band is from Texas – and they sound like it. Steeped in their regional brand of blues with country rock overtones, Los Lonely Boys is literally a band of brothers. Despite several career setbacks in recent years, the Garza brothers always make positivity a priority by sharing their feel-good music with the world. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $40-$55. City Winery: 1350 Okie St. NE, DC; www.citywinery.com

Queen Latifah
Hip-hop legend and award-winning actress Queen Latifah will grace audiences with a performance in The Bridge Concert Series at the Kennedy Center. Latifah was a pioneer for women in hip-hop, creating a more inclusive space in what was and still is a male dominated genre. The Bridge Concert Series seeks to showcase the contributions black artist have made to American society. Show starts at 8 p.m. $59-$199. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

MONDAY, APRIL 15

Bad Suns
The Southern California rock band Bad Suns formed in 2012 and first gained popularity with their song “Cardiac Arrest.” Following the release of their new album Mystic Truth, the band will be kicking off their tour, traveling to cities throughout North America and Europe. Keep your eye out for this dynamic group – there’s just something about those Bad Suns. Doors at 7 p.m., tickets $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Terror Jr
American electro-pop duo Terror Jr came to prominence in when their single “3 Strikes” was featured in Kylie Jenner lip gloss commercial. With an apparent endorsement from the social media star, Terror Jr was thrust onto the scene early in their career. Their unapologetic, catchy pop tunes sustained the momentum and placed them prominently on the charts. Upon the release of their debut album Unfortunately, Terror Jr earlier this year, critics were surprised to find the group had gone political. Addressing heavy issues like reproductive rights, LGBTQ rights and substance abuse, Terror Jr is growing up and revealing all their dimensions. Show starts at 7 p.m., tickets $18. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

TUESDAY APRIL 16

The Dip
This soulful, swingin’ band will give you all the feels and leave you wondering why you’ve never heard of them before. Hailing from Seattle, The Dip gives you Motown vibes complete with a full horn section and a lead singer whose raspy, booming voice is simply beautiful. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $15-$30. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

Foals
Topping the U.K. charts with their album Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost Part 1, it’s safe to say Foals is making their mark at home. The English rock band – who managed to crossover with two albums on the Billboard 200 – is currently touring following the release of the first part of their double album.  Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost Part 2 is expected to drop this fall. Lead singer Yannis Philippakis described the first project as a prequel that ended in what felt “like a cliffhanger.” Doors at 7 p.m., tickets $38.50. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Spiritualized
What’s space rock, you say? Think The Dark Side of the Moon meets 21st century sensibilities. Want to hear it? Look no further than English rock band Spiritualized. Prepare to be transported to outer space where time no longer exists, and you’re left floating in the vast expanse of the universe. Trippy, right? Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $35. Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17

The National Symphony Orchestra Presents Beethoven’s Fifth: Fate Knocks!
The National Symphony Orchestra, led by Music Director Gianandrea Noseda, will perform Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 for music lovers at The Anthem. With a strict dedication to artistic excellence, the 96-member orchestra is unlikely to disappoint. If you enjoy the classics, this masterpiece is one you won’t want to miss. Show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets $15-$30. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 18

Method Man and Redman
It’s been 20 years since Method Man and Redman from the legendary hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan broke out as a duo and released their first album. Currently touring the country, the rappers will be stopping at Howard Theatre to perform classics from their repertoire. Show starts at 9 p.m., tickets $55-$65. Howard Theatre: 620 T St. NW, DC; www.thehowardtheatre.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 19

Adventure Club
Adventure Club is a Canadian dubstep duo who made the unusual transition from playing hardcore punk rock to light-hearted electronic dance, where they fit right in. They are best known for their hit remixes of Flight Facilities’ Crave You and Yuna’s Lullabies, which have 82 and 52 million views on YouTube, respectively. Show starts at 9 p.m., tickets $25-$35. Echostage: 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE, DC; www.echostage.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 23

Los Amigos Invisibles & Aterciopelados
Venezuelan band Los Amigos Invisibles blends funk, disco and pop with a distinctive Latin sound that makes you want to get up and dance. They are especially popular in their home country, where their music has been well-received since their debut album in 1995. Touring with Columbia’s top rock band duo Aterciopelados, this multicultural concert is sure to delight Spanish and English listeners alike. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $45-$50. The Howard Theatre: 620 T St. NW, DC; www.thehowardtheatre.com

WednesAY, APRIL 24

Emily Reo
Emily Reo’s newest album Only You Can See It is dropping in April. Her quirky sound falls somewhere between synth-pop and alternative, indie rock. Tunes like “Strawberry” and “Ghosting” from her new project have already created buzz, addressing the very topical issues of “ghosting” – the new-age term for suddenly ignoring someone – and toxic masculinity. Doors at 9 p.m., tickets $12. Comet Ping Pong: 5037 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.cometpingpong.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28

Cisco Adler
Grammy nominated producer and artist Cisco Adler is best known for his collaborations with rapper Shwayze. Their song “Corona and Lime” peaked at number #23 on the Billboard Hot 100 as one of the anthems of that era. After breaking out as a solo artist, Adler’s has settled into a smooth, alternative rock sound with reggae moods. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $17-$20. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

TUESDAY, APRIL 30

Julia Jacklin
If Joni Mitchell was reborn as a millennial, she would sound something like Julia Jacklin. The Australian native’s delicate, ethereal and distinctive voice is mesmerizing and memorable. Her second studio album released in January explores romantic relationships and self-reflection. The singer-songwriter said, “This album came from spending two years touring and being in a relationship and feeling like I never had any space of my own.” Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $15. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

Stage and Screen: April 2019

THROUGH SUNDAY APRIL 28

Mosaic Theater Company ‘s Native Son
The infamous streets of Southside Chicago set the scene in this dramatic, gripping production of Native Son. Adapted from Richard Wright’s legendary novel, Native Son tells the story of Bigger Thomas. When Bigger gets a well-paying job as a wealthy businessman’s driver, a series of unfortunate episodes lead to tragic consequences. With the original version set in the 1930s, this modern adaptation incidentally reveals the deep-rooted history of poverty in Chicago. Various dates and times. Tickets $20-$35. Atlas Performing Arts Center: 1333 H St. NE, DC; www.atlasarts.org

THROUGH SATURDAY, APRIL 20

The Peculiar Patriot
Liza Jessie Peterson was a teacher at the notorious Rikers Island prisons for 18 years. Inspired by her experiences, Peterson brings her one-woman show to the stage, exploring the effects of incarceration on communities and a broken system that perpetuates inequality. Her character Betsy LaQuanda Ross, a self-proclaimed “peculiar patriot,” makes frequent trips to penitentiaries, visiting her imprisoned family and friends in this funny and fiercely provocative show. Various dates and times. Tickets $14-$29. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: 641 D St. NW, DC; www.woollymammoth.net

SUNDAY, APRIL 7

The Sleeping Beauty
The famed Russian National Ballet is coming to the DMV, performing the timeless classic ballet The Sleeping Beauty. With choreography from ballet master Marius Petipa and compositions by the incomparable Tchaikovsky, this performance is sure to be a grand production. Founded in the late 1980s, the Russian National Ballet emerged in the Soviet transitional period of Perestroika. Ever since, the company has been dedicated to sharing its command of classic ballet with the world. Show starts at 2 p.m., tickets $34-$56. George Mason University Center for the Arts: 4373 Mason Pond Dr. Fairfax, VA; http://cfa.gmu.edu

TUESDAY, APRIL 9

Bob Saget
Few comedians have succeeded to crossover in the entertainment world as well as Bob Saget. Best known for his portrayal of Danny Tanner on ABC’s Full House, the versatile Saget has enjoyed an illustrious career. Nonetheless, he is and always was a comedian first. His stand-up is not what you would expect from America’s favorite dad – and with good reason: he’s not. Stepping out of the Full House shadow hasn’t been easy, but that’s exactly what Saget hopes to do in this not-so-family-friendly comedy performance. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $45. Sixth & I: 600 I St. NW, DC; www.sixthandi.org

SATURDAY, APRIL 13

Chelsea Handler
Known for her hilariously blunt delivery and bold blue humor, Chelsea Handler is switching it up for her upcoming Sit-Down Comedy Tour. Handler kicks off her tour in April with the release of her new memoir Life Will Be the Death of Me. In a rare display of vulnerability, she writes introspectively about childhood trauma, therapy, activism and more. The show will feature true stories from her book in an honest, stripped-down conversation. But don’t worry – her emotional anecdotes will only accompany the deeply inappropriate jokes audiences know and love her for. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets $85-$145. Warner Theatre: 513 13th St. NW, DC; www.warnertheatredc.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 – MONDAY, APRIL 29

The Who’s Tommy
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of The Who’s legendary debut album, The Kennedy Center’s Broadway Center Stage presents rock musical The Who’s Tommy. Starring Riverdale’s Casey Cott, Tony Award winner Christian Borle and Hamilton’s Mandy Gonzalez, the incredibly talented cast is not likely to disappoint. This semi-staged concert production boasts music and lyrics by The Who’s own Pete Townshend. Various dates and times. Tickets $69-$219. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 – THURSDAY, JUNE 2

Jubilee
From acclaimed playwright and director Tazewell Thompson comes an inspirational tribute performance based on the world-famous Fisk Jubilee Singers. The renowned African American acapella group broke enormous racial barriers in the late 19th century, funding the education of newly freed slaves and performing across the globe. The performance includes popular spirituals like “Wade in the Water,” “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” and “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen.” Various dates and times. Tickets $76-$125. Arena Stage: 1101 6th St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26

Spunk
Based on three short stories by Harlem Renaissance author Zora Neale Hurston and adapted by Tony Award winner George C. Wolfe, Spunk combines elements of storytelling, music and dance. This lively production promises to entertain audiences with spirited characters and tales of love, jealousy and revenge. Set in the countryside, Spunk also depicts the African American experience in the early 20th century. Various dates and times. Tickets $40-$85. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

Stage and Screen: March 2019

THROUGH SUNDAY, MARCH 24

Blood at the Root
Blood at the Root is the story of what happens when a black student chooses to occupy a primarily white space in her high school, driving hate, violence and chaos among her classmates. The play, inspired by the Jena Six court case in Louisiana, examines the link between bias, justice and identity and asks audiences to consider what is lost when implicit biases shape our view of – and adherence to – justice. Written by Dominique Morisseau, the play is described as moving, lyrical and bold. Various dates and times. Tickets $40. The Anacostia Playhouse: 2020 Shannon Pl. SE, DC; www.anacostiaplayhouse.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 – SUNDAY, APRIL 14

JQA
The latest offering from award-winning playwright Aaron Posner, JQA is an imaginative and thought-provoking story that illustrates conversations between John Quincy Adams, who was known for his integrity, statesmanship and arrogance, with other American leaders including Frederick Douglass, Andrew Jackson and his own father John Adams. Described as provocative, haunting and hilarious, JQA received an Edgerton Foundation New Play Award. Various dates and times. Tickets $92-$115. Arena Stage: 1101 6th St. NW, DC; www.arenastage.org

MONDAY, MARCH 4 – SUNDAY, MARCH 24

Confection
The newest offering from New York-based Third Rail Projects is an immersive, multisensory dance and theatre performance staged throughout the Folger Reading Rooms. Inspired by the richness of the Folger Library and the lavishness of the 17th-century aristocracy, the performance examines the power of appetite and desire. Directed by Zach Morris and Jennine Willett, Confection is a story of opulence and consumption that not only invites audiences into the Folger’s magnificent Reading Rooms, but also invites them to enjoy bite-sized treats made by local pâtissiers. Various dates and times. Tickets $40-$60. Folger Shakespeare Library: 201 E Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 – WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

Into the Woods
Ford Theatre’s Into the Woods is a darkly funny reimagining of several beloved fairy tales from the minds of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine. The play follows a baker and his wife on a quest to break a witch’s curse, which leads them into the woods where they cross paths with timeless characters like Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and a pair of lovelorn princes. The play has won Tony Awards for score and script, and this Peter Flynn-directed rendition promises to inspire both laughs and introspection. Various dates and times. Tickets $28-$81. Ford’s Theatre: 511 10th St. NW, DC; www.fords.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 – SATURDAY, APRIL 6

Hands on a Hardbody
Featuring a score by Amanda Green and Phish’s Trey Anastasio, Hands on a Hardbody tells the story of 10 Texans competing to win a new truck. The contest is hilarious and hard-fought, and characters learn that perseverance, determination and hope can lead them to their American Dream. The play has been described as a quintessential American musical, and features a diverse cast of characters highlighting the intersectionality of the American identity. Set to a score featuring blues, country and R&B, Hands on a Hardbody is a quirky play that promises to enliven the District in its regional premiere. Various dates and times. Tickets $62. Keegan Theatre: 1742 Church St. NW, DC; www.keegantheatre.com

TUESDAY, MARCH 14 – SUNDAY, MARCH 24

The National Geographic Society Environmental Film Festival
The Environmental Film Festival returns to the District for its 27th year. Sponsored by National Geographic, featured films tackle important environmental issues like overfishing and climate change in addition to presenting visually stunning tales of adventure like the Academy Award-nominated Free Solo, which follows Alex Honnold’s free climb of Yosemite’s El Capitan. The festival includes 11 days of documentary film screenings at more than 25 venues. Details on the films, schedule and tickets are available online. Tickets $12. Times and locations vary. National Geographic Society Environmental Film Festival: Various locations in DC; www.DCeff.org

MONDAY, MARCH 25

Bon Iver & TU Dance’s Come Through
In the first event of the Kennedy Center’s DIRECT CURRENT season highlighting contemporary culture, Bon Iver and TU Dance’s collaboration Come Through fuses genres and mediums. Over a soundtrack featuring new music from two-time Grammy winner Justin Vernon of Bon Iver, nine-member dance troupe TU Dance will mix varied styles such as classical ballet and modern dance. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $49. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 – SUNDAY, MARCH 31

A Bronx Tale
Directed by Robert De Niro and Jerry Zaks, A Bronx Tale has been described as Jersey Boys meets West Side Story. Set in 1960s New York, the musical tells the story of a young man who must choose between his father’s love and his ambition to be a “made man” in the mafia. The score is comprised of 60s-era doo-wop, and the play contains several ensemble dance numbers. A Bronx Tale features numerous actors and actresses from its time on Broadway, and offers audiences opportunities to laugh, cry and tap their feet. Various dates and times. Tickets $54-$99. National Theatre: 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.thenationaldc.org

Photo: Daniel Lempres

What’s On Tap: ANXO cidery & PintXos Bar’s Rachel Fitz Celebrates Women in Food and Drink

When ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar opened in Truxton Circle, they were the only sit-down restaurant in the neighborhood. Co-owner Rachel Fitz says the grid couldn’t handle a business of ANXO’s size – her team had to increase power and water for the entire neighborhood – but it was important for them to operate in the District and support the local community. A former social worker, Fitz’s commitment to community engagement has translated to her role at ANXO. After the resounding success of the cidery’s collaboration with Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington on International Women’s Day last year, Fitz decided to extend and expand ANXO’s celebration of women. For Women’s Month 2019, ANXO is featuring women in the industry throughout March at special events, and everything poured at the cidery is provided by women-owned or women-run breweries. Plus, happy hour profits for the entire month are going to DC’s Planned Parenthood office.

On Tap: Tell me about your introduction to cider, and your path to opening ANXO.
Rachel Fitz:
My business partners and I traveled around Spain and fell in love with cider. I thought, “Who knew there was all this cider in the world that’s not sweet and is interesting?” We all come from a beer background and really fell in love with cider. The idea when we opened was to start as a cider bar and do a small amount of production, mostly what comes out of the barrel downstairs – that’s our sidra. [Cider] is the original beverage of the United States. We’re really just getting back to our roots, no pun intended.

OT: What exactly did ANXO do last year for International Women’s Day?
RF:
We decided to highlight female producers. We thought it was going to be a small-scale fundraiser [for Planned Parenthood], but we were blown away by the positive support from attendees and those featured. We had no idea these companies had women running or owning them. It got us thinking about how many other women there are doing amazing things, and how women are rarely in the spotlight.

OT: What inspired the longer celebration this year?
RF:
[Last year] was a huge success. We raised over $2,600 in one night and wanted to grow it, so we decided, “Why not do an entire month of celebrating?” We decided to pour only products made or owned by women. With 36 draft lines, plus liquor, wine and nonalcoholic beverages, we went into it thinking it would be challenging. Turns out, there are a ton of female producers. Every day, we come across new options.

OT: Are you doing collaborations with other brewers as well?
RF:
We did two collaborations: a brut IPA with Denizens and a cider with Eden out of Vermont called Nevertheless We Persisted. [The cider] will be released on International Women’s Day. This is the first year of doing a month-long collaboration, and we hope to do it again next year and get other places doing this. It would be great if in the District, everybody was highlighting amazing women in the industry.

OT: Why do you think it’s important to not only highlight women in the industry, but also create a space for them to connect?
RF:
I think a lot of the time there is not a comfortable space to ask questions that would really help you as a young professional. It’s hard to go up to somebody who is very established in the industry and say, “I want to make more money” or ask, “How do I get to where you are?” I wanted to create an environment where people are comfortable [doing] that, and to learn from people who have already been through that.

OT: What would you say to women interested in the cider industry who worry it’s a boys’ club?

RF: Tom Oliver, a famous U.K. cidermaker, says he firmly believes that women are going to be the future of cider. A lot of people think cider is a female beverage – it’s certainly not. But women have a lot of say in the market: in the products that are being produced, in the way that they’re presented. Women have a very powerful voice, and it’s great to see women who are growing trees, orcharding and also making cider. There are no limitations.

ANXO is exclusively pouring products from women-owned or operated breweries and distilleries for the entire month of March at their Truxton Circle location. Specifics on their other Women’s Month events are available at www.anxodc.com/womensmonth

ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; 202-986-3795; www.anxodc.com


Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

SUNDAY, MARCH 4

Women’s Month Collaboration Dinner
A group of female chefs will be taking over ANXO’s kitchen including award-winning women like Ilma Lopez, Cagla Onal and Amy Morgan. The four-course menu will be paired with ciders and wines made by women in the industry. 7 p.m. Tickets $97.50. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 7

Beer & Donuts
With three taps, board games and donuts, Arlington’s Sugar Shack is the place to be on Thursday nights. Taps will pour the latest offerings from Right Proper Brewing Company; tap takeover nights always feature local craft brewers, donuts and a variety of board games. 4-9 p.m. Admission is free. Sugar Shack Donuts & Coffee: 1014 South Glebe Rd. Arlington, VA; www.sugarshackdonuts.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 8

ANXO’s International Women’s Day Celebration
For the entire month of March, ANXO will donate happy hour profits to the local Planned Parenthood. On Women’s Day, Elanor Leger of Eden Specialty Ciders will be at ANXO, women’s month T-shirts will be available and ANXO’s newest collaboration with Eden will be available in cans. 5 p.m. Admission is free. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

Cheers & Namaste
There’s no better way to spend a Saturday morning than enjoying a flight of local beer and doing some yoga. Classes at Right Proper’s Brookland location include a flight of house favorites and an hour of yoga suitable for any experience level. Don’t forget your mat. 12-1 p.m. Tickets $15.  Right Proper Brewing Company Production House and Tasting Room: 920 Girard St. NE, DC; www.rightproperbrewing.com

DC Brewers’ Guild HopFest
The DC Brewers’ Guild is throwing its ninth annual HopFest hosted by DC Brau. The event is an opportunity to sample some of the hoppiest brews from the area’s best brewers. Beer offerings will include community favorites alongside unique HopFest creations and rare brews. Tickets include a special DC Brewers’ Guild glass and unlimited pours. 1-5 p.m. Tickets start at $35. DC Brau: 3178 Bladensburg Rd. NE, DC; www.dcbg.org

SUNDAY, MARCH 10

Records, Beer and BBQ
The only thing better than crate-digging is doing so with a fresh pint in hand. Join Hellbender Brewing for a record swap/sale in the tasting room featuring barbecue courtesy of Smoke and Ember BBQ. 12-5 p.m. Admission is free. Hellbender Brewing Company Tasting Room: 5788 2nd St. NE, DC; www.hellbenderbeer.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13

De Dolle Vintage Flight Night
De Dolle’s Belgian strong ales are world-renowned for their bold flavors. Many of De Dolle’s offerings age exceptionally well and thrive when barreled, though the brewery is also known for blending maltiness and acidity in its pale ales and sours. The Sovereign will offer 15 different De Dolle beers and four different vintage flights. 5-11:30 p.m. Admission is free. The Sovereign DC: 1206 Wisconsin Ave. NW, DC; www.thesovereigndc.com

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20

D&V International Beer Dinner
Enjoy fine dining and European beer pairings in the style of the Trappist monks of Belgium. Learn about featured breweries from a Belgian beer expert and taste a variety of beers in the style, many imported specifically for this event, after dinner. 7-10 p.m. Tickets $60. Granville Moore’s: 1238 H St. NE, DC; www.granvillemoores.com    

Visiting Cidery: Wild Hare Ciders
Brewed in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains with heritage apples grown in the Shenandoah Valley, Wild Hare Cidery excels at apple-only as well as botanical and other fruit-infused ciders. Tickets include a guided tasting of several Wild Hare offerings including limited releases. 7-10 p.m. Tickets $10. Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 21

Southwest Neighborhood Happy Hour
The tap room at Union Stage invites locals to enjoy happy hour specials and mingle with other folks from the neighborhood. Union Stage features an extensive liquor list, 16 taps and house-made pizzas. 5 p.m. Admission is free. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 23

Peche Mortel Day
Shipped from Montreal’s Dieu Du Ciel brewpub, Peche Mortel is a standout imperial coffee stout known the world over. To celebrate their 2019 releases, Dieu Du Ciel shares special variants of its famous stout with brewpubs all around the world, including ChurchKey. This year’s offerings include seven variants of the imperial stout, some of which are aged in bourbon or whiskey barrels and finished with an array of ingredients including cherries, coffee and toasted coconut. 12 p.m. Admission is free. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 30

ANXO’s Women’s Month Close-Out Party
Join ANXO in celebrating the end of a successful Women’s Month. The closeout is a comedy brunch, marking the first time a comedian has performed in ANXO’s dining room. Tickets are available both with and without drink pairings. Showings at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Tickets $40-$65. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

Spring BrewFest
BrewFest promises a day of craft beer, live music, food and more. The event will feature a variety of popular local craft beers, as well as a preview of local 2019 offerings. Virginia wineries and distilleries will also be pouring. 11-5 p.m. Tickets $10-$50. Fredericksburg Fairgrounds: 2400 Airport Ave. Fredericksburg, VA; www.fredbrewfest.com

Music Picks: Winter 2019

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

El Ten Eleven
El Ten Eleven is one of those bandsm, that to the naked eye, defies sonic law. The duo makes dizzying, lush sounds using only a double-neck bass guitar and foot pedals. I know what you’re thinking: “Yeah, but they have a laptop, right? Everyone does that nowadays.” No, they do not have a laptop. Everything’s organic, as it has been for the band’s entire 10-album career. In an era where everything is prerecorded and premeditated, this kind of musicianship is even more impressive. Don’t miss the duo in action this winter. Doors 8 p.m. Tickets start at $17. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7

Martha Afework
Homegrown Martha Afework is proof that just because you fall in love with something as a child, that doesn’t mean you should give it up as an adult. Singing since the age of four, Afework has used her talents – and more recently, social media – to gain attention from people in the area. Now, the soulful R&B singer will headline the Fillmore without looking back. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $15. Fillmore Silver Spring: 8656 Colesville Rd. Silver Spring, MD; www.fillmoresilverspring.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8

COIN
COIN isn’t necessarily the most innovative band on the block, but there’s something extremely likeable about their radio-friendly brand of indie pop. I can think of many artists before them  made a similar type of music who were much easier to write off as unoriginal. Perhaps it’s their vulnerability – the Nashville-based, four-piece band often sings of awkward romantic encounters, leaving home and growing up. Ah, youth. No matter what it is, COIN’s undeniable magnetism makes them worth seeing live. Doors at 6 p.m. Tickets $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11

Eyelids
Chances are you’ve heard some lyrics that the members of Eyelids are responsible for, but maybe not of the band itself. The Portland, Oregon-based group has penned songs for The Decemberists, Elliott Smith and Stephen Malkmus, among others. Now on tour for their own songs in the form of release Maybe More, the indie rockers are ready to step out from the shadows of their legendary collaborators to make you hum and sing along to their work. Show at 9 p.m. Tickets $12-$14. Comet Ping Pong: 5037 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.cometpingpong.com

Panda Bear
Though I wish I was writing about an actual panda bear who belted out lyrics about life in the jungle, you and I will have to settle on the very talented Noah Lennox. A founding member of experimental pop band Animal Collective, his own music as Panda Bear doesn’t stray far from the fabric of the aforementioned band. Looking for meticulously crafted electronic sounds? Check. What about vocals layered atop these very eclectic beats? Check. Basically, if you’re a fan of the entire collective, Panda Bear’s music will be right up your wheelhouse. Check out M.K. Koszycki’s interview with Lennox at www.ontaponline.com. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13

Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness
Ever wonder what those bands you listened to during your teenage years sound like when they grow past their angst-fueled music? That’s what Andrew McMahon sounds like these days, as the former band member of several California-based groups has  grown into a more mature musician. The pianist has harnessed his high-pitched voice into one of reason, discussing the topics of nostalgia, missed opportunities and failures with a joyful tone throughout his latest release Upside Down Flowers. Doors at 6 p.m. Tickets $40.50. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Cherry Glazerr
L.A.-based trio Cherry Glazerr is known for their commentary on the world at large – after all, the band takes its name from NPR reporter Chery Glaser – but on their third record, they’ve teased a new era. Singer Clementine Creevy has indicated in press for their new album Stuffed & Ready that she’s begun to look inward for inspiration and it’s evident on the band’s lead single “Daddi,” which seems to reflect on the gray areas of attraction, control and power dynamics in relationships. The infectious song is a sure indication that the band’s new era will be an impressive one, too. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets $20. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

Current Joys
The solo project of Nicholas Rattigan, Current Joys is a moody singalong about the creative process. From extreme highs to lows, Rattigan rattles off emotional lyrics that are accompanied by thud-like guitar strums, each delivered with a purpose. A Different Age represents one of the most expressive and well-crafted albums you’ll hear this year. Doors at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $15. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Beirut
Worldly wunderkind Zach Condon announced his band Beirut’s fifth album and lead single Gallipolli in the most Beirut way possible. He took to his band’s website to write a letter about the genesis of the album’s title track, which involved the band “stumbling into the medieval, fortressed island town of Gallipoli one night and following a brass band procession fronted by priests carrying a statue of the town’s saint through the winding, narrow streets.” The band has served as a musical passport to Condon’s travels since they formed back in 2006, and they’ll bring their sounds to DC this winter with new adventures in tow. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $41. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

The Parrots
Hailing from Madrid, The Parrots combine both Spanish and English lyrics to make a near-universal indie sound. Backed by guitar licks reminiscent of Chastity Belt or Courtney Barnett, their music is moody and their vocals provide a melodic whine. Though they haven’t recorded a new album since 2016, The Parrots has been releasing well-received singles since then and promise to bring an electric show to DC9. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $12. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15

Chuck Prophet
The latest release in Prophet’s discography is Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins, a concept album paying homage to the legendary artist responsible for “I Fought the Law,” made famous by The Clash. The album is gritty and fun, and I’m glad Prophet hasn’t wiped the slate clean quite yet but instead, is focusing on spreading his version of “California noir.” Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $20. Jammin Java: 227 Maple Ave. E. Vienna, VA; www.jamminjava.com

Gregory Porter
There are few better gifts for a Valentine than to see the wonderous Gregory Porter. His music is smooth and loving, borrowing vibes and emotions from 50s and 60s jazz – not to mention his sultry vocals. With his baritone contrasting with several backing instruments, Porter delivers songs perfect for a date night with your significant other. Show at 8 p.m. Tickets $58-$108. The Music Center at Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org

Metric
Fusing indie with synth-pop, Canadian band Metric is set to visit the DMV this month. Touring on the back of their 2018 release Art of Doubt, the album brings out the best elements of the band. Aided by a radical energy in the band’s instrumentation, frontwoman Emily Haines continues to provide a lens into her creative process while delivering her seamlessly effortless vocal talents in each song. Doors at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Tickets $38. Fillmore Silver Spring: 8656 Colesville Rd. Silver Spring, MD; www.fillmoresilverspring.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Dante Pope
I used to wonder why old school R&B music was so hard to replicate for newer artists. Obviously, the genre still has a foothold on the popular conscience as you can hear it in movies or in samples for hip-hop, but there is largely a dearth of new artists with this style. Leon Bridges took hold of it as a notable vocalist to mention, but one on the rise is Dante Pope. The multi-instrumentalist has pipes channeling the 70s, and his ability to strum the guitar only heightens his deft musicianship. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $15-$17. Songbyrd Record Cafe and Music House: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Dante Elephante
With an indie sound combining garage and surf, this group of four offers very enjoyable tunes to groove to. Whether you’re driving down a highway or jam-packed in the tiny, intimate DC9, these songs will carry you through. The lyrics come across as playful even when serious, and this isn’t a criticism because sometimes it’s helpful to laugh in the face of tough times. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $10. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

Daughters
Back on the punk scene for the first time since 2010, Daughters returned with their 2018 release You Won’t Get What You Want. While everything about the group is punk, their pace is very deliberate compared to the break-neck speed the genre’s bands usually play at. Instead, Daughters is a manic deliberation with chants for choruses. Plus, some of their music sounds like something you might hear in a horror film’s score. Doors at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

The Knocks
Chances are at least one of your favorite pop artists has collaborated with New York production duo The Knocks. Carly Rae Jepsen, Foster the People, Sofi Tukker and X Ambassadors are just a few of the big names who have lent their vocal talent to the pair’s upbeat songs. To celebrate the release of their new album New York Narcotic, they’ll bring a full-fledged dance party to U Street. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18

Empress Of
Lorely Rodriguez has released countless synth-pop gems under the name Empress Of since 2012. You may also know her from standout spots providing her signature crystal clear vocals on albums by contemporaries like Dirty Projectors, Khalid, MØ and more. As her career progressed, so did her vocal and production prowess, giving us last year’s catchy album Us. Her earlier work sounds just as good today as it did upon release, and her single “Go to Hell” is the ultimate kiss-off to everyone who didn’t believe in Rodriguez – and it’s my go-to pick me up song when feeling discouraged. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19

Jacob Banks
You can’t mention Jacob Banks without mentioning the word soul. The Nigerian-born, British singer-songwriter is downright gripping when he steps in front of a microphone. From a grumble to a shout – all on key – this man has some serious range and versatility. His latest release, 2018’s Village, provides a perfect showcase for his talents – and he uses all of them to mystify listeners. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets $20. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Julia Holter
Though Julia Holter sings, the classification of composer feels most natural when describing the artist’s musical stylings. Layered with wind instruments, drums and electronic sounds, her songs are absolutely packed with instrumentation – and the apparatus serving as the conductor’s baton is her voice. Whether it’s whiny, melodic or on the verge of shouting, her vocals provide the direction for all of the carefully curated sounds to follow. Show at 7 p.m. Tickets $17. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20

Anderson .Paak
In an era of rap and hip-hop where nearly all artists are singing their own choruses, it’s interesting to see the pendulum swing. Anderson .Paak represents a lyricist who has the same cadence and rhyming skills as a hip-hop artist, but with real pipes. This style is extremely fun to listen to and seems like it’s even more satisfying to make, as he frequently features rap giants like Kendrick Lamar, Pusha T and Dr. Dre. With his raspy delivery and West Coast cool, Anderson .Paak is as unique as they come. Show at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $78. The Theater at MGM National Harbor: 101 MGM National Ave. Oxon Hill, MD; www.mgmnationalharbor.com

MNEK
It’s my humble opinion that MNEK should be one of the biggest pop stars in the world, and chances are the London-based artist has written or produced a song for one of your favorites. After all, the 24-year-old’s resume includes work for Beyoncé, Bastille, Stormzy and Diplo. I could go on, but you get the idea. And as I’m sure you’ve guessed, his solo work is just as impressive as the people he’s worked with. On the heels of his fantastic full-length album Language and countless impressive collaborations over the years, he’ll bring his innovative brand of pop to DC. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $17. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21

James Blake
Rumors of James Blake’s new album have been swirling around the web as of late. He released two new singles last year and appeared on the Black Panther soundtrack but now, the world is ready for a new full-length album. If the rumors are true, the timing is perfect as he’ll hit DC in late February – hopefully with new tunes in tow. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets $48.50. The Anthem: 901 Wharf St. SW, DC; www.theanthemdc.com

Liz Cooper & The Stampede
Liz Cooper offers tremendous energy and a vibrant, upbeat demeanor on her latest record Window Flowers, the result of a yearlong effort to do something creative every day. Her style of sing-talking with a raspy delivery allows her to mix it up with each song, sometimes holding onto notes for a little longer than you’d expect – and sometimes letting them go with a breath. Doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Tickets $12-$15. Songbyrd Record Cafe and Music House: 2475 18th St. NW, DC; www.songbyrddc.com

FRIDAY, FEBURARY 22

Kat Wright
If you’re in the mood for a retro sound this winter, look no further than Kat Wright. The almost lo-fi production of her music sends you back in time, as her vocals help paint the picture of a nostalgic view. Her powerful vocals are accompanied by backing bass, drums, keys and a powerful three-piece horn section. While she may not provide a visual aesthetic of the jazz singer smoking a cigarette, her more modern stage presence will more than make up for it. Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $12-$17. The Hamilton LIVE: 600 14th St. NW, DC; www.thehamiltondc.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23

The Suffers
Hailing from Houston, Texas, this eight-member band provides soul and R&B sensibilities with a pop music mentality. I say that because every song is jovial and enjoyable. With eight members, the band also has tremendous versatility, bouncing from sound to sound. The Suffers are led by vocalist Kam Franklin, who provides a powerful voice for the instruments to follow. Show at 7 p.m. Tickets $20. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

Vince Staples
If Kendrick Lamar is the current king of hip-hop, Vince Staples is the prince. One of the best lyricists in the genre, Staples has zigged while others have zagged – providing breathtaking commentary on the world as he sees it. Though not every song has a political point of view, the best tunes are when he’s locked in on a subject for the world to hear. Doors at 8 p.m. Tickets $35. 9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com

Washington Performing Arts Presents Lara Downes
Inspired by Georgia O’Keefe’s words, the trailblazing, NPR chart-topping Lara Downes has channeled her prodigious creativity into an intimate program of solo and ensemble works paying tribute to female composers and poets, both past and present. Her special guest is multi-instrumentalist/composer/singer and MacArthur “Genius” Award winner Rhiannon Giddens, who, through her own work and performances as a member of the Grammy-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, embodies precisely the ethos Downes had in mind. Downes’ performance is a special presentation by Washington Performing Arts. Show at 8 p.m. Tickets $35. Writeup provided by venue. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue: 600 I St. NW, DC; www.sixthandi.org

Western Den
Deni Hlavinka and Chris West met on a college forum after Hlavinka posted an idea for a song. The next day, West sent over a completed version and the serendipitous partnership has been unstoppable ever since. In Western Den, the pair focuses on melodic folk music – but instead of a heavy emphasis on guitar strums, their music shines a light on Hlavinka’s piano skills. Doors at 8:30 p.m., show at 9 p.m. Tickets $12. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28

Vundabar
Despite their most recent release meditating on illness and death, Boston’s Vundabar has been called “a ceaselessly jovial band” by Pitchfork, and their live shows are no exception. The contrast between the band’s existential, contemplative and sometimes downright depressing material paired with their jangly garage rock-influenced music makes the perfect pairing for those of us who love to dance but also contemplate life’s trickier questions. Bring that marriage to a live show and you’ve got a performance that’s equal parts a party and a therapy session. Doors at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $15. Rock & Roll Hotel: 1353 H St. NE, DC; www.rockandrollhoteldc.com

Stage and Screen: Winter 2019

THROUGH SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9

The Baltimore Waltz
It’s hard to blame someone diagnosed with the fictional “Acquired Toilet Disease” from going all out in the pleasures of the skin. With the fatal illness starting the timer leading to her impending doom, unmarried school teacher Anna heads to Europe with her brother Carl so she can live a little – complete with lots of food and sex. Meanwhile, Carl becomes entrenched in a bizarre espionage scheme meant to discover a cure for his not-long-for-this-world sister. You might be wondering, “Why did you mention a trip to Europe when Baltimore is mentioned in the title?” Well, about that… Various dates and times. Tickets $50. Keegan Theatre: 1742 Church St. NW, DC; www.keegantheatre.com

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10

Nell Gwynn
Coming from humble beginnings, an orange seller eventually finds her way to the stage where she immediately becomes a household name. Upon Nell Gwynn’s successes, she manages to make a fan out of King Charles II. Eventually, the royal leader of England brings Gwynn to court as a favorite mistress. From there, the story about this amazing woman takes off. Various dates and times. Tickets $42-$79. Folger Theatre: 201 E Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 – SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Shame
An adaptation of a documentary may not seem all that enthralling at first. However, the subject matter of Mosaic Theater Company’s Shame is more than enough to draw you in as it tackles the challenges facing Israelis and Palestinians who choose to work with one another despite significant hurdles. The story focuses on several examples of this predicament and integrates several mediums, including Facebook messages, tweets and telephoned threats. Various dates and times. Tickets $15-$35. Atlas Performing Arts Center: 1333 H St. NE, DC; www.atlasarts.org

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

BLKS
Spurred by a scare, Octavia decides it’s time to forget about any troubles or trepidations and have a raucous night on the town with friends. Joined by companions June and Imani, the three depart into the city for an epic night. But the evening becomes more than a hardcore party session, as the trio encounter strange characters, outrageous events and endure a true test of their friendship. Poet and playwright Aziza Barnes wrote this play, which celebrates queerness and sisterhood as the friends wrestle with universal factors such as truth, love and the struggle of adulthood. Various dates and times. Tickets $20-$51. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: 641 D St. NW, DC; www.woollymammoth.net

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 – SUNDAY, MARCH 10

Richard the Third
Power as an addiction is not only a trope in real life, but a common theme for villains in a number of stories – and perhaps the most famous is the power-hungry king from Shakespeare’s Richard III. Fueled by a bottomless well of ambition, the ruthless and cunning man continues to reach for more, more and more in his quest for power. By the play’s end, no one in the audience will be rooting for his lust. This is the study of what makes a villain, and few put on better performances than Shakespeare Theatre Company (STC). Various dates and times. Tickets $44-$102. STC’s Sidney Harman Hall: 610 F St. NW, DC; www.shakespearetheatre.org

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

El Viejo, El Joven y El Mar (The Old Man, The Youth, and The Sea)
A new play by Irma Correa, El Viejo, El Joven y El Mar tells the story of a renowned Spanish philosopher who runs into a fisherman, general and journalist. He speaks with each of them about their different beliefs regarding freedom, reason and faith; all the while, the old man is planning his escape from the Spanish island of Fuerteventura. Though the play is based on historical events, the subtext is heavily rooted in today’s society. The play is in Spanish with English subtitles. Various dates and times. Tickets $48. GALA Hispanic Theatre: 3333 14th St. NW, DC; http://en.galatheatre.org

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Story District’s Sucker for Love: A Valentine’s Day Special
No need to get mushy on Valentine’s Day when you can laugh at the misery of others, right? Okay, admittedly that sentence was a little Seinfeld-ish, but on the day dedicated to love, heart drawings and chocolates, Story District’s Sucker for Love provides an alternate mode of entertainment. Instead of a candlelit dinner with expensive wine, head to Lincoln Theatre to hear true stories involving sex, love, breakups, makeups, dating and anything else you can fit into the genre of Valentine’s Day. Show starts at 7 p.m., tickets $35-$45. Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.storydistrict.org

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 – SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Urban Bush Women’s Hair & Other Stories
Through personal narratives crafted in living rooms, communities and kitchens, Hair & Other Stories is dance theatre that blends conversations with movement to challenge existing – and sometime archaic – American values. The Urban Bush Women company is always on the cutting edge of delivering pieces that fit within the contemporary dance genre while also highlighting the cultural history and spiritual traditions of the African-American and African diaspora. Saturday night opening party starts at 8 p.m. Sunday afternoon performance starts at 4 p.m. Tickets $15-$100. Dance Place: 3225 8th St. NE, DC; www.danceplace.org

30 Days of DC Music

In honor of our local music issue, we present DC musicians, both well-established and on the rise, who make the city’s music scene stand out. To check out these tastemakers for yourself, listen to our 30 Days of DC Music playlist on Spotify – you might even find your new favorite artist.

AV

April + VISTA
This genre-bending DC duo recently opened for Swedish electropop icons Little Dragon during their sold-out, two-night run at H Street’s Rock & Roll Hotel last month, and stole the show with their live versions of recent releases and a cover of Radiohead’s “Pyramid Song.” They’ll continue to captivate stages while supporting like-minded acts Kllo and The JujuExchange, but be sure to listen to their spectacular EP You Are Here in the meantime. Visit www.aprilandvista.com for more.

BM

Bad Moves
Bad Moves are doing big things. Four DC natives with very DC day jobs joined forces to lend their incredible talent to make one of 2018’s most exciting records. Their music is cheerful, their subject matter relatable and their lyrics are seemingly handcrafted to make a live karaoke session at their shows a reality – Tell No One is practically perfect. They recently celebrated the release of the album at Black Cat in September, and I’m already eagerly awaiting new music from them while keeping this album on heavy rotation. Follow them on Twitter @BadMovesDC for more.

BU

Bottled Up
This DC band’s M.O. is surf rock with a soul, and an ever so slight nod to punk predecessors who occupied hallowed DC venues before them. While their lyrics deal with deeply personal matters – addictions, anxieties and general malaise – it’s clearly an outlet with which they heal and offer joy to others. Their boisterous guitars and penchant for peppering in “la la las” at the perfect moment will have you singing along in no time. No stranger to the myriad of venues on the local music circuit, they’ll be at DC9 on November 14. Visit www.bottledup.bandcamp.com for more. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW; www.dc9.club

BRNDA

BRNDA
Babe City Records-signed BRNDA make jarring, frenetic indie rock akin to Black Lips and Thee Oh Sees. Their short but impactful Thanks for Playing EP clocks in at 18 minutes but stays with you for much longer. The best part of BRNDA? Every member of the quartet contributes to vocals, evoking a fun call-and-response vibe that will have you singing along too. See them live at The Dougout on November 5. $5-$10 suggested donation for entry. Visit http://brendatheband.com for more. The Dougout: 1498 Douglas St. NE, DC; www.facebook.com/thedougoutdc

CC

Cautious Clay
While the musician, also known as Joshua Karpeh, may be a New Yorker now, his stint in the District as a George Washington University student gives him the right to say he’s part of the DC scene. Following a critically acclaimed EP, he sold out a show this past May and stood out as one of the highlights of this year’s All Things Go Fall Classic. The performance included Karpeh singing, and playing the saxophone and flute onstage. Unfortunately, you must wait until early next year to see him live in DC – he’ll take the U Street Music Hall stage on February 1 – but it will be worth the wait. Visit www.cautiousclay.com for more. U Street Music Hall: 1115 U St. NW, DC; www.ustreetmusichall.com

CG

Chain & the Gang
“Hey you want to check it out/ this experimental music they’re talking about?” Ian “Chain” Svenonious asks his listeners in the titular track of Experimental Music, the band’s late 2017 release for DC’s Dischord Records. If your answer to that question is yes, Svenonious and company are ready to take you on a journey. With influences from 50s-style surf rock to DC punk, and many genres in between, the track is both on the nose and a statement of the band’s ethos from their many years of making music. While Svenonious has been hard at work with one of his many other projects – Escape-ism – Chain & the Gang remain one of the most exciting and unexpected bands to grace the streets of DC. Visit www.dischord.com/band/chain-and-the-gang for more.

DC

Dreamcast
This project takes its name from the old school gaming console and borrows nostalgic sounds to make something totally new, courtesy of Davon Bryant. The DC native is a singer, songwriter, producer and drummer who makes extremely groovy tunes with retro sensibilities, but modern production flair. This fall, he released the spectacular jams “Outer Space” and “Up 2 U.” Visit www.soundcloud.com/burymeinamink for more.

FLA

Flasher
DC post punk fans rejoice. One of the most exciting bands in the genre right now is one of our own. Their June release for Domino Records, Constant Image, is heavily featured on my “Best of 2018” list. Flasher recently shared the stage with the iconic Breeders and will return to their hometown on November 30 at Black Cat. Follow the band on Twitter @ffflasher. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

FA

Foreign Air
Electropop outfit Foreign Air remains one of the hardest working duos in DC music. The smooth and spacious sounds of their 2016 EP For the Light catapulted them into the national music conversation. Their sounds have been featured in TV shows and commercials and for good reason – their brand of emotion and electronics is the stuff of a music supervisor’s dreams. To the excitement of many fans (myself included), their single “Turning” was released last month and will be included on Foreign Air’s first full-length album, to be released soon. Visit www.foreignair.net for more.

Gauche

Gauche
An amalgamation of members from Priests, Downtown Boys and various other DC musicians, this rotating cast of musicians is anchored by Jason Barnett, Mary Jane Regalado and Daniele Yandel. Their playful beach goth, a.k.a. surf rock with emotional lyrics, infused brand of rock provides the perfect platform for a rotating cast to meditate on ending relationships, independence and navigating existence in the online world. See them live on December 4 at Black Cat. Visit www.g-a-u-c-h-e.bandcamp.com for more. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com


SHAED

SHAED’s Chelsea Lee
SHAED is comprised of Chelsea Lee and twin brothers Max and Spencer Ernst. A favorite of the DC pop scene and beyond, their emotive electropop is perhaps best exemplified by their EP Melt, which came out this past September. We caught up with vocalist Chelsea Lee on what the band’s been up to lately.

On Tap: I know that you all met at a 9:30 Club show. Can you tell me a bit more about your origin story?
Chelsea Lee:
I was a solo artist and a friend suggested I go see this band, raving about these twin boys who were opening. It was Max and Spencer on stage playing an acoustic set. I was 15 and instantly fell in love. We started hanging out regularly after and became best friends. We couldn’t fully commit to a project together until SHAED.

OT: You’ve played a lot of DC venues – 9:30 Club, Union Stage, Rock & Roll Hotel – do you have a favorite? A place on your wish list?
CL:
We’ve toured a lot, and 9:30 Club remains one of our favorite venues in the country. We would love to play The Anthem.

OT: How has the DC music scene supported you as you’ve progressed in your career?
CL:
DC has been incredibly kind to us. We just played a sold out show and recognized so many people that have been coming to see us since the beginning. Fortunately, the scene here is growing and some great music is coming out of the DMV.

OT: You recently released an EP. Any plans to release a full album soon?
CL:
Right now we’re focusing on writing. For now we just want to keep creating music and see what happens.

OT: Anyone from the DC music scene you’d really like to work with?
CL:
April + VISTA and GoldLink.

OT: Do you have any upcoming shows in the area?
CL:
We’re playing the 9:30 Club with St. Lucia on November 6.

SHAED opens for St. Lucia at the 9:30 Club on Tuesday, November 6. Tickets are $32.50. Doors at 7 p.m. Visit www.shaedband.com for more.

9:30 Club: 815 V St. NW, DC; www.930.com


GEMS

GEMS
The duo comprised of Lindsay Pitts and Clifford John Usher dropped their first release for the District’s own Carpark Records in 2015. Kill the One You Love is equal parts sad and smooth – everything you could ever want from a synth-pop album. The band kept fairly quiet for three years after but to the delight of all of us who love dancing and crying in equal measure, returned this year with several beautiful singles. They’ve also reimagined and re-recorded John Lennon’s iconic album Imagine in full. I can only hope this is an indication of another melancholy gem (ha) of an album on the horizon. Visit www.gems-band.com for more.

HC

HOLYCHILD
The brainchild of George Washington University graduates Liz Nistico and Louie Diller burst onto the pop scene in 2014 with “Happy with Me,” a song examining the daunting task of living up to impossible beauty standards with a crazy danceable beat. Since then, the self-described brat pop band set up shop in Los Angeles, California, and worked with artists like Kate Nash and Tkay Maidza. They returned as powerful as ever with three new singles this fall. Visit www.holychildmusic.com for more.

IJ

Innanet James
I like to think I’m on top of most recent releases, but my little brother is always one step ahead of me – a healthy sibling rivalry of who knows the best new artists frequently ensues. He sent along several tracks by this Maryland born, DC based rapper – 2018’s “Amazing” and “Bag” – and I’ve been hooked ever since. He raps over neo soul beats with honesty and precision, and featured his once DC residence on Quebec Place on the cover of his EP of the same name. He released his fantastic album Keep it Clean this September, complete with features from Pusha T, Taliwhoah and more. Follow him on Twitter @innanetjames for more.

JG

Jenna Camille
Maryland-born, DC-educated Jenna Camille has natural talent and classical training in spades. Her gorgeously smoky voice finds itself combined with jazzy electronic production on her infectious tracks. In addition to writing, recording and producing her own music, she is a frequent collaborator of other acts such as BELVE, Poor boY EXP and Seven Jackson. Follow her on Twitter @JennaCamille for more.

JUL

Julian
I’ve had the joy of seeing this project, helmed by Julia Leiby, open for several bands throughout the city. Bringing together a rotating cast of like-minded musical friends, Julian makes understated but powerful indie pop worthy of soundtracking a dreamy movie montage. Their latest release, Real Distance, saw them polish their sound, and is their strongest and most affecting work to date. Visit www.juliandc.bandcamp.com for more.

LAV

Lavender
This indie pop group comprised of five college friends makes ethereal anthems for anyone who loves glossy, dreamy tunes with a side of emotional honesty. They cite contemporaries The 1975 and The Naked and Famous as influences, and are a necessary addition to any playlist built for introspection or relaxation. Don’t be fooled by their chill vibes, though – the instrumentation is powerful and refined as well. Visit www.lavenderdc.bandcamp.com for more.

LL

Loi Loi
This pair of DC natives is set to release their album Me: Dystopia early next year. They’ll bring their vivacious marriage of darkwave (think dark and romantic), timely lyrics and worldly sounds to Union Stage on November 10 and Dupont Underground on November 16. Listen to the lead single “Company Girl” now. Follow them on Instagram @yo_soy_loiloi for more. Union Stage: 740 Water St. SW, DC; www.unionstage.com // Dupont Underground: 19 Dupont Cir. NW, DC; www.dupontunderground.org

LH

Luna Honey
Evoking the dark and powerful feelings of genre greats PJ Harvey and Nick Cave, Luna Honey makes music that can only be described as cathartic and beautiful. While Maura Pond’s vocals stand out on every track, what anchors Luna Honey is the marriage of bare basslines and baritone sax: unsettling and comforting all at once. Don’t miss them take the stage on November 11 at DC9. Visit www.lunahoney.bandcamp.com for more. DC9: 1940 9th St. NW, DC; www.dc9.club

MG

Makeup Girl
Have you ever discovered a band that makes you excited for the future? Both the future of that band and music as a whole? I couldn’t shake that warm, fuzzy feeling the first time I listened to Makeup Girl’s Living Safe EP, released this past summer. While their sound is reminiscent of early Two Door Cinema Club and Humbug era Arctic Monkeys, it’s clear this band is in a league of their own. Catch them at Arlington’s Galaxy Hut on November 11 and keep your eyes on them in general – this four piece group is going places. Visit www.makeupgirlband.com for more. Galaxy Hut: 2711 Wilson Blvd. Arlington VA; www.galaxyhut.com

MESS

The Messthetics
This band is nothing if not a supergroup. Comprised of two former Fugazi members and several other heavy hitters in the DC hardcore scene, the group harkens back to the heyday of DC punk and reminds us it’s not going anywhere. Their self-titled album was released on the beloved Dischord Records, and is a must for DC music lovers and anyone else who appreciates an excellent rock record. They’ll play Baltimore’s Rams Head Live on December 27. Visit www.dischord.com/band/messthetics for more. Rams Head Live: 20 Market Pl. Baltimore, MD; www.ramsheadlive.com

NH

Nick Hakim
I recommend Nick Hakim’s 2017 release Green Twins to just about anyone who will listen. What I won’t recommend, however, is putting Hakim’s music in a box. His retro-futurist vibe and hypnotic vocals are just the beginning of what makes his music stand out. Citing a whole host of “one of these things is not like the other” influences, Hakim’s music is perfect for a dreamy, cold winter’s day and something you have to synthesize for yourself. He dropped the single “Vincent Tyler” this summer, and I can’t wait to see what’s on the horizon for Hakim. Visit www.nickhakim.com for more.


WYLD

Wylder’s Will McCarry
Wylder’s dreamy blend of folk pop is heavily influenced by the natural surroundings of their native Virginia. As they gear up for their much-anticipated sophomore album, singer and guitarist Will McCarry told On Tap all about influences, favorite venues and upcoming music.

On Tap: With roots in DC and Virginia, how have both influenced your music?
Will McCarry: Rural Virginia had a huge influence on my musical taste and the kind of songs I want to write. The organic and naturalistic elements of our sound comes from my upbringing.

OT: Do you have a favorite local venue? Any that you haven’t played on your wish list?
WM: DC is home to amazing venues. In February we headlined U Street Music Hall for a show presented by the 9:30 Club. Performing in front of fans that braved a snowstorm to be there made it one we’ll never forget. Recently we had the chance to perform on stage at The Anthem, the venue is unlike any space we’ve performed in before.

OT: How have the music scenes in DC and Virginia supported you?
WM: [We] began in Fredericksburg, Virginia. The early days playing on campus helped us discover our path. As we began performing in DC more often, venues like Black Cat and Jammin Java gave us a chance to headline.

OT: What can listeners expect from your sophomore album?
WM:
I think this new record represents the next logical step for Wylder and features the most fully realized version of what I’ve always wanted this band to be. It is at once a major departure from Rain and Laura and an expansion on all the things fans enjoy about that record.  Our first single from the record, “Ready to Break,” will be out on November 16.

OT: Anyone from the DC music scene you’d really like to work with?
WM: We’d love to put together a show featuring a full orchestral section performing the songs alongside us

OT: Any upcoming shows in the area?
WM: You can catch us performing live in DC at Gypsy Sally’s on November 30 alongside The Last Bison or in Tysons Corner on December 1 for an acoustic set at Records and Rarities.

Catch Wylder at Gypsy Sally’s on Friday, November 30. Tickets start at $15. Visit www.wyldermusic.com for more.

Gypsy Sally’s: 3401 K St. NW, DC; www.gypsysallys.com


OG

OG Lullabies
I was lucky enough to catch OG Lullabies, the project of singer and violinist Taylor Brooke, earlier this year right around the release of her EP CRUESCONTROL. The otherworldly nature of her music evokes peace and an existence on a different earthly plane at times. With an emphasis on the all-encompassing experience music creates in a listener, Brooke’s beautiful sounds create a welcome respite from your everyday woes in sonic form. Visit www.oglullabies.com for more.

OTD

Oh He Dead
I have no idea what this DC duo’s name is in reference to, but I love it. I also love their bass-heavy, neo soul and refreshingly honest songwriting. To date they only have one single and a three song EP available, but I have full confidence the duo of Cynthia Johnson and Anthony Valenti will bless us with more repeat worthy tracks soon. Visit www.ohhedead.com for more.

PS

Park Snakes
“I am an alien, I am a ghost, I am the devil, I am alone,” sings vocalist Nenet on the band’s track “Alien,” a meditation on identity. Self-described as “degeneration rock,” this group’s music could easily soundtrack a noir film (or more realistically, a long DC drive on a foggy day). Be sure to add their latest release, Silk, to any winter playlists you may be curating. Visit www.parksnakes.com for more.

PRIESTS

Priests
DC’s most prolific punks of today released their album Nothing Feels Natural last year and have focused heavily on the District’s creative circuit and national tours. They run Sister Polygon Records and lend their talents to other DC bands, all while providing an unwavering political voice that’s needed now more than ever. They’ll take the stage at Baltimore’s Metro Gallery on December 11. It’s worth the trek to Charm City to see these icons in action. Visit www.666priests666.com for more. Metro Gallery: 1700 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD; www.themetrogallery.net

RN

Rico Nasty
Everyone loves Rico Nasty but only the DMV gets to call her our own. She’s one of the hardest working artists in any genre. At 21, she’s already released six mixtapes, including her first release as an Atlantic Records signee, Nasty. She calls her catchy, sweet blend of rap “sugar trap,” and while she’s certainly come a long way from her first hit “iCarly” to her newer releases soundtracking shows like Insecure, she’s bound to be a fixture on the national rap scene for a long time. Visit www.riconastymusic.com for more.

SS

Stronger Sex
This experimental electronic duo will have you dancing as much as contemplating a variety of timely topics. They blend 80s synth sensibilities dating back to The Cure or Talking Heads with theatrical and impassioned vocals. Their 2018 full length release There is No Stronger Sex is a smart breath of fresh air and the answer to everyone’s contemplative but groovy needs. Visit www.strongersex.bandcamp.com for more.

UB

Ultra Beauty
This band provides an unlikely combination of pop and punk, but not in the way bands you loved in middle school did. Instead, it’s more like jagged, heavy instrumentation layered with catchy choruses sung sweetly. By combining the best elements of these two genres, the trio provides some of the most exciting tunes to come out of the city this year with their self titled debut.  Visit www.ultrabeauty.bandcamp.com for more.

Glasses with different sorts of craft beer, wooden barrel and barley. Retro stylization

What’s On Tap: November Beer Listings

Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Guided Mead Tasting at Capitol Cider House
Come learn all about mead (aka honey wine) from the team at Orchid Cellar, Maryland’s premier meadery. The best part? Your ticket includes a guided tasting through six handcrafted meads. The cider house will remain open following the second session for attendees who wish to sample more of the menu. First session at 6 p.m., second session at 8 p.m. Tickets $15. Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8

Brew Republic Fall Beer Dinner
Enjoy a four-course dinner paired with Brew Republic beers, including hearty greens, pork belly medallions, honey baked Cornish hen and red wine poached pears with sorbet. 5-8 p.m. Tickets $55. Brew Republic Bierwerks: 15201 Potomac Town Pl. Woodbridge, VA; www.brewrepublic.beer

Brewmaster Tour at Heurich House Museum
Admission includes an hour-long guided tour of the museum and a local craft beer tasting from Bluejacket. Receive one beer flight per person, featuring 4 oz. pours of three local beers, and experience the Brewmaster’s Castle with a drink in your hand. After the tour, you are welcome to mingle in the Conservatory and purchase full beers. 5-6:30 p.m. Tickets $30. Heurich House Museum: 1307 New Hampshire Ave. NW, DC; www.heurichhouse.org

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

Fourth Annual Movemberfest Pig Roast
Hosted by Little Miss Whiskey’s Golden Dollar, this event features amazing food provided by Chef Ryan Gordon of The Queen Vic and frosty beverages by the team at DC Brau Brewery. As always, there will be a cash raffle with hundreds of dollars in prizes and this year will include a silent auction with all types of amazing DMV-centric prizes and memorabilia. 3-8 p.m. Tickets $60. Little Miss Whiskey’s Golden Dollar: 1104 H St. NE, DC; www.littlemisswhiskeys.com

DC Beerathon
The DC Beerathon is an annual tradition of craft and premium beers at DC’s best bars and restaurants, now in its 7th year. The original idea behind the Beerathon was to create a marathon event in November for those of you whose enthusiasm for running includes making a beer-run. Come enjoy all-day access to great beer and food at DC’s best venues. A ticket gets you a 6 oz. tasting pour of 26 beers, an all-access VIP pass to the 13 participating venues and a map to guide you. 12-10 p.m. Tickets $55. Check in at Nellie’s Sports Bar: 900 U St. NW, DC or Buffalo Billiards: 1330 19th St. NW, DC;
www.beerathon.com/washingtondc

Pizzeria Paradiso Autumn Fest
Join in celebrating autumn for the third part of Paradiso Four Seasons Beer Fests. This season’s beer fest will take place at the Old Town Alexandria location. This festival will feature a draft line of seasonal favorites, rare and exceptional Virginia beer, cornhole, oversized Jenga and other games. The restaurant is partnering with Art Works Now to create a mini-pumpkin painting activity for kids, making this event fun for the entire family. Pizzeria Paradiso: 124 King St. Alexandria, VA; www.eatyourpizza.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Annual Cask Ale Festival at Mad Fox Brewing Company
Join Mad Fox for the Mid-Atlantic’s largest cask ale event. Sample more than 30 special and limited edition cask conditioned ales from around the region at the two day, indoor event. Enjoy music and fantastic food while sipping traditional cask conditioned ales. There will be special tappings throughout the day on Saturday, with more offerings and special tappings to be announced. 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. on both days. Tickets $20 for both days. Mad Fox Brewing Company: 444 W Broad St. Falls Church, VA; www.madfoxbrewing.com

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

FlyFIT at DC Brau
Don’t miss this fun fitness experience with our DC Brau. FlyFIT offers low impact cardio, endurance-based strength and mobility, and heavier strength training combined with high intensity intervals. Instructors Stephen Murray, David McMichael and Savannah Fox will lead you through this 45-minute workout, followed by a post-workout beer. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free with registration. DC Brau: 3178 Bladensburg Rd. NE, DC; www.dcbrau.com

Paint & Brew at Forge Brew Works
Novice painter? No worries. Artists will guide you through the painting step-by-step and you’ll be amazed with what you can do. Either follow the instructions or make it your own. Bringing a friend or partner? Save on tickets when you purchase a pair. Pre-registration is required. It is recommended to arrive 15 minutes early to check-in, choose your seats and grab your beer. Includes a flight of four beers. 1-3 p.m. Tickets $35-$60. Forge Brew Works: 8532 Terminal Rd. Lorton, VA; www.forgebrewworks.com

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12

Lost Rhino Beer Dinner
Craft beer is a passion, an obsession and a journey. From hoppy to malty to sour, take a trip through all the flavors. You’ll enjoy a welcome reception with a shared appetizer and a glass of tmavý before moving to a seated dinner featuring four brews and four courses from Matchbox executive chef Vekys Rodriguez de Lopez. 7-9 p.m. Tickets $55. Matchbox Vintage Pizza Bistro: 2911 District Ave. #120, Fairfax, VA; www.matchboxrestaurants.com

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14

A Guided Pairing: Holidays & Beer
As the holiday season approaches, let the Old Blue BBQ and Port City Brewing guide you through the various holiday feasts that lie ahead, such as Thanksgiving, New Years and, of course, Festivus. Food is an important part of any holiday tradition and Port City wants to make sure you are prepared with the best beers to complement each meal. In this jolly and unique pairing, each course will represent one holiday paired with the perfect beer for the occasion. There will be five holiday pairings, with five 8 oz. pours of your Port City favorites. 7-9 p.m. Tickets $45. Port City Brewery: 3950 Wheeler Ave. Alexandria, VA; www.portcitybrewing.com

Profs and Pints: The Genius of Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin’s genius is a puzzle. Born the tenth and youngest son of a decidedly humble family of puritan candle-makers, his rise to the front ranks of science, engineering and invention was as unexpected as it was meteoric. In this talk professor Richard Bell will examine many of Franklin’s ideas to make life simpler, cheaper and easier for himself and everyone else. It turns out that those ideas encompassed not only natural science and engineering – the kite experiments and the bifocals for which he is justly remembered – but also public works, civic improvements, political innovation and fresh new business ideas. Event at 6 p.m. Tickets $12. Bier Baron Tavern: 1523 22nd St. NW, DC; www.inlovewithbier.com

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23

Hoppy Black Friday Yoga at Eavesdrop Brewing
No better time to invite joy (and folds and twists for the digestive system) than the day after Thanksgiving, a.k.a. Black Friday. Sure, you could be stuck in lines at the mall for hours on end (you’ll need a good stretch after shopping), or you could roll out your mat at beautiful Eavesdrop Brewing for an hour of self-care indulgence, followed by delicious craft beer. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Tickets $20. Eavesdrop Brewery: 7223 Centreville Rd. Ste. #115, Manassas, VA; www.eavesdropbrewery.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24

5th Annual DC Brau Holiday Market
DC Brau’s 5th annual Holiday Market, presented in partnership with Think Local First DC, returns on Small Business Saturday. DC Brau will transform the brewery into a crafters marketplace for one day only, perfect for visitors to start (and finish) their holiday shopping with unique wares from more than 40 local artists and artisans in a unique indoor setting. 1-6 p.m. Free to attend, but VIP tickets are $10. DC Brau: 3178 Bladensburg Rd. NE, DC; www.dcbrau.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29

BrewLights at ZooLights
Friends of the National Zoo’s hoppiest holiday event, BrewLights, a ticketed microbrew and craft beer event, will take place during ZooLights, powered by Pepco. Guests can enjoy beer tastings from dozens of breweries and sample complimentary snacks, all under the bright lights of DC’s favorite holiday tradition. All proceeds support the critical work of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute – including species preservation and animal care. 6-9 p.m. Tickets $40-$60. Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute: 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW, DC; www.nationalzoo.si.edu

Stage and Screen Events: November 2018

Through Wednesday, November 21

Films Across Borders: Stories of Women
As a frequent moviegoer, even I find it difficult to keep up with foreign films. Unless they are slated to be acknowledged during award season or carry a tremendous amount of hype, they are often lower on my priority list when it comes to choosing which film off the marquee to watch. However, the American University’s Films Across Borders series is an opportunity to head to several venues and appreciate a variety of stories. This year’s theme, Stories of Women, will showcase an assortment of films representing women from diverse backgrounds and represent the importance of “gender-balanced perspectives and parity” in our society. The festival includes screenings, panels and Q&As on a number of topics within the theme. Times, dates and ticket prices vary. Films Across Borders: Various locations around the DMV; www.american.edu.soc/films-across-borders

Through Sunday, December 2

King John
No folks, we’re not talking about the King in the North, John Snow. Rather, we’re talking about a different King John, and one who has less accolades than the bastard child of Winterfell. Folger’s King John takes audiences back to the days of the Magna Carta and represents a sly look at the politics of Old England. This winter, director Aaron Posner brings this chaotic combination of ambition and boneheaded decison-making to life.  Various dates. Tickets $42-$79. Folger Theatre: 201 East Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

Saturday, November 3 – Sunday, December 2

As You Like It
After several people are forced from their homes, they escape into the forest of Arden, a place where you get lost in nature while simultaneously finding yourself. However, this is a Shakespeare retelling so the story encompasses themes like families at each other’s throats and lovers forced to feign the opposite. The New York Times declared this Shaina Taub and Laurie Woolery musical adaptation as one of the best shows in 2017, and the refugees who form this new community among the trees are all set to blow DC away in its District debut. Various dates, times and ticket prices. The Keegan Theatre: 1742 Church St. NW, DC; www.keegantheatre.com

Friday, November 9 – Saturday, November 10

Malavika Sarukkai: Thari – The Loom
Making her return to the Kennedy Center after a five-year hiatus, Malavika Sarukkai brings her mastery of the classical Indian dance style bharatanatyam with her latest production, Thari – The Loom. This performance is said to investigate the scope and legacy of the sari, a hand-woven garment famously from India, and how the changing mythos of the symbol “becomes a metaphor for life itself.” Show is at 7:30 p.m. on both days. Tickets $49. The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

Tuesday, November 13

Story District Presents: Cat-Headed Baby
Looking for a unique twist on storytelling? Then search no further, as Storytelling District continues its monthly tradition of having locals stand on a stage while delivering unusual tales about superstitions, hoaxes and other oddities. Though it sounds silly, these provocative narratives are more than just random thought bubbles from your DMV neighbors, as each seven-minute performance contains an original true story that aligns with the theme of the month. As if I need to sell you on it any harder, The Washington Post deemed Story District the “gold standard in storytelling.” Doors at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20. Black Cat: 1811 14th St. NW, DC; www.blackcatdc.com

Wednesday, November 14

Limetown Panel
A fictional town covered by a fictional version of NPR, this live podcast offers a true-crime story with a layout similar to Serial with subject matter inspired by The X-Files. Somewhere in Tennessee, 300 people go missing, and American Public Radio’s Lia Haddock is on the scene detailing its happening. This panel discussion will feature creators Zack Akers and Skip Bronkie, with author of their new prequel novel Cote Smith, as the trio discusses the new story involving Haddock’s intriguing past. Panel begins at 7 p.m. Tickets $16-$30. Sixth & I: 600 I St. NW, DC; www.sixthandi.org

Wednesday, November 14 – Sunday, December 16

Cry It Out
Parenthood is hard, sure, but you know what else is hard? Making friends as an adult. Without the built-in friend finder of school, navigating life as an adult takes up a ton of time, which sort of puts making new acquaintances on the backburner, and when you add children on top of all that – whew, good luck. Essentially this is where the characters in Studio Theatre’s Cry It Out find themselves, as two young couples separated by a few yards between their homes luckily strike up a friendship, bonding over all the tougher aspects of raising children. This comedy is sure to be a relatable story that examines parenthood and class in the U.S. Various dates, times and ticket prices. Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

Sunday, November 18

Frankenstein
Humans have always had a fascination with science fiction. Before we could even fly country to country or state to state, there were books about alien visitation, trips to the moon and time travel. With artificial intelligence and super computers constantly in the news (shout out to Skyne…I mean Google) one of the original fictional creators of artificial intelligence was Mary Shelley’s Victor Frankenstein, a scientist who sewed different body parts he found in the cemetery together to create a humanoid. However, the doctor was appalled by his creation and fled the scene only to be followed and accosted by his monster, and no, we’re not talking the bolts in the neck one from the Munsters. This play pays homage to Shelley’s novel, which tackled a plethora of ethical questions that our modern science is only now beginning to encounter in the real world. Talk about timely. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets $44. George Mason Center for the Arts: 4400 University Dr. Fairfax, VA; http://cfa.gmu.edu

Wednesday, November 21

Jackson Galaxy
The Cat Daddy himself is making his way to DC. Most famously known as the host of Animal Planet’s My Cat From Hell, Galaxy has also penned two New York Times bestsellers and has more than 25 years of experience working with our feline friends. For this presentation at the famed Lincoln Theatre, Galaxy will divulge how he found his mojo and how to get to know your cat, and the “raw cat” (aka his ancestor who was totally not a social kitty.) Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets $45-$60. The Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

2018-2019 Performing Arts Guide: 25 Must-See Performances

Scattered among the hustle and bustle of DC’s bureaucracy, there are creative hubs of everyone from singers and actors to directors and writers, practicing day by day to give you exceptional shows this performing arts season. From upscale date nights at the Kennedy Center to intimate performances at Signature Theatre, we’ve collected some of the most enticing and need-to-know shows for lovers of the stage.

This year, there are the usual themes of love and Shakespeare adaptations, but have you ever seen Shakespeare set in a 1980s Manhattan dive bar where the love is as fluid as the music? Gender-bending and upbeat, you can catch Illyria at Gunston Arts Center. Or stick a little closer to the classics at National Theatre with the heart-fluttering magic of Finding Neverland, based on the Academy Award-winning film. We’re also excited for DC comedy this season, including Bentzen Ball returning this month with a wonderfully diverse lineup of the funniest voices out right now.

If you’re missing your summer vacation, you can catch a wave with Arena Stage’s Anything Goes, set on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean and starring Disney Channel’s Corbin Bleu. True crime nerds and future lawyers won’t want to miss the behind-the-scenes investigative journey of Netflix’s Making a Murderer at Lincoln Theatre. This season’s stories are like a bouquet of Edible Arrangements: completely enticing and with a performance for everyone. Don’t wait to pick your treat!

October

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18

Illyria
This WSC (Washington Shakespeare Company) Avant Bard production set in the 1980s is a colorful and music-heavy tale where gender is an afterthought. Illyria is freely adapted from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, a story in which seemingly straight characters fall in love with someone despite their projected gender identity and not because of it. Ezra Tozian will be playing Viola in her cross-dressing performance as Cesario, taking the act to another level as a performance within a performance. What are the subtle mannerisms that she’ll take from gender to gender? What is it about Viola and Cesario that their admirers will fall in love with? The titular Illyria dive bar in Manhattan will intertwine the lives of multiple identities, all while bumping the music of love. Gunston Arts Center’s Theatre Two: 2700 S. Lang St. Arlington, VA; www.wscavantbard.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 – SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 & FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 – SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

Trevor Noah
You have no excuse to miss one of the fiercest names in comedy this fall. The South African comedian and The Daily Show host will make multiple appearances at DAR Constitution Hall in October, where he’ll continue to use his platform to discuss race and social justice in his home country and here in the U.S. We can’t think of a better way to round out your weekend than with Noah’s wit and wisdom. DAR Constitution Hall: 1776 D St. NW, DC; www.dar.org

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 – FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28

Bentzen Ball Comedy Festival
Comedian Tig Notaro has curated three nights of comedy just for DC. First up is Phoebe Robinson, from HBO’s 2 Dope Queens and Netflix’s Ibiza. Stick around for Amanda Seales’ presentation of “Smart, Funny, & Black.” You’ll know Seales from HBO’s runaway hit Insecure. And I can’t wait to hear what kind of funny disaster stories will be shared during “#Adulting” with Michelle Buteau and Jordan Carlos. Unfortunately, the exuberant jokester Jonathan Van Ness (of Queer Eye fame) is already sold out. You can still enjoy performances by the previously mentioned though, as well as Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher. I love the idea of a festival full of diverse talent who are passionate about bringing their comedic style center stage. The Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30 – WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9

Billy Elliot
Ballet. Coal mining. Labor strikes. Following your dreams. An infectious soundtrack, courtesy of Sir Elton John himself. What do all of these things have in common? They’re all part of the iconic tale of the boy who loved to dance, coming to Arlington’s award-winning, intimate space at Signature Theatre. The singalong tale will run through the holidays, providing the perfect opportunity to show DC’s magnificent productions of classic theatre to your houseguests. Or sneak out and enjoy this feel-good, toe-tapping tale on your own. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

Anything Goes 2

November

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 – SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23

Anything Goes
As the SS American carries away its passengers from London to New York, it also sails a little secret across the ocean. There’s a passionate love stowed away between Billy and the countess Hope Harcourt. She’s meant to get married to the wealthy Lord Evelyn Oakleigh (please pronounce in your snootiest voice – it’s probably an accurate descriptor of the character). Of course, Billy doesn’t have the riches, but he does have determination and that has to count for something, right? He manages to get some fellow passengers on board (ha) with his mission, and the rest is for you to find out. I’ll be rooting for Billy mostly because he’s played by a familiar face, Disney Channel’s own Corbin Bleu. Arena Stage’s Fichandler Stage: 1101 Sixth St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Inside Netflix’s Making a Murderer
The documentary series centered on Steven Avery’s wrongful conviction of sexual assault and attempted murder at the age of 23 offers a deeper dive into the stories from the lawyers in the courtroom with him. Avery spent 18 years in prison before his exoneration, only to be convicted of another murder two years after his release. Anyone who gets a thrill from cold cases will love this discussion, with time for audience questions. Attorneys David Rudolf and Jerry Buting will share the ins and outs of their work on the cases, reminding us all that true crime stories aren’t just tales for our entertainment. These cases are the culmination of investigation, interviews, anxiety and a search for truth spanning decades. The in-depth event will be moderated by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $35. The Lincoln Theatre: 1215 U St. NW, DC; www.thelincolndc.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Comedy Get Down
Four of the biggest names in comedy – Eddie Griffin, George Lopez, D.L. Hughley and Cedric The Entertainer – reunite to bring their individual comedic talents to one night of comedy at MGM Theatre. The incredibly accomplished lineup returns for two nights of laughs after their wildly successful, sort-of-scripted (but always real) series based on the 2017 version of the tour aired on BET. No matter your preferred brand of comedy, you’re guaranteed a good time at one of these performances. The Theater at MGM National Harbor: 101 MGM National Ave. Oxon Hill, MD; www.mgmnationalharbor.com

Elf the Musical

December

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

Elf The Musical
Everyone’s favorite modern Christmas classic hits the stage just in time for the holiday season. In case you’ve never seen Will Ferrell’s magnum opus (just one gal’s humble opinion), this absurd and endearing comedy sees an orphaned boy raised in the North Pole by elves venture to the Big Apple in search of his father during the most wonderful time of the year. A night of wholesome, wintry laughs is guaranteed. I’m so excited I could cram 11 cookies into my VCR. Olney Theatre Centre: 2001 Olney Sandy Spring Rd. Olney, MD; www.olneytheatre.org

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

The Panties, The Partner and The Profit
German playwright Carl Sternheim is an unsung hero in the art of satire. Playwright David Ives and Shakespeare Theatre Company (STC) are bringing meditations on the middle class to the U.S. with this adaptation of Sternheim’s trilogy of plays about the Mask family – this time set across America and spanning the 1950s to the 1980s. In addition to bringing this adaptation stateside, Ives will collaborate with STC Artistic Director Michael Kahn for the final time as he rounds out his 30-year role with the theatre company. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Lansburgh Theatre: 450 7th St. NW, DC; www.shakespearetheatre.org

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18 – SUNDAY, JANUARY 6

The Play That Goes Wrong
This is a classic case of whodunnit that will make you…laugh? The play’s premise has a group putting on their own play, The Murder at Haversham Manor, and the cast is about as great as if your uncle wrangled his five kids and your grandmother together to perform at the holiday party. The murder mystery is less thrill and suspense, more bizarre and meant to make you cry of laughter rather than fear. The production describes itself as the illegitimate Broadway baby of Sherlock Holmes and Monty Python, and satirizes the idea of a terribly untalented production of actors through purposeful missed lines and breathing “corpses.” Fire extinguishers put out a person – not a fire – and doors hit actors and fall off the hinges entirely. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: 2700 F St. NW, DC; www.kennedy-center.org

Nell Gwynn

January

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 – SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Twelve Angry Men
The American justice system exists in tumult, and this classic play shows us that it has been in that state for a long time. For those of you who somehow made it out of a high school government class without watching the movie adaptation of Twelve Angry Men, the story follows 12 men who are identified only by their juror numbers as they contentiously deliberate the fate of a young Hispanic boy accused of killing his father. Race, justice, age and community are examined in this classic and evergreen story. Ford’s Theatre: 511 10th St. NW, DC; www.fordstheatre.org

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20

Step Afrika! 25th Anniversary Celebration
Traditional stepping has origins in South Africa and has since made its way into American pop culture and the traditions of historically black fraternities and sororities. Despite centuries-old history, Step Afrika! is the first professional stepping company. Combining influences from other dance forms, their high-energy and heart-pumping performances tell a story through stomps, claps and synchronized techniques. Though their moves seem on par with Olympic-level gymnastics, some dances are impressively elevated when performed in business wear – belts, vests and all. This year’s performance is special in more ways than one for the company, as 2019 commemorates 25 years since President Nelson Mandela’s election. $34-$75. The Music Center at Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 – SUNDAY MARCH 10

Nell Gwynn
At first blush, this is the tale of the life and times of one of King Charles II of England’s many mistresses: the titular Nell Gwynn. Dig deeper and you’ll find a glimpse into the transformative history of women breaking boundaries while cracking jokes. Nell is caught heckling performers at a play, and instead of being cast out for her behavior, it leads her to be one of the first women cast as a player in the King’s company. This eventually finds Nell in the arms of the King, but her personal journey is more captivating than any love story. If someone in 17th-century England can concede that women – even ones who heckle – are funny, we can surely stop arguing about that today. Don’t miss Nell’s remarkable ride this winter. Folger Theatre: 201 E. Capitol St. SE, DC; www.folger.edu

BLKS

February

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

BLKS
Sex and the City has a way different meaning for Octavia, a New York City native who had a serious STD scare. Like any rational 20-something undergoing a stressful, possibly life-changing trauma, she decides she’ll need the help of her best girlfriends, June and Imani, to navigate her next steps. The trio experience much of what you’d expect when gallivanting around the city after dark: interactions with attractive men and women whose words and personalities ruin any romantic and sexual pursuit. The way the girls’ encounters interact with their identities is a prominent message in this production. They’re women, they’re millennials and they’re black – and even though they’re close, this one night has them jumping over hurdles that will either strengthen their bond or completely break through it. Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: 641 D St. NW, DC; www.woollymammoth.net

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – SUNDAY, MARCH 10

The Heiress
It is an unfortunate worldwide truth that money cannot replace the love of another person. Catherine Sloper, the heiress in question, is a prime example. She’s been raised in 1840s New York and is monetarily wealthy but poor in affection. Any shred of her father’s warmth has been guarded since her mother died during childbirth – and she’s never been one with many admirers. She’s socially awkward – much more relatable than inherited wealth – and not obviously beautiful. Catherine has long learned to be complacent with what she has, until a cute guy takes interest in her and she finally feels the adoration she’s missed her whole life. This live love story may or may not make you cry. Arena Stage’s Fichandler Stage: 1101 6th St. SW, DC; www.arenastage.org

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – SUNDAY, MARCH 3

Finding Neverland the Musical
With just a bit of faith, trust and pixie dust, playwright J.M. Barrie gave us the classic, dreamy tale of Peter Pan and Neverland – a sweet escape from bedtimes and lecturing fathers. Finding Neverland the Musical offers a behind-the-scenes look at Barrie’s inspiration, introducing the real George, Michael and Peter in his life. Just when Barrie stopped believing, he met the family that sparked the magic he needed in his own career as a writer. There’s something heartwarming about the story that sprouted imagination in so many children being born from the real make-believe games of young boys. If there’s anything that connects us all through time and geography, it’s our longing to see more than what appears and create new worlds. Don’t miss the spectacular reimagining of the story behind the story. Tickets $54 and up. National Theatre: 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; www.findingneverlandthemusical.com

Queen of Basel

March

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – SUNDAY, MARCH 31

Vanity Fair
Playwright Kate Hamill takes William Makepeace Thackeray’s “novel without a hero” to the stage with new eyes for the character’s complex, vivacious inner lives. This adaptation sees good friends Amelia and Becky make their way through the world in a society that’s unforgiving to women regardless of appearance, wealth or status. At the heart of Hamill’s take is the beauty and strength of female friendship that allows the women to overcome the patriarchal boundaries that attempt to restrict them. And while the original novel was written in the mid-1800s, the story is just as relevant today. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall: 610 F St. NW, DC; www.shakespearetheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 – SUNDAY APRIL 7

Queen of Basel
Anyone rich and famous on the Sunshine State’s coast is partying away for the week-long Art Basel. It seems like a high point for Julie, whose father’s savvy hotel property investments got her the extra star treatment in a swanky room. She’s engaged, it’s her hotel and nothing can go wrong. But before the party ends, she’s single again and stuck in a tight space with hotel employees. Julie learns of the other side of Miami from Floridians who live in the slums – still the luckier side of the coin compared to Venezuela, where employee Christine fled from political dangers. Julie never expected to celebrate Art Basel hiding from her loved ones, but what she gains from speaking with Christine is more valuable than what a price tag can note. Tickets $20-$80. Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 – SATURDAY, APRIL 6

Hands on a Hardbody
This new take on a truly American experience deals with relationships, immigration, transportation and more. Ten Texans from all different walks of life vie for a truck in a “hands on a hardbody” contest in the hot summer sun. As they fight for a new set of wheels, this off-the-wall environment brings truths about the contest, each contestant and their community to light. Based on a documentary of the same name that premiered in 1997, the story feels every bit as relevant more than a decade later. Tickets begin at $52. Keegan Theatre: 1742 Church St. NW, DC; www.keegantheatre.com

Grand Hotel

April

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 – SATURDAY, APRIL 20

Columbinus
It’s been 20 years since the Columbine High School massacre, and tragically, the United States has not seen improvement in keeping students safe from school shootings. A new wave of teens from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are continuing to push the fight forward. This docudrama comes at a compelling time to remind us all of where we started, and how it hasn’t gotten better two decades later. Among all the difficulties and growing pains that characterize “teenage angst,” it’s unimaginable to feel the way the Columbine and MSD students did. Columbinus combines real interviews from the time of the shooting with survivors, the parents and others in the community. For those involved in the debate or who are passionate about reform, this is likely to generate new discussions on the matter. 1st Stage: 1524 Spring Hill Rd. Tysons, VA; www.1ststagetysons.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 2 – SUNDAY, MAY 12

Grand Hotel
Berlin in the 1920s was a precious period of creative and economic prosperity. What better way to peek into the lives of Berlin’s personalities than visiting a hotel? The Grand Hotel sees many swinging its doors and booking rooms, causing lots of mix-matches to collide and mingle – like the ballerina who jetés into the hotel and has unlikely interactions with a bookkeeper, as well as a typist and a baron. This musical will feature some special performances including discussion nights, a pride night and a performance with open captioning. Signature Theatre: 4200 Campbell Ave. Arlington, VA; www.sigtheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 – SUNDAY, MAY 19

Oslo
This three-hour play is based on the true story of a husband-and-wife diplomat team who, unbeknownst to the proper channels, organized instrumental meetings between Israel and Palestine during the Oslo Accords in the early 1990s. As the conflict between those two countries rages on nearly 25 years later, this play provides eloquent insight into a very real and very modern attempt to solve one of the most complicated conflicts in human history. Round House Theatre: 4545 East-West Hwy. Bethesda, MD; www.roundhousetheatre.org

Capture

May

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 – SUNDAY, JUNE 2

The Children
Two retired nuclear physicists live on an island and require stringent routines to get through each day. They’re seemingly making it work, surrounding themselves with healthy food and yoga practice – despite the fact they’re living in a post-apocalyptic world in the aftermath of a nuclear explosion. The couple’s calculated days are brought to a screeching halt with the unexplained appearance of a former coworker, who comes bearing a nasty nosebleed and an even nastier secret. A slow-burning meditation on humankind’s responsibility as stewards of the earth, there couldn’t be a better time to experience this critically acclaimed modern tale. Studio Theatre: 1501 14th St. NW, DC; www.studiotheatre.org

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 – SUNDAY, JUNE 16

Sooner/Later
With To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and other rom-coms dominating the film industry, it’s still unlikely to follow the dating life of a woman who is the single mother of a teenage girl. We usually view the story solely from the teen perspective. This production gives Gilmore Girls vibes, with the charming closeness of a mother and daughter who have a friendly, supportive relationship rather than a strictly parent-child one. But enter one more character who kind of disrupts the dynamic: the man, the love interest, the newcomer. Mosaic Theater Company describes its production as navigating the pains and pleasure of romance, marriage and parenting with a “metaphysical twist.” You’ll want to watch this play sooner rather than later (ha). As a lesser-heard type of story, Sooner/Later needs support to get more stories like it onstage – and maybe you can even bond with your own mom at a performance. Atlas Performing Arts Center: 1333 H St. NE, DC; www.mosaictheater.org

FRIDAY, MAY 17 AND SUNDAY, MAY 19

An Evening of Verdi
The Maryland Lyric Opera has brought numerous works to the DC area since its founding in 2014, and its 2019 season will be no exception. The opera’s talented cast brings the works of famed Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi to the Music Center at Strathmore’s halls. The performance is the perfect outing for opera lovers or those just being introduced to the craft. The Music Center at Strathmore: 5301 Tuckerman Ln. North Bethesda, MD; www.strathmore.org