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Photos: Courtesy of Heavy Seas Brewing

Ale the Heavy Seas with Founder Hugh Sisson

How does an aspiring actor dreaming of big lights in New York City choose the life of a brewer over a career on Broadway? For Heavy Seas founder Hugh Sisson, two things come to mind: success and passion.

In 1980, Sisson took the keys to the family pub rather than leave for an acting career. But instead of stashing cash for a few years and then heading to the city like he’d planned, the young man delayed and delayed until he realized he was already doing what he was meant to.

“I had hesitations,” Sisson says. “It’s one of those things where you’re finishing grad school and have no money, and you’re heading into a field that doesn’t lend itself to cash flow…. my first inclination for this was temporary, it would allow me to save a few dollars and pay off some debt, and then hit New York with a few bucks in my pocket.”

He never left Baltimore for New York. Instead, he ran the family tavern simply called Sisson’s until 1995, when he founded Heavy Seas Beer, a place where his brewing interests could flourish and grow.

“The process of brewing is fascinating,” Sisson says. “When I started in the brewpub it was me and a bunch of books, I was psyched about it. I’d wake up at 3 a.m., go into the office and brew a batch of beer. In those days, it was continuously fascinating and at the end of the day, you’d have a full tank of beer.”

He brewed at Sisson’s for about five years, following a successful campaign to get brewpubs legalized in Maryland.
“Now people pick up the phone and order a brewery,” Sisson says with a laugh. “We had to figure all that crap out. By 1989, the family pub had became the first brewpub in Maryland, and that was an interesting transition.”

Operating at a small scale allowed him to get his hands dirty and be creative with his recipes, but after tasting success at nearly every level, he was ready to move on to a larger operation and Heavy Seas was launched.

Sisson took what he learned, found some other like-minded individuals crazy about brewing and began pumping out more beers. This included annual options like the American IPA Loose Cannon, Pounder Pils, Gold Ale and others. Now The brewery is one of Baltimore’s most notable and has produced several popular beers since its inception.

“It changed and adapted, because as you get larger it becomes more of a business,” Sisson says. “You have to make a product for which there’s a market. You look at the market and figure out where there are holes. Since we don’t live in a world where you make one product and that’s all you do, especially in the craft segment, you’re going to have a portfolio of products.”

Though Sisson and Heavy Seas are into producing classic concoctions that will stand the test of time, they do dabble in seasonal releases that make sense. For instance, the brewery recently installed a 15-barrel pilot system which will allow them to test recipes in the tasting room without getting ahead of themselves with mass production.

“It’s not going to represent a ton of volume, but it serves purposes,” Sisson says. “It gives us a new platform and it allows us to do something crazy at a small enough format to where we’re not betting the ranch. To the extent we can produce one-offs, it helps drive business in the taproom.”

Apart from that, Sisson and his team at Heavy Seas is set to release their new Schnee Boot, a bourbon barrel-aged Eisbock. The brewery is also going to release new spring and winter beers in 2019, as well as some broader visual changes to the brand’s iconography.

“We’re working on a logo change,” Sisson says. “It both excites me and terrifies me. We’ve had the current one for eight years, and we’re changing it because we have to. In small business and beer business, you have to be willing to reinvent yourself from time to time.”

Despite the change in look, you can bet on Heavy Seas to deliver world-class beers in 2019 and beyond.

For more information about Heavy Seas Brewing, brewery tours, taproom tastings or where to find Heavy Seas beer near you, visit www.hsbeer.com.

Heavy Seas Brewing: 4615 Hollins Ferry Rd. Baltimore, MD; 410-247-7822; www.hsbeer.com

Photo: NMAI staff photo, http://blog.nmai.si.edu

Native Foods in Flavor Just In Time For Thanksgiving

We’ve all heard the tale of the first Thanksgiving: a feast where settlers from England and Native Americans gathered around a large wooden dining table outdoors and passed turkey, stuffing and other treats around until everyone was full, happy and thankful.

While turkey and stuffing have become staples in the cultural zeitgeist, Native American food hasn’t, until now. The tide is shifting, and according to an September CNN article, Native American fare is undergoing a refreshing revival around the country. In DC, there is only one restaurant dedicated to its promotion: the Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe located on the first floor of the National Museum of the American Indian.

The Mitsitam menu is designed by Head Chef Freddie Bitsoie, who became the first Native American chef for the cafe in 2016.

“I think the reason why [there is a resurgence] is because of people like myself,” Bitsoie says. “Native food is something that wasn’t popular until Native chefs started talking about it. I had always been taught at a young age that people aren’t going to care until you make them care. So most Native chefs have that mentality. Whatever your point of view is, make them talk about it.”

Bitsoie also references Bobby Flay and Martha Stewart making fried bread on their shows, which caused people to tag and text him snippets with comments indicating the famed and white chefs had no right to culturally appropriate the dish. He disagreed, simply saying that he makes a “damn good” ossobuco, and if he could demo it on TV then he would.

“No Italian chefs would say, ‘I don’t have the right to do that,’” Bitsoie says. “Appropriating Native arts like jewelry [and] fashion, to me, is fine. But food is personal and people want to go home and try things they like. It’s a very fine line to promote and talk about it. But if people are mimicking it, we’re doing what we’re supposed to.”

One reason Native American foods continue to climb in culinary popularity is the fact that they are immeasurably diverse and expansive. As a person without in-depth food knowledge (I’m not really a foodie, if you will), the first thing I think of on mention of Native American food is corn-based dishes and buffalo meat. I was uneducated about salmon planks or the wide variety of soups indigenous chefs have concocted throughout history.

“People really do think boring, bland and grainy when they think of Native foods,” Bitsoie says. “These are things myself and other chefs are trying to change. For instance, New England clam chowder is a soup that has an ancestral path to the North Atlantic. Tribes from Nova Scotia would make soup with clams, sunchokes and sea water. When the English came, they added their cream and butter and that’s how it came to be. I researched and researched to see if there was a clam chowder from England, and I couldn’t find one.”

With Thanksgiving this month, there’s no better time for these dishes to move to the forefront of the culinary world and find homes on menus nationwide. For Bitsoie, Native American foods should still hold weight during the holiday because of its historical significance.

“When it comes to historical stories and historical things, a lot of genocide and other things occurred,” Bitsoie says. “I think more people got along than what we’re portraying, and fed each other. We still have things like the state fair, [which is] a celebration of sharing food.”

Bitsoie says Thanksgivings were pretty standard growing up, with the exception of being at his grandmother’s house where they would pick a sheep and butcher it for an evening meal. These days, his work includes concocting the cafe’s holiday specials. This year’s Thanksgiving options range from your standard turkey to change-up tastes like bison and salmon.

“I think people should be more interested in eating gourd squash,” Bitsoie says. “I think it’s used more as decor right now. What I like to do is rough chop it, toss it in sugar and bake it. It’s a very versatile dish. And I think people should utilize quail a lot more. It’s a very good bird.”

To learn more about the Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe and its food specials for the holidays, visit www.mitsitamcafe.com.

National Museum of the American Indian: Independence Avenue and 4th Street in SW, DC; 202-633-6644; www.mitsitamcafe.com

Celebrating Cider: On Tap’s Guide to Local Cideries

Autumn is just around the corner, and if you’re like us, your taste buds are ready for all things fall: pumpkin spice, cinnamon and apple-flavored everything. If you’re ready to trade in your wheat and fruit beers for something a little more seasonal, try a hard cider from one of the numerous cideries scattered around the DMV (or just a day trip away) in our 2018 Cider Guide. With Virginia growing some of the best apples in the country, you can’t go wrong. From the classic Virginia countryside views at Coyote Hole Ciderworks to the farmhouse-style cider at Willow Oaks Craft Cider, there’s something for everyone.


Albemarle CiderWorks: 2545 Rural Ridge Ln. North Garden, VA; www.albemarleciderworks.com

ANXO Cidery & Tasting Room: 711 Kennedy St. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

Big Fish Cider Co.: 59 Spruce St. Monterey, VA; www.bigfishcider.com

Blue Bee Cider: 1320 Summit Ave. Richmond, VA; www.bluebeecider.com

Blue Toad Hard Cider: 462 Winery Ln. Roseland, VA; www.bluetoadhardcider.com

Bold Rock Hard Cider: 1020 Rockfish Valley Hwy. Nellysford, VA; www.boldrock.com

Bryant’s Cider: 3224 East Branch Loop, Roseland, VA; www.bryantscider.com

Buskey Cider: 2910 W. Leigh St. Richmond, VA; www.buskeycider.com


Castle Hill

Castle Hill Cider
6065 Turkey Sag Rd. Keswick, VA
434-296-0047 | www.castlehillcider.com

Castle Hill Cider blends time-honored traditions with modern techniques to bring you refreshing and award-winning Virginia cider. Their world-class cider makers use time-tested and cutting-edge practices, working to renovate an 80-year-old orchard while collaborating with growers of prime apple varieties. Visit them at their tasting room, open every day of the week from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Winter hours (January to March) are 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Thursday to Monday.


Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; www.capitolciderhouse.com

Cobbler Mountain Cider: 5909 Long Fall Ln. Delaplane, VA; www.cobblermountain.com

Corcoran Vineyards & Cider: 14635 Corkys Farm Ln. Waterford, VA; www.corcorancider.com

Courthouse Creek Cider: 1581 Maidens Rd. Maidens, VA; www.courthousecreek.com

Distillery Lane Ciderworks: 5533 Gapland Rd. Jefferson, MD; www.distillerylaneciderworks.com

Fabbioli Cellars: 15669 Limestone School Rd. Leesburg, VA; www.fabbioliwines.com

Faulkner Branch Cidery & Distillery Co.: 4822 Preston Rd. Federalsburg, MD; www.faulknerbranch.com

Foggy Ridge Cider: 1328 Pine View Rd. Dugspur, VA; www.foggyridgecider.com

Great Shoals Winery: 7050 Carroll Ave. Takoma Park, MD; www.greatshoalstakoma.com


Coyote Hole

Coyote Hole Ciderworks
225 Oak Grove Dr. Lake Anna, VA
540-894-1053 | www.coyotehole.com

Find Coyote Hole Ciderworks in the heart of Virginia at Lake Anna on 37 beautiful acres. Their hard ciders are produced with 100 percent Virginia apples and pears, gluten-free and never made from concentrate. Ranging in sweetness levels from dry to sweet with a minimum of 6.5 percent ABV, their ciders rise above the pack and are true Virginia craft ciders. They encourage a friendly and relaxing atmosphere at their tasting room where you can enjoy their flagship ciders, Oma Smith’s, Opa Smith’s and HPA (Hopped Pressed Apple), along with a variety of seasonal ciders.


Mt. Defiance Cidery & Distillery: 495 E. Washington St. Middleburg, VA; www.mtdefiance.com

Old Hill Cider: 17768 Honeyville Rd. Timberville, VA; www.oldhillcider.com

Old Trade Brewery & Cidery: 13270 Alanthus Rd. Brandy Station, VA; www.oldtradebrewery.com

Potter’s Craft Cider: 4699 Catterton Rd. Free Union, VA; www.potterscraftcider.com

Red Shedman Farm Brewery: 13601 Glissans Mill Rd. Mt. Airy, VA; www.redshedman.com

Supreme Core Cider: 2400 T St. NE, DC; www.supremecorecider.com

Wild Hare Hard Cider: 106A South St. SE, Leesburg, VA; www.wildharecider.com

Winchester Ciderworks: 2504 N. Frederick Pk. Winchester, VA; www.winchesterciderworks.com

The Winery at Kindred Pointe: 3575 Conicville Rd. Mt. Jackson, VA; www.kindredpointe.com


Willow Oaks

Willow Oaks Craft Cider
6219 Harley Rd. Middletown, MD
301-371-4814 | www.willowoakscraftcider.com

Willow Oaks crafts their farmhouse-style cider from certified organic, American heirloom apples on their 35-acre farm. But they also use organic pears, blueberries, black currants and other fruits to make tasty additions to Willow Oaks’ ciders. Fabulous fruit, unique terroir and small-batch barrel fermentation let the flavors and aroma of the fruit shine through for a crisp, dry finish. While you sip on some cider, visit the Willow Oaks barn tasting room, farm stand and art gallery. Their tasting room is open April to December on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., and January to March by appointment.

Photo: Courtesy of Mike Stein

What’s On Tap: Lost Lager’s Mike Stein

We’ve spoken to bar managers, brewers, beer directors and even distributors about how and why they’re connected to beer. This month, we wanted to talk to someone who spends a tremendous amount of time looking backward rather than forward. Mike Stein has written about beer – both journalistically and academically – and is currently a beer historian at DC Brau. He also helped found Lost Lagers, a title attached to numerous events around the city pertaining to historic brews. We got a chance to talk to Stein about his passion for beer, his connection to the craft and what’s next for Lost Lagers.

On Tap: You’re passionate enough about beer to have written an MFA thesis on the topic. Where does your excitement about beer stem from?
Mike Stein: My passion for beer springs from a deep spiritual well. For me, beer is more than a beverage. [It’s] a way to convene with the ancestors. It’s also an opportunity to taste history in a glass, especially when recreating beers with recipes from [hundreds of years ago]. My father was born in Prague, and the Czechs drink the most beer per person in the world. So, beer is part of the national identity. My father’s identity was half Catholic, half Jewish, so my passion for beer has evolved from a fascinating intersection of identity, religion and beer. For me, beer and identity are inseparable.

OT: When did you know you were more than a casual drinker, and when did you decide to diversify your tastes?
MS: I am still, for the most part, a casual drinker. I can turn off my hyper-analytical mind and put away my chattering monkey to simply enjoy the beverage in front of me. You might be surprised to find me enjoying some dry cider or a French rosé. It’s only in the last couple of years that I’ve begun to diversify my tastes for fermented beverages as I’ve branched into wine writing.

OT: As a historian, what are some of the most interesting things you’ve discovered about beer?
MS: I think the most interesting thing is how misled most of us have been by popular culture. Yes, Thomas Jefferson drank beer, but did you know his wife and daughter brewed a healthy portion of it? Or that James Hemings, older brother of Sally Hemings, was America’s first chef de cuisine and served dinner to both Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton? Or that his younger brother Peter oversaw brewing operations at Monticello and was so impressive that Jefferson told James Madison to send someone to study with Hemings? Because brewing today is so pale and male, I think some of the most interesting times in American history [have been] when this paradigm was upset – and it’s so rarely discussed.

OT: Why is the DC area so conducive for good breweries, especially ones experimenting with new methods?
MS: Part of the DC area’s strength in being a hotbed of brewing action is that the scene is relatively young. Considering DC Brau is the first production brewery in DC since 1956, it shows how recently the trend of good drink and food has seen an uptick in the city. The rise of good food has allowed Brau to work with restaurants like All-Purpose [Pizzeria] and Maketto to produce amazing lagers like Full Count and Tuk Tuk, respectively. These pale lagers were designed specifically to suit the cuisines of those restaurants, and this is the kind of thoughtful work that the food makers and beer crafters are doing in unison to elevate the scene.

OT: You work for DC Brau and a few other places, but from a flavor perspective, who’s churning out beers that people should pay attention to?
MS: Obviously, I love DC Brau and our Brau Pils remains my favorite, though Oktoberfest is currently giving it a run for its money. Port City is also creating some fantastic, world-class lager with their lager series, so I’m always paying attention to them. The brewpubs in DC are typically cranking out quality product, [including] Bluejacket, District ChopHouse and Right Proper Brewing Company.

OT: Any Lost Lager events coming up this fall?
MS: [This year] is the 160th anniversary of the first lager being brewed in Alexandria. We may or may not be brewing a historic lager with Port City, and we may or may not be piloting a batch with [Lost Rhino’s] Favio Garcia at the newly-opened Dynasty Brewing in Ashburn. We may or may not be making several historic ales and lagers with Dynasty. However, we’re definitely leading our Historic Homebrewing: Porter from George Washington to Near Extinction class at the Hill Center just south of Eastern Market on November 18.

For more information about Mike Stein and Lost Lagers, follow them on Twitter at @beermadeclear and @LostLagers.

For tickets and more information on Stein’s historic homebrewing class, visit www.hillcenterdc.org/partner/lost-lagers.


Greetings, beer nerds! As you likely know, there are a number of fantastic spots in the DMV where you can grab a pint, and their menus are always evolving and adapting to your tastes. If you’d rather avoid the guessing game, check out what’s coming up at a few of these fine establishments.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3

Left Hand Brewing 25th Anniversary Beer Release
Join Left Hand Brewery at Dacha Beer Garden for their 25th anniversary beer release. In addition to the special anniversary brew, there will be Chai Milk Stout and Pixan Pepper Porter available on draft. 4-10:30 p.m. Free to attend. Dacha Beer Garden: 1600 7th St. NW, DC; www.dachadc.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4

The Great Lakes 30th Anniversary Celebration
Join as ChurchKey and Great Lakes Brewing Company celebrate with 14 beers from the Cleveland, Ohio brewery. The party includes an unbelievable list of beers including their hard-to-find keg of 30th Anniversary Imperial Oyster Stout. There will also be five different barrel-aged rarities from Great Lakes. 4-11 p.m. Free to attend. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC; www.churchkeydc.com

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5

Brewers Chili Throwdown
Join for the annual chili cook-off event where local breweries bring in their own chili recipes to compete in a heated contest of which brewery can craft the tastiest chili. Along with great beer, what more can you ask for? 5-8 p.m. Tickets $20. Tysons Biergarten: 8436 Leesburg Pike, Tysons, VA;  www.tysonsbiergarten.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6

Hoppy Oktoberfest
Join as Mad Fox turns the Market Square they call home into an Oktoberfest biergarden, where they’ll showcase a large selection of hoppy beers from some of Virginia’s finest breweries including traditional German Oktoberfest beers. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets available online. Mad Fox Brewery: 444 W. Broad St. Falls Church, VA; www.madfoxbrewing.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6 – SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7

Love Beer Fest
Don’t miss the first annual Love Beer Fest, a celebration of great beer and the passionate people who brew it. Held in DC near Yards Park, this family-friendly event is open to all beer lovers at no cost. Explore and enjoy a curated selection of 100-plus beers from more than 15 breweries across the country. Festivalgoers will have the opportunity to sample limited edition and seasonal beers, some of which will be available for the first time on the DC market. Devils Backbone will debut a unique, extra dry, brut-style lager with a light body and dry finish brewed specially for the festival. Love Beer Fest: First and M Streets and New Jersey Avenue in SE, DC; www.lovebeerfest2018.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7

Pugs & Pints
Join the Pigs & Pugs Project for an afternoon of sipping locally made craft beers in the Denizens beer garden with your favorite pug for a good cause. Your $20 ticket includes a pint of beer, vegan treats for you (and your pup), lawn games, and a reusable Pigs & Pugs Project tote. All proceeds will go toward microgrants that support pug rescues in need. 1-3 p.m. $10-$20. Denizens Brewing Co.: 1115 East West Hwy. Silver Spring, MD; www.denizensbrewingco.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13

Snallygaster 2018
Snallygaster is making its triumphant return to DC for its seventh year as a rollicking salute to craft beer. Festivalgoers can expect an unbelievable array of no fewer than 350 small-batch, highly sought-after brews on draft from the finest American and international producers set against a backdrop of local food trucks and two stages of live music. 1:30-7 p.m. Tickets $40-$65. Snallygaster: 6th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue in NW, DC; www.snallygasterdc.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16

Seabee OktoBEEfest DC
Gather your crew for an awesome evening at The Brig DC, including a dog-friendly atmosphere, cornhole, food, plenty of room to move and plenty of beers on tap. Those with an official SHF OktoBEEfest glass get extended happy hour pricing for drinks. 3-11:30 p.m. Tickets $10. The Brig DC: 1007 8th St. SE, DC; www.thebrigdc.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18

Pumpkin Carving with Devils Backbone
One ticket purchase will include one pumpkin and one beer from the Devils Backbone draft selection. The Embassy Row Hotel will provide all the essential tools and decorations you’ll need to create the best pumpkin in DC. The carving will commence around 6 p.m. on the patio of Station Kitchen and Cocktails. Tickets $12. The Embassy Row Hotel: 2015 Massachusetts Ave. NW, DC; www.destinationhotel.com/embassy-row-hotel

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

Shucktoberfest Beer and Oyster Festival
Calling all beer and oyster lovers. Don’t miss more than 40 local craft beer tents, food and vendor tents, and more right in Shirlington Village. The event is bringing all of your favorite Virginia breweries together in one place, so come sip your favorite brews, sample new ones and enjoy an array of fresh oysters. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets $30-$35. Village at Shirlington: 2700 Quincy St. Arlington, VA; www.shucktoberfestva.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

Rock the Core Cider Fest
A celebration of cider, beer and great tunes, Rock the Core transports the orchard to your mug with more than 50-plus ciders and craft beers offered onsite. Sip on a Granny Smith, swig a sweet Golden Russet and discover untapped apple flavors while savoring local eats and live entertainment. 1-9 p.m. $50-$75. Akridge Lot at Buzzard Point: 1926 2nd St. SW, DC; www.rockthecorefest.com

Photo: Rey Lopez

Sarah Rosner Brings Her DC Bartending Experience to Bourbon Steak

Sarah Rosner has launched some impressive cocktail programs over her 17 years of bartending in DC, including menus at Breadsoda and Radiator inside Logan Circle’s Mason & Rook Hotel. Her latest gig, though, has arguably the highest profile yet.

Back in August, Rosner took the reins as the head bartender at Bourbon Steak, the posh bar inside the Four Seasons Hotel in Georgetown. She’s the first woman to lead the bar in its 10-year history, and says she’s excited to put her spin on what’s become a drinking destination for creative libations that go far beyond steakhouse clichés like martinis or Manhattans.

While some may see hotel life as hectic, Rosner, who lives in Dupont Circle, says she gets a jolt out of interacting with the diverse and often inquisitive flow of regulars and tourists in the neighborhood.

“You’ll have guests that you won’t see for six months, and then they’ll come back and you’re like home to them,” she says. “People have the time to learn, too. They have the time to sit there and nerd out with you. It’s fun.”

Rosner says so far, change has mostly been gradual and geared toward elevating the little details – like new tools and good ice that she says can set great cocktail programs apart.

She’s also been working with and learning from the restaurant’s sommelier, Winn Roberton, and Executive Chef Drew Adams, on how to incorporate elements from the rest of the restaurant into the bar.

Her biggest fingerprint comes this month with the launch of her first seasonal cocktail menu, which will fuse fall flavors with tropical touches that give a nod to her Hawaiian upbringing. One example is the Tiki in the Mountains (a.k.a. A Hula Skirt and a Kilt Have a Baby). The cocktail is made with a private cask selected in partnership with Virginia Distillery Co. and uses the classic tiki pairing of whiskey, cinnamon and grapefruit.

“This pairing and spirit seemed like the perfect way to put my spin on something uniquely Bourbon Steak.”

Another option will be a play on an Old Fashioned using macadamia nut-infused whiskey, something she says she’s always wanted to serve to guests. The fall menu will also include a few cocktail favorites from years past as part of the spot’s 10-year anniversary.

When she’s not mixing drinks at the Four Seasons, Rosner continues to be an active supporter of the DC bartending industry through participation in organizations like the DC Craft Bartenders Guild. She feels grateful to be able to contribute to the men and women in the community who have helped her throughout her time in the city and allowed each other to be successful.

“We have a great community here. People are finally recognizing us, and we’re finally stepping up to that. We all set the bar high.”

A big part of that national recognition is the rising tide of variety and quality of drinks in the city, whether it’s a dive bar or a steakhouse inside a five-star hotel. The other part though – arguably the more important part – is hospitality and service. That’s something Rosner always keeps at the forefront of her mind, wherever she’s working.

“I hope I can rub off on people,” she says of her new gig. “I feel like people have been getting excited, and guests can really see that when you care, they care. It’s infectious.”

Follow Bourbon Steak on social media at @bourbonsteakdc and learn more about Rosner’s brand-new cocktail menu at www.fourseasons.com/washington/dining/restaurants/bourbon_steak.

Bourbon Steak, Four Seasons Hotel: 2800 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, DC; 202-944-2026; www.fourseasons.com/washington/dining/restaurants/bourbon_steak

Correction: An earlier version of this article stated that Rosner developed menus for Jack Rose and Marvin. 

Photo: Mark Williams Hoelscher, @mwhphoto

Capitol Cider House Brings Local Flavor to the District’s Burgeoning Cider Scene

A revisiting of Mid-Atlantic roots, Capitol Cider House’s local influence can be felt at every touch point, from the product it sources to the design aesthetic in the Georgia Avenue space. The Petworth newcomer opened three months ago and has been a welcome addition to the booming neighborhood.

Speaking of being neighborly, there’s a heavy emphasis on all things local with a commitment to sourcing within a 200-mile radius of the U.S. Capitol Building. The industrial space is outfitted with reclaimed wood pieces and splashes of patriotic red, white and blue – with a back-wall mural executed by DC creatives No Kings Collective. The open layout features community seating with high tops scattered throughout the main space, a smaller private room dubbed the “Brewer’s Table” and an outdoor patio.

Founder Jared Fackrell first started experimenting with cider two years ago after a family trip to the Finger Lakes in New York. There, he and his wife found themselves at a cider house where they were struck by the complexity of flavors, crispness and wine-like taste of the ciders they sampled. They returned to DC joking about creating their own cider, prompting Fackrell to purchase a how-to book on cider production.

The jokes materialized into a hobby where, armed with his Amazon Books purchase, prior homebrewing knowledge (he had brewed beer years ago) and self-built equipment, Fackrell set off on a course that would eventually lead to opening Capitol Cider House.

DC’s newest cidery arrives at a time when local and regional cideries are on the rise in popularity and growth. According to the United States Association of Cider Makers, dollar sales of craft cider increased 39 percent in 2016 when compared to 2015 and in the past year, market share grew 30 percent for regional ciders.

As members of a CSA (community supported agriculture), Fackrell and his wife saw the value of reconnecting with food and knowing where produce comes from – a big driver behind his devotion to keeping that local flair for Capitol Cider House. When asked what he thinks is the driving force behind the renewed interest in cider both regionally and nationally, Fackrell notes, “Part of it stems from this reconnection of where your food is coming from. Folks are starting to revalue the taste of something over the appearance.”

The local curiosity of knowing where food products are sourced and how they are made is evident come pressing time at the cidery. Every Monday through Wednesday, the team clears the main space for apple processing: furniture is pushed back, sleeves are rolled up and 3,000 pounds of apples are pressed. Passersbys can get a not so behind-the-scenes look at what goes into this process courtesy of the floor-to-ceiling window storefront. Fackrell notes that many a curious pedestrian has stopped to peer in, press a nose to the glass and take a video, helping to demystify how it all works.

With two cideries already on the DC scene, Capitol Cider House’s approach is distinct from its counterparts. Those with a palate geared toward craft beers will likely be intrigued by Ivy City’s Supreme Core offerings, whereas guests with a penchant for Spanish wines or Basque-style cider will find appealing options at DC’s first cidery, Anxo. In contrast, Capitol Cider House will focus on the barrel-aging process to produce smaller-batch ciders, fortifying them to create an apple, port-like product.

Twelve taps behind the bar feature 10 ciders, including Anxo and Supreme Core, with the remaining two saved for mead and beer. The menu also includes over 30 bottled ciders. Not sure where to start? Opt for a flight of four ciders chosen at the drinker’s discretion or preselected by the cidermaker.

As for food, the cidery partnered up with Union Kitchen alums to bring local, homegrown fare to the table. Guests will find Sri Lankan street food in the form of roti and sambol from Ten Tigers Parlour’s Short Eats pop-up, as well as a slew of Colombian-style empanadas from M’Panadas. Additionally, the food menu includes cheese plates and hot dogs with hamburgers coming soon.

In the next few months, expect another collaboration with Distillery Lane Ciderworks near Frederick, Maryland (Fackrell worked with the distillery to produce his first house cider Quincey, which has since poured its last drop), cold weather cider options (think mulled versions perfect for the impending cooler temperatures) and more house products added to the tap list.

Sunday jazz brunch is a recent endeavor that will likely become a mainstay, a nostalgic nod to Fackrell’s days as an undergrad in New Orleans. Customers can expect more food pop-ups, events with guest bartenders showcasing cider in cocktails and other fun collaborations.

Three months in, the neighborhood’s reception of Capitol Cider House has been warm and welcoming – the bar even has a group of regulars. But Fackrell isn’t ready to slow down yet. With the apple harvest coming up, he’s already thinking ahead and excited about  producing cider and “introducing more of our products under the tap list.”

To those still unsure about the cider craze?

“I would offer that most people who come in here and don’t know anything about cider who are willing to at least try, some of them will walk out with a different impression – the same way that I walked out up in New York.”

Visit Capitol Cider House on Thursday and Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Learn more at www.capitolciderhouse.com and follow the cidery on social media at @capciderhouse.

Capitol Cider House: 3930 Georgia Ave. NW, DC; 202-621-0982; www.capitolciderhouse.com

Photos: Lizzie Sorkin

Crafting Community at Streetcar 82

The genesis of Streetcar 82 Brewing Co. is not unlike many other microbreweries that now heavily populate the DMV. What was born of a humble homebrewing project among a group of friends and Gallaudet graduates evolved into a brick-and-mortar brewery in the heart of downtown Hyattsville.

Streetcar 82, newly opened in July, is named for an actual streetcar that connected bustling neighborhoods through DC and Maryland during its 70-year run. While the streetcar itself is now defunct, the brewery’s namesake serves as a fitting metaphor for its ability to connect multiple communities in one place – over delicious beer, of course.

The space aims to create connections among Gallaudet grads, the larger deaf community, Hyattsville residents and craft beer enthusiasts, to name a few. But  what really sets co-owners Mark Burke, Jon Cetrano and Sam Costner apart is the fact that they place as much emphasis on creating a welcoming space for people from different communities as they do on their carefully crafted beers.

“The sense of community that we hope to foster has been a driving factor in the creation of Streetcar 82,” Cetrano says. “Having a sense of place is very important. Gallaudet University is the only university in the world for deaf people, and the sense of community and bond that one gets there is very powerful. As a deaf person, it is an instant connection. Whether you attend there – or are just visiting campus to see and be in a place that welcomes you – [it’s] powerful.”

Their communities were integral in the actual creation of the brewery. The co-owners explain they were encouraged by a professor in Gallaudet’s Department of Business to open their own brewery, and even went on to win a fan favorite award at a university-hosted business pitch competition.

Social media also proved to be an important aspect of the launch. They posted updates on the brewery’s progress via their Instagram account while preparing to open, including ways for thirsty future patrons to contribute to their launch through a Kickstarter page. That alone was indicative of the area’s desire for a space like this. Streetcar 82 raised over $25,000, surpassing their goal before the campaign even closed.

Burke says they also received an outpouring of support from the Hyattsville community, including Kickstarter contributions and help from the Hyattsville Community Development Corporation to get the business up and running. He describes Hyattsville as a place where “we felt comfortable starting a business because we knew the community there would help us thrive.”

Still, the support they received didn’t make them immune to the growing pains many new businesses face and the challenge of a more limited budget than they had hoped for. Costner explains that while they obtained loans in addition to the funding from their supporters, they still had to dramatically readjust their expectations.

“We had to plan on doing a lot of the work ourselves to save money,” Costner says. “We did all the demolition work, a lot of physical labor and all the cosmetic work.”

Their efforts included painting, building the bar and installing the walk-in refrigerator, all as a way to conserve funds.

“In the end, this turned out to be a boon because we moved along a lot faster than if we waited for contractors to do the work. So not having all the money we wanted turned out to be a blessing in disguise.”

Streetcar 82 has felt support from other local breweries and members of the DMV beer community. The teams at Shaw’s Right Proper Brewing Company and Baltimore-based Suspended Brewing, and local brewer Matt Humbard (formerly of Handsome Brewing Company), have offered their professional opinions and even lent equipment when needed. Streetcar’s brewers have also forged a friendship with their neighbors at Pizzeria Paradiso and are currently planning the release of a coffee stout with Hyattsville roasters Vigilante Coffee Company.

As for beer options, the co-founders consider Streetcar to be Belgian-inspired due to the prevalence of Belgian yeasts in their brews. While you can find those varieties shining in their interpretations of New England and farmhouse IPAs and a Belgian dark strong ale, don’t expect only one style from Streetcar 82. The trio is plotting to add Märzens and Oktoberfest-style beers to their roster this month and aim to have at least half a dozen beers on tap on any given day.

And while their ties to the deaf community are strong and the presence of American Sign Language is apparent, Streetcar 82 is a place for everyone to call their own.

“We worked hard to develop a place that is diverse, neighborly and intimate,” Cetrano says. “Our brewery is a place where people can really chat with each other and see people with their kids and dogs. When you’re there, you feel like you belong.”

Check www.streetcar82brewing.com for more information about Streetcar 82. Follow them on Instagram at @streetcar82brewingco and Facebook at @Streetcar82 for the brewery’s most updated hours.

Streetcar 82 Brewing Co.: 4824 Rhode Island Ave. Hyattsville, MD; www.streetcar82brewing.com

Streetcar 82 2 (Photo - Lizzie Sorkin)

Photo: www.facebook.com/sankofabeer

What’s On Tap September 2018: Sankofa Beer

Ever heard of Sankofa Beer? With how large the DC brewing scene has gotten, it’s possible these brewers slipped through the cracks. However, just because they’re new and relatively small doesn’t mean their beer has failed to drum up interest. West African founders Amado Carsky and Kofi Meroe received almost $29,000 from a Kickstarter campaign last year, including donations from around the globe. Sankofa’s flagship Hypebiscus, a hibiscus pale ale, is now available in several DC locations. With two more beers on the way, On Tap decided to chat with Meroe about the pair’s unique influences, the international support they’ve received and what’s next for them.

On Tap: What West African influences did you draw from?
Kofi Meroe: The things we experimented with were cool and different and things we’d grown up with. We’ve done cola nuts, something that’s native to West Africa. [It’s] basically just a bigger nut with caffeine, so we’d use that to make porters and stouts. We used hibiscus because we wanted to experiment with that. Obviously, we’ve used spicy foods and peppers. We get these inspirations from our upbringings and it was easy for us, because it’s who we are. Sankofa is the Twi language of Ghana, and it means to go back and take. It’s not taboo to take your past to reinforce the future. You can’t have a strong future if you don’t know where you came from. For us embarking in this new industry, we wanted to be authentic.

OT: How did you get started in brewing?
KM: I relocated to DC after I graduated. I left college with a passion for exploring craft beer. I started homebrewing, thinking I could save some money as opposed to going to stores to buy six-packs. It just so happens that my business partner, who is also my cousin [Carsky], was living here as well. We were brewing a German hefeweizen and we loved that process, and the beer came out pretty good. Since then, we’ve been homebrewing together for eight years. We never really intended to have a company, but two years ago we decided to go for it.

OT: What spurred you toward turning your hobby into a business?
KM: Essentially, we thought our beer was really good, and we were finally starting to make relationships with brewers and people in the industry. We finally got to the place where we thought it was good enough to put out there. We tried to hedge our process by taking little steps. First was to establish the business, second was to share our beer to people who matter and getting feedback from professionals. For most of 2017, we took our homebrews on tour and found private events and folks who didn’t mind if we set up in the corner and did tastings. We created the hashtag #SankofaSummer, but that excitement that we generated led us to the next step, which was figuring out what we needed to start a business.

OT: Your next step was starting a Kickstarter campaign for your business. How did raising almost $29,000 change things for you and Amado?
KM: I had to ship a Kickstarter award to Denmark and other places I hadn’t been. At the end of the day, our friends really came through for us in ways that I wouldn’t have been able to imagine. Even if they couldn’t give, they were spreading the word and they were very fervent about doing that. We had a lot of help in facilitating that campaign. It was also scary, because we raised this money and now we have to do something. We have to go out and do what we know we can do. We’re excited.

OT: Why do you think you were able to get so many donations from around the world? What about your product and background do you think resonates with so many beer drinkers?
KM: We have generated a following. There’s not a lot of people that look like us in beer who own craft beer brands. A lot of people get excited when they see us for that reason. And the beer, on top of that, is really good. We’ve gone to a lot of cultural events, and we’re always in places with cultural diversity, so we’re starting to build followings in these other communities. If anything, it’s an homage to the regions here – that someone in another state or country would pick our beer up.

OT: Where are you guys right now with the process?
KM: We just launched [at the end of June], and we’re still going through our first batch. We plan to brew in the next two to three weeks [late August]. What we do now is brew at Calvert Brewing Company in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. We wanted to find someone who could work with our culture, and the technical part just involved figuring out a recipe to work with their system.

For more information about future releases or to see the entire list of places Hypebiscus is currently available, visit www.sankofabeer.com.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

Wild Hare Hard Cider at Herndon Labor Day Festival
Head to downtown Herndon for this annual Labor Day Festival featuring craft beers, great music, outstanding sponsors, delicious food vendors and lawn games. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Herndon Town Green: 777 Lynn St. Herndon, VA; www.wildharecider.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Beer Yoga
Flow through a flight of brewery favorites during this hour-long power yoga class. Come for yoga, nama’stay for beer. Don’t forget to bring your own mat. Three-glass flights included in yoga class ticket purchase. This 21-plus class is suitable for yogis of all levels. 12-1 p.m. Tickets $15. Right Proper Brewing Company Brookland Production House + Tasting Room: 920 Girard St. NE, DC; www.rightproperbrewing.com

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Fairfax Beer Garden
With over 700 people in attendance at the first Fairfax Beer Garden, High Side is excited to host another round. The garden will feature a 10-tap beer trailer with an amazing lineup of brews. Try out unique Asian street food or check out what Coyote Grille’s “Roaming Coyote” food truck will be serving. Play games like life-sized Jenga, Connect Four and cornhole, and catch some football games via livestream. 12-8 p.m. Tickets $19-$23. High Side: 4009 Chain Bridge Rd. Fairfax, VA; www.fairfaxbeergarden.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

The Aslin Three-Year Anniversary Pre-Party
For those who can’t make the official anniversary party at Aslin, which will happen on September 15, come to ChurchKey on Thursday for an incredible lineup of out-of-market breweries to celebrate the third anniversary of Aslin Beer Company. ChurchKey will pour a slew of specialty beers from Aslin and friends, featuring hard-to-find kegs from nearly 15 different breweries. Highlights include Southern Grist, Dancing Gnome, Narrow Gauge, Deciduous and Resident Culture, with more to be announced. ChurchKey: 1337 14th St. NW, DC;
www.churchkeydc.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

Fonta Flora Brewery Tap Takeover at ANXO
Fonta Flora Brewery in Morgantown, North Carolina was kind enough to send seven kegs of delicious farmhouse ales and lagers to ANXO Cidery for guests to try this month for a special event. The tasting starts at 5 p.m. along with the pintxo happy hour with pairings and flights, and continues all night until close. Don’t miss this opportunity to try some amazing beer from one of the best breweries in the country. 5 p.m. – 12 a.m. ANXO Cidery & Pintxos Bar: 300 Florida Ave. NW, DC; www.anxodc.com

Spontaneous: The Art of Natural Wine & Beer
Let The Sovereign introduce you to the incredible world of spontaneously fermented wine and beer by showcasing five natural wines side-by-side with five wild ales. The Sovereign proudly features a wide array of spontaneously fermented beers, from Belgian lambic to American wild ales, and a selection of natural wines from France, Italy and Austria. Don’t miss some fantastic avant-garde winemakers showcasing rarely seen varietals such as Negrette and Grauburgunder along with some American and Italian examples of spontaneously fermented ales. 5-11 p.m. Free to attend. The Sovereign: 1206 Wisconsin Ave. NW, DC; www.thesovereigndc.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

Capital BrewFest
Celebrate local beer, wine and music at Capital BrewFest. Each ticket includes your own tasting cup where you’ll get to sample more than 50 rare and seasonal beers from the region’s very best craft breweries, 30 wines including a ton of rosé varietals, and tons of cider and gluten-free options. There will be seven amazing food options available for purchase, plus live music all day on the mainstage and inside to keep the party going, and lots of fun outdoor games, activities and arts. 12:30-8 p.m. Tickets $19.95-$59.95. The Fairgrounds: 1299 Half St. SE, DC; www.brewfestdc.com

End of Summer Beer Garden & Hoedown
Come celebrate the spring with a rooftop beer garden event at Up Top Acres. Standing on a roof at a farm, you will enjoy a memorable day of good beer, delicious food and live music. So bring your friends and come and enjoy an afternoon at the farm and drink and eat until the sun sets over the city. Each ticket grants entrance to the venue and unlimited samplings of four beer and food pairings. 4-7 p.m. Tickets $35-$45. The Farm at 55 M Street: 55 M St. SE, DC; www.uptopacres.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

Beer Dinner & Pairing Course
Would you call yourself a foodie? Or perhaps a connoisseur of the ales? Maybe both? Heritage Brewpub will be hosting a private five-course beer dinner, handcrafted by Executive Chef Josh Ber, and expertly paired with Heritage brews by Michael Smythe. Settle in for an evening of sensory experiences as you’re taken on a journey of seasonal dishes and handcrafted treats: a total of five expertly paired courses, each accompanying an ale that was chosen to accentuate and build upon the flavors of the dish. 6-9 p.m. Tickets $88. Heritage Brewpub & Roastery: 1300-1398 N. Fillmore St. Arlington, VA; www.heritagebrewing.com

Bell’s Beer Dinner
Zaytinya is thrilled to welcome back Bell’s Brewery for an evening of beer, food and conversation. Head Chef Michael Costa has created a unique five-course menu to pair with the brewery’s delicious array of award-winning and fan favorite brews. Space is limited so be sure to book a seat soon. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Tickets $65. Zaytinya: 701 9th St. NW, DC; www.zaytinya.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

Oktoberfest at The Republic
Republic is once again bringing the world-famous German beer festival from Munich to Woodbridge. Join them for great beer, delicious German-inspired food, traditional music, cool vendors, and fun in the tap room and outdoor biergarten. There will be a Märzen competition, featuring several locally brewed Oktoberfest lagers from the best regional breweries. Enjoy the beers and then determine which is the best – the people’s champion will take home the coveted Märzen Cup and bragging rights until next year. You’ll also get a handsome commemorative glass stein to help you remember the festival, just in case the beers make it hard to do that on your own. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tickets $5-$29.99. Brew Republic Bierwerks: 15201 Potomac Town Pl. Woodbridge, VA; www.brewrepublic.beer

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

Crystal City Oktoberfest
Swing by Crystal City for Northern Virginia’s largest Oktoberfest celebration. Try over 100 craft beers from over 50 regional craft breweries. And food will be more than just sausages and pretzels: satisfy your hunger with a wide assortment of food trucks from New York-style pizza to tacos and more. Tickets include 10 4-oz. beer sampling tickets (you can purchase additional beer tickets once you’re there), entry into the festival and live entertainment. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tickets $15-$45. Crystal City Oktoberfest: 220 20th St. S, Crystal City, VA www.crystalcity.org

District Oktoberfest
Celebrate Oktoberfest in style with a beer-fueled tour of Chinatown’s best venues. A different 12-oz. Oktoberfest beer at each and every venue is included in the ticket price. Start at the check-in location and then go on to five other great venues in any order and at any pace you choose. All guests receive specials on food pairings and $4 liquor pairings, and $4 specials on additional servings of the featured Oktoberfest beers. A portion of proceeds from this event will benefit local DC charities. Cheers! Check in from 12-3 p.m. Event is from 12-10 p.m. Tickets $50. Buffalo Billiards: 1330 19th St. NW, DC; www.buffalobilliardsdc.com

Photos: Trent Johnson

From Freshman Foodie to Instagram Influencer: @dcfoodporn’s Justin Schuble

It definitely feels a little meta to watch On Tap’s assistant editor Trent Johnson take photos of @dcfoodporn’s Justin Schuble taking photos of Brothers and Sisters Pastry Chef Pichet Ong’s ornate The London cake at the LINE Hotel. This feeling is only intensified by the fact that our subject is on the stairs by the LINE’s iconic, off-kilter mirror – perhaps one of DC’s most Instaworthy spots to date – so there’s two camera-wielding Schubles and two mouthwatering, crepe-stacked cakes in every photo.

All self-referential insights aside, we decided to meet up with DC’s most successful food Instagrammer – with 246,000 followers and counting – at his location of choice so we could see him in action. The LINE has been high on his wish list for some time, so we pop down to the impossibly trendy AdMo hotel one afternoon in August to pick the 23-year-old’s brain about how he turned his college hobby into a booming millennial business.

The Instagram influencer is soft-spoken and thoughtful, an adept multitasker who is constantly searching the room for the best angles while still giving us his full attention. He approaches food photography – and his entire @dcfoodporn brand – as a curated experience, bringing an artistic element to every shoot. A steady stream of decadent desserts keeps coming from Erik Bruner-Yang’s kitchen, the final one in the hands of the pastry chef himself, who chats with us for a few about photography on the LINE’s front steps.

Schuble moves deliberately during the shoot, selecting a new location in the hotel’s lobby for each dessert and experimenting with countless angles. When he is sure he has enough options, we sink into two oversized armchairs and begin to talk shop – from his creative process for keeping his content engaging to how he grew his account from 100 followers as a Georgetown freshman to hundreds of thousands of followers as the owner of a profitable business.

BEFORE THERE WAS @DCFOODPORN, there was @freshman_foodie. After growing up in a Potomac, Maryland household that rarely ate at home – save for takeout – and with zero interest in subsisting solely off of Georgetown’s dining hall options, it made perfect sense to Schuble to eat out a lot. And as millennials often do, he began snapping photos of his food and posting them to his personal Instagram account.

Countless food posts later, he created the @freshman_foodie handle and a food-only account. By the end of the year, he had 100 followers and decided to rebrand with his current handle, which has now been used as a hashtag on Instagram in almost 272,000 posts.

The business school student bought a camera that summer and taught himself some photography basics, like how to manipulate lighting. He remains a self-taught photographer even now, crediting his natural eye for knowing what elements need to come together in a successful post.

Schuble has experienced steady growth since launching @dcfoodporn, reaching the 10,000-follower mark within a year. As his account became more popular, his plans to pursue a career in finance or marketing – real estate and working on Wall Street were among his considered paths – began to dwindle until he decided to try the Instagram influencer lifestyle out for one year. Fast forward to a little over a year later, and he’s running a successful media company through the @dcfoodporn brand.

“It is crazy,” he says of his rapid rise to local fame. “I think I got really lucky with timing. I was lucky that I got to experiment with this in college. That really allowed me to let the passion drive the account and its growth. I was set up for success because I had the flexibility to do things that maybe weren’t going to work, and there was no financial pressure because I was in school.”

But now that he’s in the real world – Bethesda, to be exact – he defines success by a new set of metrics that includes being able to answer questions like, “Can I pay my rent?” in the affirmative.

It wasn’t until brands began courting Schuble that he realized @dcfoodporn was a potentially viable business. Sweetgreen was one of the first to reach out soon after the 10,000-follower benchmark, a geek out moment for him since the chain was started by three Georgetown business students. As more brands hired him for projects, he became more selective and set a standard rate for his services.

“A lot of what I’m doing recently is paid work with brands. They’ll send me a product, and I’ll have to shoot it and do all of the creative and figure out the style and what I want to pair it with, which I love. I think that’s more fun than going to a restaurant where the chef does all the creative work and I just have to do my best to make it look good.”

A National Tequila Day-themed post with a bottle of Jose Cuervo nestled among fresh avocado halves and tortilla chips, a Potbelly Free Shake Friday promo filled with neatly stacked Oreos surrounding an Oreo milkshake, and a drool-worthy picnic shot for Voss water are among his recent brand projects.

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WHILE SCHUBLE LOVES TRYING his hand at art direction for brands, a huge percentage of his feed is still devoted to the local food scene.

“It’s always different. Everything about what I do is different. There’s no typical day and no typical photo shoot, which keeps it fun. I love that.”

Whether the visit is planned or impromptu, he says he always asks to be seated by a window with natural lighting. He inquires about the best items on the menu – although he usually researches options in advance – and proceeds to order both what he wants to photograph and what he wants to actually eat. This of course begs the question: how much of what he photographs does he consume?

“I’m actually very healthy, so I don’t necessarily eat every single cake or whatever it is that I post,” he says. “I do prioritize my health. If I can bring someone along with me to help eat the food and be an extra set of hands, that’s always great. I’ll usually take a couple hundred photos at each restaurant. Then I’ll eat a little bit, pack up a ton of leftovers and bring them with me.”

When he’s not saving a ton of money on groceries and eating like a king from his couch, Schuble strikes a balance between promoting hip spots he likes and maintaining a visual aesthetic. He often has to make a Sophie’s Choice between a dish that photographs beautifully but is lackluster in comparison to an unphotogenic plate of nosh that piques his palate. Another crossroads he frequently encounters is whether or not to post about an amazing spot where the food is off the charts but doesn’t have Instaworthy presentation, or the interior is void of any decent lighting options.

It’s evident he takes the role of accurately representing DC’s food scene very seriously, and as a fellow local who has watched the District transform into a burgeoning foodie city, I truly appreciate that. He makes an excellent point that while the DMV has long been home to a myriad of authentic ethnic cuisines, the ambiance was often less than optimal for foodies back in the day. But with a trendier, more millennial-driven food scene on the rise, ethnic flavors are becoming more approachable as they’re being presented in hipper locales.

“I think it’s a lot easier now for people to be exposed to so many different things while still staying in their comfort zone. I also think it’s great that people in other cities actually see DC as a real food scene. It’s been cool to grow @dcfoodporn during that same time that DC has grown. When I started, my list of places to check out was not nearly as long as it is now just because every day, something new is popping up.”

ULTIMATELY, Schuble wants locals to recognize his brand. He’s proud of his DC following, and even notes that someone recognized him in the LINE’s lobby while he was waiting for our interview and asked if he was “that

@dcfoodporn guy.” On the flipside, he says he never takes advantage of that recognition when stumbling upon a new spot; instead, he prefers to fly under the radar as a paying customer.

When we start chatting about the road ahead, he says he’d love to reach a million followers.

“I think it’s nice to have huge goals that you can strive for. And if you don’t get there, don’t beat yourself up.”

In the meantime, he’s been expanding his brand to include more lifestyle and travel content.

“I posted a photo at the airport the other day and it got more likes than any of my food photos this week. I think people are hungry for different types of content and for me, it’s about playing around with that and figuring out what people want to see, what I want to post and how it relates to @dcfoodporn. How can I elevate the brand?”

As for how long he wants to stay on the influencer career track, that’s TBD. While he loves having a profitable outlet for his creative side and enjoys the perks of frequent travel and friendships formed with other media personalities, he’s also realistic about the burnout rate of this type of gig and says that at some point, it’d be nice to settle down and keep a normal schedule. He’s even toying with the idea of starting another media company – something related to food, but the next step.

“I do love the food scene, but for me it’s more about full experiences and being creative. I think food lends itself to that, but there are other areas I’d be interested in.”

For now, Schuble is committed to growing the @dcfoodporn brand, even leading social media workshops around the DC area to teach local Instagrammers how to tell their stories in a more engaging way. Don’t miss his next class at Rosslyn-based pop-up The Alcove (19th and N. Moore Streets) on Wednesday, September 11 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. Learn more at www.rosslynva.org/pop-up.

If you aren’t already following @dcfoodporn on Instagram, you should be. Learn more about Schuble and his media company at www.dcfoodporn.com.

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Photo: Kelli Scott

NoMa’s The Eleanor Offers Bowling and Bragworthy Bites

Don’t label The Eleanor just a bowling alley. It’s much more than that, according to founder Adam Stein.

Ever since he was a student at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Stein dreamed of opening a lounge with a bowling component to make it a multi-use entertainment space. That vision is realized with The Eleanor.

“You can come here for lots of different reasons,” Stein says. “You can come here because you want to bowl. You can come here because you want to play pinball games. You can come here because you want to have a three-course meal. We’ve got tons of events booked already and through the end of the year.”

Since opening June 19 in NoMa, The Eleanor has offered a place to enjoy 20 beers on tap, well-crafted cocktails, a projector for movie nights and, of course, two mini-bowling lanes with duckpin-sized balls.

The lanes are 45 feet long as opposed to the standard 60 feet, which Stein says can be harder, but it’s also a lower bar of entry. The floors aren’t waxed, so there’s no need to change shoes to play. Also, all of the balls are four pounds. While it’s best to reserve a lane and prepay online, walk-ins are accepted on a waitlist basis. Pricing is $10 per person for one hour of bowling with a $10 ball rental fee.

If you’re not interested in giving bowling a spin, choose from arcade games like Mortal Kombat 3, Pac-Man and Battle Royale, or head over to the Skee-Ball lanes.

When describing The Eleanor, Stein says he didn’t want anything “super slick” or “overly designed.” Instead, he opted for a laid-back but funky lounge with a hometown vibe. There are counter-height tables instead of low-tops to add to the casual atmosphere, and the local focus is found not only in the ingredients but in the name itself, which is a reference to DC Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton.

The menu adds humor to the spot with cocktails like Wildflowers Don’t Care Where They Grow. Other drinks are named after friends and family such as Jody’s Appletini, inspired by Stein’s mother as appletinis are her favorite cocktail. There are also two refreshing vodka slushies made with Spring 44 vodka, one with house-made horchata and Zeke’s cold brew coffee and the other with a house-made lavender lemonade.

The fare might seem typical at face value – burgers, nachos, fried chicken – but each dish has its own original twist. The buttermilk fried chicken thighs come with masala-spiced carrot puree and braised greens with a bacon and fish sauce. The chicken wings are coated in a General Tso’s-style sauce, the hushpuppies are made “elote loco-style” and the loaded hot dogs come with the optional add-on of kimchi.

Along with its quirky menu, The Eleanor offers a very convenient location across the street from the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro station. There is also free, onsite parking.

Stein considered Ivy City before settling on The Eleanor’s NoMa space on Florida Avenue. He was tempted by Ivy City’s warehouse spaces because they could fit full-sized bowling lanes, but he says he ultimately chose the right neighborhood.

“[NoMa is] only going to see an explosion of growth in the next two-and-a-half to three years,” he says. “We’re looking forward to it.”

Follow The Eleanor on Instagram and Facebook at @TheEleanorDC, and learn more about the bar at www.eleanordc.com.

The Eleanor: 100 Florida Ave. NE, DC; 202-758-2235; www.eleanordc.com